Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Local Alcohol Profiles for England (LAPE) commentary February 2018

1,102 views

Published on

Local Alcohol Profiles for England (LAPE) short statistical commentary for the February 2018 update.

Published in: Healthcare
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Local Alcohol Profiles for England (LAPE) commentary February 2018

  1. 1. Local Alcohol Profiles for England https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/local-alcohol-profiles Responsible statistician/product lead: Mark.Robinson@phe.gov.uk For queries relating to this document, please contact: lape@phe.gov.uk First published: February 2018 © Crown copyright 2018 Re-use of Crown copyright material (excluding logos) is allowed under the terms of the Open Government Licence, visit www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/2/ for terms and conditions
  2. 2. LocalAlcohol Profiles for England: February 2018 Main Findings - In 2016/17 in England there were 1.14 million hospital admissions where the primary or any secondary reason for admission was linked to alcohol (broad measure). - The rate of hospital admissions where the main reason for admission was attributed to alcohol (narrow measure) fell by 1.6% in the latest year although the trend remains broadly flat. - Admissions where the main reason for admission is attributed to alcohol (narrow measure) are highest in the 40- 64 age group (156,000 admissions in 2016/17). - Hospital admissions for conditions solely caused by alcohol consumption in the under 18s continued to fall in 2016/17. - Chronic conditions which are partly but not wholly caused by alcohol are the majority of alcohol-related hospital admissions. Cardiovascular diseases are responsible for the most admissions in this group. 2 What’s new in LAPE? The Local Alcohol Profiles for England have been updated with 2016/17 hospital admissions data including alcohol-specific admissions, alcohol-related admissions and breakdowns by age group and condition. Methods used in LAPE Information about the methods used to generate the indicators in LAPE can be found in the definitions tab on the LAPE site - https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/local-alcohol- profiles A full explanation of alcohol-attributable fractions and indicator revisions can be found in the LAPE User Guide - https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/documents/LAPE_2017_ User_Guide_071117.pdf Local Alcohol Profiles for England
  3. 3. In 2016/17, there were 337,000 hospital admissions for alcohol- related conditions on the narrow measure (see glossary). This represents a small (0.6%) fall in the number of admissions since 2015/16, only the second decrease since 2008/09. Figure 2. Admission episodes for alcohol-related conditions (Narrow measure) The rate of hospital admissions for alcohol-related conditions on the narrow measure fell by 1.6% to 636 per 100,000 in the latest year. The fall was greater in females (-2%) than males (-1.3%). LocalAlcoholProfilesforEngland:February2018 In 2016/17, there were 1,14 million alcohol-related hospital admissions on the broad definition measure (see glossary of terms) . Rates of alcohol-related hospital admissions vary across the country. The South East region had the lowest rate (1,804 per 100,000) and the North East region had the highest (2,689 per 100,000). Variation across local authorities was even greater with the lowest rate in Rutland (1,391 per 100,000) and the highest in Salford (3,497, per 100,000). Alcohol-related hospital admissions are associated with deprivation. The rate of hospital admissions on the broad definition is almost 70% higher in the most deprived 10% of local authorities than the least deprived 10%. Figure 1. Admission episodes for alcohol-related conditions (Broad measure) 3 Local Alcohol Profiles for England The broad measure gives an indication of the full impact of alcohol on hospital admissions and the burden placed on the NHS. The narrow measure estimates the number of hospital admissions which are primarily due to alcohol consumption and provides the best indication of trends in alcohol-related hospital admissions.
  4. 4. LocalAlcohol Profiles for England: February 2018 Hospital admissions for alcohol-related conditions on the narrow measure are highest in the 40-64 age group (155,800) followed by the over 65s (100,200) and the under 40s (81,200). Rates of admissions are highest in the over 65s for males. For females, the highest rates are in the 40-64 age group although the rates in the two oldest groups are beginning to converge. Figure 3. Male admission episodes for alcohol-related conditions (Narrow) Figure 4. Female admission episodes for alcohol-related conditions (Narrow) 4 Local Alcohol Profiles for England Hospital admissions for alcohol-specific conditions in the under 18s have been falling over the past decade. In the three-year period 2014/15 to 2016/17, there were 12,000 admissions, an 8% reduction on the previous three-year period. Figure 5. Under 18 admission episodes for alcohol-specific conditions In the under 18 group, more girls are admitted to hospital for alcohol-specific reasons than boys. In the most recent three- year period there were 7,000 female admissions compared to 5.000 male admissions. The London region has the lowest rate of alcohol-specific hospital admissions amongst under 18s (19 per 100,000) and the North East has the highest (65 per 100,000).
  5. 5. LocalAlcohol Profiles for England: February 2018 The rise in the number of alcohol-related hospital admissions has been driven by an increase in admissions from chronic conditions which are partially attributable to alcohol (see glossary). Figure 6. Number of alcohol-related hospital admissions (narrow measure) In 2016/17, both partially attributable chronic conditions and partially attributable acute conditions increased by 1% compared with 2015/16 whilst wholly attributable conditions fell. 5 Local Alcohol Profiles for England The majority of alcohol-related hospital admissions on the broad definition are due to chronic conditions which are partially attributable to alcohol (68%). Figure 7. Number of alcohol -related hospital admissions (broad) Figure 8. Number of alcohol-related hospital admissions (broad) - Chronic partially attributable conditions Cardiovascular disease dominates the chromic partially attributable condition group. In 2016/17, there were an estimated 576,000 alcohol-related hospital admissions from cardiovascular disease.
  6. 6. LocalAlcohol Profiles for England: February 2018 Background The Local Alcohol Profiles for England (LAPE) have been published since 2006. These profiles have been designed to help local government and health services assess the effect of alcohol use on their local populations. They inform commissioning and planning decisions to tackle alcohol use and improve the health of local communities. LAPE is an interactive data tool which enables local areas to compare and benchmark themselves http://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile/local-alcohol-profiles Methodology for all LAPE indicators is described in our user guide https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/documents/LAPE_2017_User_Guid e_071117.pdf 6 Local Alcohol Profiles for England Glossary of key terms used in LAPE Broad definition A measure of hospital admissions where either the primary diagnosis (main reason for admission) or one of the secondary (contributory) diagnoses is an alcohol-related condition. This represents a broad measure of alcohol-related admissions but is sensitive to changes in coding practice over time. Narrow definition A measure of hospital admissions where the primary diagnosis (main reason for admission) is an alcohol- related condition. This represents a narrower measure. Since every hospital admission must have a primary diagnosis it is less sensitive to coding practices but may also understate the part alcohol plays in the admission. Wholly attributable Wholly attributable conditions are those which are known to be solely caused by alcohol consumption Partially attributable A partially attributable condition is one where it is known that a proportion of the cases are caused by alcohol consumption. Examples are circulatory disease and certain cancers.

×