Getting to know a bit about XML without
having to dive into all the tech talk
Bernard Aschwanden
www.publishingsmarter.com...
About this session
17:52@publishsmarter
2
 Intro to the basics
 Define what XML is
 How it is used
 Why it benefits pe...
Rule 1: Know your audience
17:52@publishsmarter
3
 Here because nothing else on the agenda looked
good?
 Here because th...
Housekeeping and note taking
17:52@publishsmarter
4
 Not all slides or topics are
equally weighted
 Use some, discard ot...
About your speaker
17:52@publishsmarter
5
 Publishing Smarter:
President
 Content strategist,
publishing technologies
ex...
Services
17:52@publishsmarter
6
 We help clients:
 Create great content
 Manage content as an asset
 Deliver content t...
Standard disclaimer
17:52@publishsmarter
7
 In the interest of brevity I
will make some blanket
statements to keep it
sim...
I will attempt this in under 150 slides
@publishsmarter 17:52
8
Problems with content creators
Slide 1/149... They like to create content
17:52@publishsmarter
9
 They create a lot, often without following style guide...
Documentation issues (where XML may help)
17:52@publishsmarter
10
 Documentation costs money
 Researching and reviewing ...
eXtensible Markup Language
@publishsmarter 17:52
11
Basics of XML
Defining XML
17:52@publishsmarter
12
 Wikipedia: Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a
markup language that defines a set...
The purpose of XML for documentation
17:52@publishsmarter
13
 Allows for structured writing
 Provides software tool inde...
XML supports structured writing
17:52@publishsmarter
14
 Structure implies a set
of defined rules (law,
math, engineering...
Improve quality, reduce costs, increase profit
17:52@publishsmarter
15
 Long term benefits offset short term costs
 Docs...
Some (relatively) basic XML code
@publishsmarter 17:52
16
Exploring the code
What does it look like?
17:52@publishsmarter
17
 Looks a lot like HTML (or it can)
 <p>This sample <i>ain’t</i> perfect;...
What does it look like?
17:52@publishsmarter
18
 Looks a lot like HTML (or it can)
 <p>This sample <i>ain’t</i> perfect;...
What does it look like?
17:52@publishsmarter
19
 Looks a lot like HTML (or it can)
 <p>This sample <i>ain’t</i> perfect;...
What does it look like?
17:52@publishsmarter
20
 Looks a lot like HTML (or it can)
 <p>This sample <i>ain’t</i> perfect;...
What does it look like?
17:52@publishsmarter
21
 Looks a lot like HTML (or it can)
 <p>This sample <i>ain’t</i> perfect;...
Some (slightly complex) basic XML
code
@publishsmarter 17:52
22
Digging a bit deeper
It can look a lot more complex though
17:52@publishsmarter
23
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<p:s...
Looking at XML versions of MS Office
17:52@publishsmarter
24
1. Take any *.docx, *.pptx, or *.xlsx and make a copy
Looking at XML versions of MS Office
17:52@publishsmarter
25
1. Take any *.docx, *.pptx, or *.xlsx and make a copy
2. Rena...
Looking at XML versions of MS Office
17:52@publishsmarter
26
1. Take any *.docx, *.pptx, or *.xlsx and make a copy
2. Rena...
Explore the slides folder
17:52@publishsmarter
27
XML View: The title of slide 1
17:52@publishsmarter
28
<p:txBody>
<a:bodyPr/>
<a:lstStyle/>
<a:p>
<a:r>
<a:rPr lang="en-CA...
XML View: The body of slide 1
17:52@publishsmarter
29
<p:txBody>
<a:bodyPr/>
<a:lstStyle/>
<a:p>
<a:r>
<a:rPr lang="en-CA"...
Human usable XML might look moe like this
17:52@publishsmarter
30
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE task PU...
Reading it can be pretty simple (ignore code)
17:52@publishsmarter
31
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE tas...
Structure has some human-friendly feel to it
17:52@publishsmarter
32
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE task...
You can even understand the attributes
17:52@publishsmarter
33
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE task PUBLI...
Remember that XML provides a division
17:52@publishsmarter
34
Format
Content
With XML you spend your time wisely
17:52@publishsmarter
35
Content is manageable (size)
17:52@publishsmarter
36
Format Function
*.fm FrameMaker
*.txt Plain text
*.docx Word
*.xml St...
Content is manageable (CCMS)
17:52@publishsmarter
37
Many editors (tools) support XML
@publishsmarter 17:52
38
Real world work with XML
Notepad. You can edit with Notepad. Woo.
Hoo.
17:52@publishsmarter
39
Code view if you want/need it
17:52@publishsmarter
40
Code view is only one option
17:52@publishsmarter
41
Across multiple tools
17:52@publishsmarter
42
Mainstream tools offer a lot of support
17:52@publishsmarter
43
All the code is still there...
17:52@publishsmarter
44
XML makes it easier to focus on
details
@publishsmarter 17:52
45
Working with specific content
You can choose to show JUST the EndUser
17:52@publishsmarter
46
Show and hide based on attributes and values
17:52@publishsmarter
47
Or choose just Administrator content
17:52@publishsmarter
48
Display audience specific content
17:52@publishsmarter
49
Net benefit of two topics, one source
17:52@publishsmarter
50
 Less editing
 Fewer edits
 Less review time
 Quicker ap...
Pull together what you need
@publishsmarter 17:52
51
Quick and easy to assemble
Linear writing versus topic-based (DITA)
17:52@publishsmarter
52
This means that you can...
17:52@publishsmarter
53
 Open a single instance of a topic
 Edit only what is relevant, and b...
Many XML topics can come together
17:52@publishsmarter
54
TOPIC
REFERENCECONCEPT
TASK
TOPIC
REFERENCECONCEPT
TASK
TOPIC
RE...
It is not output restrictive
It is not device dependent
Summing up the discussion,
and options to continue it.
@publishsmarter 17:52
57
Conclusion and contact
About this session
17:52@publishsmarter
58
 Intro to the basics
 Define what XML is
 How it is used
 Why it benefits p...
Final request
17:52@publishsmarter
59
 Please suggest these slides to others
 If there are any problems with them, pleas...
Follow up contact information
17:52@publishsmarter
60
905 833 8448 (Eastern Time)
bernard@publishingsmarter.com
www.linked...
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XML for Humans: Non-geek Discussion of a Geek-chic Topic

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This session, presented at the Editors Conference in Toronto, on June 8, 2014, introduces you to the basics of XML, explaining what it is, how it is used, and why it benefits people who write and edit.

While THEY may love to work with code, the goal was to put as much of this into plain language for US as possible. I think it succeeded.

Participants could learn how clear and concise content can be created (and managed) in an XML workflow. At the end of the session they had enough knowledge to speak about XML with confidence.

During the session detailed slides were presented and discussed. A packed room attended and participated (the session featured a lot of great questions and answers) over the span of an hour.

Published in: Technology, News & Politics
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XML for Humans: Non-geek Discussion of a Geek-chic Topic

  1. 1. Getting to know a bit about XML without having to dive into all the tech talk Bernard Aschwanden www.publishingsmarter.com for a print version, please email bernard@publishingsmarter.com XML for Humans: Non-geek Discussion of a Geek-chic Topic 17:52 1 @publishsmarter
  2. 2. About this session 17:52@publishsmarter 2  Intro to the basics  Define what XML is  How it is used  Why it benefits people who write and edit  Learn how clear and concise content can be created (and managed) in an XML workflow  Know the difference between an XML editor and an editor (or writer, or whomever) who knows XML  Speak about XML with confidence
  3. 3. Rule 1: Know your audience 17:52@publishsmarter 3  Here because nothing else on the agenda looked good?  Here because the topic is something you  Have a basic interest in?  Have a lot of interest in?  Love more than almost anything else on earth?  Already generally familiar with this topic?  Comfortable with HTML (even <img scr=“logo.gif” />)
  4. 4. Housekeeping and note taking 17:52@publishsmarter 4  Not all slides or topics are equally weighted  Use some, discard others  Slides speed varies (reference)  Questions? Ask along the way!  I’d love to claim errors/typos is on purpose… they isn’t, ain’t, and weren’t never; however, I’ll fix ‘em as I can…
  5. 5. About your speaker 17:52@publishsmarter 5  Publishing Smarter: President  Content strategist, publishing technologies expert, author, and geek- enough  Certified Technical Trainer  DITA  Content management  Topic-based writing  Society for Technical Communications  Vice President  STC Associate Fellow
  6. 6. Services 17:52@publishsmarter 6  We help clients:  Create great content  Manage content as an asset  Deliver content the right way  Socialize the message  Listen to the consumer  Improve experiences by helping  Create great content  Manage content as an asset  Deliver content the right way  …  By helping clients:
  7. 7. Standard disclaimer 17:52@publishsmarter 7  In the interest of brevity I will make some blanket statements to keep it simple  It’s not all 100% “the truth”, but I’ll stay close  Purists may complain  And they are wrong!  (except when they are right)
  8. 8. I will attempt this in under 150 slides @publishsmarter 17:52 8 Problems with content creators
  9. 9. Slide 1/149... They like to create content 17:52@publishsmarter 9  They create a lot, often without following style guides  They like to create as they see fit  They create in any order  They create based on all that they know  They may truly believe that template styles are for show  They format on the fly  They don’t use the right formats  They DO manually apply formats and ignore styles
  10. 10. Documentation issues (where XML may help) 17:52@publishsmarter 10  Documentation costs money  Researching and reviewing content  Software tools and training  Development of multiple outputs  Customizing materials for clients/partners  Translation of content  XML can save money AND generate revenue  There is upfront time/effort/cost/etc.  ROI has been proven  Let’s go explore XML
  11. 11. eXtensible Markup Language @publishsmarter 17:52 11 Basics of XML
  12. 12. Defining XML 17:52@publishsmarter 12  Wikipedia: Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a markup language that defines a set of rules for encoding documents in a format that is both human- readable and machine-readable  Oracle: XML is a text-based markup language that is fast becoming the standard for data interchange on the web  w3schools: XML does not do anything; it was created to structure, store, and transport information
  13. 13. The purpose of XML for documentation 17:52@publishsmarter 13  Allows for structured writing  Provides software tool independence  Separates format and content  With a standard like DITA, it goes even further (another full presentation, but I will touch on this...)
  14. 14. XML supports structured writing 17:52@publishsmarter 14  Structure implies a set of defined rules (law, math, engineering, grammar)  Writing implies the creation of content  Structured content consistently follows the rules  A good foundation results in a happy home
  15. 15. Improve quality, reduce costs, increase profit 17:52@publishsmarter 15  Long term benefits offset short term costs  Docs can be created, modified, versioned, stored, published, translated, customized, distributed, etc. easily  Content can be programmatically modified or assembled  Some tasks can be automated  Heck, you may already by ‘structured’ but not in XML  Or you may be using XML, and not even know it yet
  16. 16. Some (relatively) basic XML code @publishsmarter 17:52 16 Exploring the code
  17. 17. What does it look like? 17:52@publishsmarter 17  Looks a lot like HTML (or it can)  <p>This sample <i>ain’t</i> perfect; just basic ideas.</p> It’s a <p>aragraph, and has some <i>talic content in it. The </i>talic content ends, then the </p>aragraph ends.  <img src=“logo.gif” height=“100” width=“50” />  Let’s dissect an element Part Function img Name of the element src Name of an attribute logo.gif Value of the attribute
  18. 18. What does it look like? 17:52@publishsmarter 18  Looks a lot like HTML (or it can)  <p>This sample <i>ain’t</i> perfect; just basic ideas.</p> It’s a <p>aragraph, and has some <i>talic content in it. The </i>talic content ends, then the </p>aragraph ends.  <img src=“logo.gif” height=“100” width=“50” />  Let’s dissect an element Part Function img Name of the element src Name of an attribute logo.gif Value of the attribute
  19. 19. What does it look like? 17:52@publishsmarter 19  Looks a lot like HTML (or it can)  <p>This sample <i>ain’t</i> perfect; just basic ideas.</p> It’s a <p>aragraph, and has some <i>talic content in it. The </i>talic content ends, then the </p>aragraph ends.  <img src=“logo.gif” height=“100” width=“50” />  Let’s dissect an element Part Function img Name of the element src Name of an attribute logo.gif Value of the attribute
  20. 20. What does it look like? 17:52@publishsmarter 20  Looks a lot like HTML (or it can)  <p>This sample <i>ain’t</i> perfect; just basic ideas.</p> It’s a <p>aragraph, and has some <i>talic content in it. The </i>talic content ends, then the </p>aragraph ends.  <img src=“logo.gif” height=“100” width=“50” />  Let’s dissect an element Part Function img Name of the element src Name of an attribute logo.gif Value of the attribute
  21. 21. What does it look like? 17:52@publishsmarter 21  Looks a lot like HTML (or it can)  <p>This sample <i>ain’t</i> perfect; just basic ideas.</p> It’s a <p>aragraph, and has some <i>talic content in it. The </i>talic content ends, then the </p>aragraph ends.  <img src=“logo.gif” height=“100” width=“50” />  Let’s dissect an element Part Function img Name of the element src Name of an attribute logo.gif Value of the attribute
  22. 22. Some (slightly complex) basic XML code @publishsmarter 17:52 22 Digging a bit deeper
  23. 23. It can look a lot more complex though 17:52@publishsmarter 23 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?> <p:sld xmlns:a="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/drawingml/2006/main" xmlns:r="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/officeDocument/2006/relationships" xmlns:p="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/presentationml/2006/main"><p:c Sld> <p:spTree> <p:nvGrpSpPr> <p:cNvPr id="1" name=""/> <p:cNvGrpSpPr/> <p:nvPr/> </p:nvGrpSpPr> <p:sp> <p:nvSpPr> <p:cNvPr id="2" name="Title 1"/> <p:cNvSpPr> <a:spLocks noGrp="1"/> </p:cNvSpPr> <p:nvPr> <p:ph type="title"/> </p:nvPr> </p:nvSpPr> <p:spPr/> <p:txBody> <a:bodyPr/> <a:lstStyle/> <a:p> <a:r> <a:rPr lang="en-CA" smtClean="0"/> <a:t>It can look a LOT more complex though</a:t> </a:r> <a:endParaRPr lang="en-CA“ /> </a:p> </p:txBody>  This is actually part of the XML for the current slide with JUST the title in it  This is from the XML file that is behind the scenes in PowerPoint (and most MS Office products)  Technically, if you use Word, Excel, or PowerPoint, you use XML. Technically.
  24. 24. Looking at XML versions of MS Office 17:52@publishsmarter 24 1. Take any *.docx, *.pptx, or *.xlsx and make a copy
  25. 25. Looking at XML versions of MS Office 17:52@publishsmarter 25 1. Take any *.docx, *.pptx, or *.xlsx and make a copy 2. Rename it *.zip
  26. 26. Looking at XML versions of MS Office 17:52@publishsmarter 26 1. Take any *.docx, *.pptx, or *.xlsx and make a copy 2. Rename it *.zip 3. Open it up and explore (in PowerPoint, start @ ppt)
  27. 27. Explore the slides folder 17:52@publishsmarter 27
  28. 28. XML View: The title of slide 1 17:52@publishsmarter 28 <p:txBody> <a:bodyPr/> <a:lstStyle/> <a:p> <a:r> <a:rPr lang="en-CA" /> <a:t>XML for Humans: Non-geek Discussion of a Geek-chic Topic</a:t> </a:r> <a:endParaRPr lang="en- CA"/> </a:p> </p:txBody>
  29. 29. XML View: The body of slide 1 17:52@publishsmarter 29 <p:txBody> <a:bodyPr/> <a:lstStyle/> <a:p> <a:r> <a:rPr lang="en-CA"/> <a:t>Bernard Aschwanden</a:t> </a:r> </a:p> <a:p> <a:endParaRPr lang="en-CA"/> </a:p> <a:p> <a:r> <a:rPr lang="en-CA"/> <a:t>www.publishingsmarter.com</a:t> </a:r> </a:p> <a:p> <a:endParaRPr lang="en-CA"/> </a:p> <a:p> <a:r> <a:rPr lang="en-CA"/> <a:t>bernard@publishingsmarter.com</a:t> </a:r> <a:endParaRPr lang="en-CA"/> </a:p> </p:txBody>
  30. 30. Human usable XML might look moe like this 17:52@publishsmarter 30 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE task PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DITA Task//EN" "technicalContent/dtd/task.dtd" []> <task id="id_t_lighting_lvl"> <title>Adjust lighting levels</title> <shortdesc>Room or seat brightness can be individually configured.</shortdesc> <taskbody> <context><indexterm audience="EndUser">lighting</indexterm><p audience="EndUser“> For safety, admins can override preferences.</p><p audience="Administrator">You can override any personal preferences.</p></context> <steps> <step><cmd>Select <uicontrol>Lighting Configuration</uicontrol>.</cmd></step> <step><cmd>Tap <uicontrol>Layout</uicontrol>.</cmd> <info audience="Administrator"> <p>To set global levels, tap <uicontrol>Override all Layouts</uicontrol>.</p> </info> </step> <step> <cmd>Tap the appropriate light level or configuration.</cmd> </step> </steps> </taskbody> </task>
  31. 31. Reading it can be pretty simple (ignore code) 17:52@publishsmarter 31 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE task PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DITA Task//EN" "technicalContent/dtd/task.dtd" []> <task id="id_t_lighting_lvl"> <title>Adjust lighting levels</title> <shortdesc>Room or seat brightness can be individually configured.</shortdesc> <taskbody> <context><indexterm audience="EndUser">lighting</indexterm><p audience="EndUser"> For safety, admins can override preferences.</p><p audience="Administrator">You can override any personal preferences.</p></context> <steps> <step><cmd>Select <uicontrol>Lighting Configuration</uicontrol>.</cmd></step> <step><cmd>Tap <uicontrol>Layout</uicontrol>.</cmd> <info audience="Administrator"> <p>To set global levels, tap <uicontrol>Override all Layouts</uicontrol>.</p> </info> </step> <step> <cmd>Tap the appropriate light level or configuration.</cmd> </step> </steps> </taskbody> </task>
  32. 32. Structure has some human-friendly feel to it 17:52@publishsmarter 32 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE task PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DITA Task//EN" "technicalContent/dtd/task.dtd" []> <task id="id_t_lighting_lvl"> <title>Adjust lighting levels</title> <shortdesc>Room or seat brightness can be individually configured.</shortdesc> <taskbody> <context><indexterm audience="EndUser">lighting</indexterm><p audience="EndUser"> For safety, admins can override preferences.</p><p audience="Administrator">You can override any personal preferences.</p></context> <steps> <step><cmd>Select <uicontrol>Lighting Configuration</uicontrol>.</cmd></step> <step><cmd>Tap <uicontrol>Layout</uicontrol>.</cmd> <info audience="Administrator"> <p>To set global levels, tap <uicontrol>Override all Layouts</uicontrol>.</p> </info> </step> <step> <cmd>Tap the appropriate light level or configuration.</cmd> </step> </steps> </taskbody> </task>
  33. 33. You can even understand the attributes 17:52@publishsmarter 33 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE task PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DITA Task//EN" "technicalContent/dtd/task.dtd" []> <task id="id_t_lighting_lvl"> <title>Adjust lighting levels</title> <shortdesc>Room or seat brightness can be individually configured.</shortdesc> <taskbody> <context><indexterm audience="EndUser">lighting</indexterm><p audience="EndUser"> For safety, admins can override preferences.</p><p audience="Administrator">You can override any personal preferences.</p></context> <steps> <step><cmd>Select <uicontrol>Lighting Configuration</uicontrol>.</cmd></step> <step><cmd>Tap <uicontrol>Layout</uicontrol>.</cmd> <info audience="Administrator"> <p>To set global levels, tap <uicontrol>Override all Layouts</uicontrol>.</p> </info> </step> <step> <cmd>Tap the appropriate light level or configuration.</cmd> </step> </steps> </taskbody> </task>
  34. 34. Remember that XML provides a division 17:52@publishsmarter 34 Format Content
  35. 35. With XML you spend your time wisely 17:52@publishsmarter 35
  36. 36. Content is manageable (size) 17:52@publishsmarter 36 Format Function *.fm FrameMaker *.txt Plain text *.docx Word *.xml Structure, store, transport
  37. 37. Content is manageable (CCMS) 17:52@publishsmarter 37
  38. 38. Many editors (tools) support XML @publishsmarter 17:52 38 Real world work with XML
  39. 39. Notepad. You can edit with Notepad. Woo. Hoo. 17:52@publishsmarter 39
  40. 40. Code view if you want/need it 17:52@publishsmarter 40
  41. 41. Code view is only one option 17:52@publishsmarter 41
  42. 42. Across multiple tools 17:52@publishsmarter 42
  43. 43. Mainstream tools offer a lot of support 17:52@publishsmarter 43
  44. 44. All the code is still there... 17:52@publishsmarter 44
  45. 45. XML makes it easier to focus on details @publishsmarter 17:52 45 Working with specific content
  46. 46. You can choose to show JUST the EndUser 17:52@publishsmarter 46
  47. 47. Show and hide based on attributes and values 17:52@publishsmarter 47
  48. 48. Or choose just Administrator content 17:52@publishsmarter 48
  49. 49. Display audience specific content 17:52@publishsmarter 49
  50. 50. Net benefit of two topics, one source 17:52@publishsmarter 50  Less editing  Fewer edits  Less review time  Quicker approvals  Fewer overall words to manage
  51. 51. Pull together what you need @publishsmarter 17:52 51 Quick and easy to assemble
  52. 52. Linear writing versus topic-based (DITA) 17:52@publishsmarter 52
  53. 53. This means that you can... 17:52@publishsmarter 53  Open a single instance of a topic  Edit only what is relevant, and based on specific context  In DITA, for example:Attribute General purpose audience Supports conditional processing for filtering or flagging. For example, EndUser or Administrator importance obsolete | deprecated | optional | default | low | normal | high | recommended | required | urgent status new | changed | deleted | unchanged translate yes | no
  54. 54. Many XML topics can come together 17:52@publishsmarter 54 TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK TOPIC REFERENCECONCEPT TASK
  55. 55. It is not output restrictive
  56. 56. It is not device dependent
  57. 57. Summing up the discussion, and options to continue it. @publishsmarter 17:52 57 Conclusion and contact
  58. 58. About this session 17:52@publishsmarter 58  Intro to the basics  Define what XML is  How it is used  Why it benefits people who write and edit  Learn how clear and concise content can be created (and managed) in an XML workflow  Know the difference between an XML editor and an editor who knows XML  Speak about XML with confidence
  59. 59. Final request 17:52@publishsmarter 59  Please suggest these slides to others  If there are any problems with them, please let me know  Remember my disclaimer at the beginning  Not all slides are equal: Use some, discard others  In the interest of brevity I make some blanket statements  It’s not all 100% “the truth”, but I’ll stay close  Purists may complain  And they are wrong!  (except when they are right)
  60. 60. Follow up contact information 17:52@publishsmarter 60 905 833 8448 (Eastern Time) bernard@publishingsmarter.com www.linkedin.com/in/bernardaschwanden @publishsmarter www.publishingsmarter.com

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