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Prue Addison: The Business of Biodiversity. Final Seminar

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This is my final seminar at the University of Oxford, reflecting on my 3 year Knowledge Exchange Fellowship, working with businesses to improve corporate biodiversity accountability. You can view a video of the seminar here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ys0tpGJDD8&feature=youtu.be

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Prue Addison: The Business of Biodiversity. Final Seminar

  1. 1. @prueaddison Dr Prue Addison Knowledge Exchange Fellow The business of biodiversity: conservation science multinational corporations knowledge exchange
  2. 2. Museum Victoria Synchronicity Earth
  3. 3. www.brookings.edu
  4. 4. 4 Knowledge Exchange: an emerging discipline
  5. 5. 5 Knowledge exchange process Changes to understanding Policy or practice change Impacts of policy or practice change Extent of control of scientists & KE practitioners Extent of real world impact Knowledge Exchange: an emerging discipline
  6. 6. 6Source: https://www.mpls.ox.ac.uk/public-engagement/what-is-public-engagement Achieving research impact: Informing > Consulting > Collaborating > Co-production
  7. 7. Why work in the business & biodiversity space?
  8. 8. The sustainable business edit Operational Regulatory & legal Reputational Financing New market opportunities Motivations Why businesses & biodiversity? 8
  9. 9. The sustainable business edit World Economic Forum Global Risks Report 2019 9 Why businesses & biodiversity?
  10. 10. The sustainable business edit 10 Why businesses & biodiversity? United Nations (2017) United Nations Global Compact Progress Report: Business Solutions to Sustainable Development
  11. 11. How are businesses accounting for their biodiversity impacts?
  12. 12. 12 The state of corporate biodiversity accountability lance… How is biodiversity treated by the world’s biggest companies? We analyzed the nability reports of the Fortune Global 100 companies 49 companies mentioned biodiversity or biodiversity related issues, and an additional 16 companies mentioned sustainable forestry or fishing (with no mention of biodiversity) op 100 companies, 86 have publicly available sustainability reports: Represent 15 sectors, dominated by the financial sector (23 companies) and the energy sector (21 companies) Have headquarters located in 15 countries, dominated by USA (38 companies) and China (19 companies) Total revenue = US$12.6 trillion Total employees = 26.4 million staff 6 Fortune 0 Global 31 companies had a clearly stated biodiversity commitments, and an additional 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 2016 Fortune 100 companies 31 companies (e.g. energy) 32 companies (e.g. finance) 37 companies (e.g. healthcare) H M L Representation in biodiversity risk sectors Commitments made 49 companies mentioned biodiversity in their sustainabilityreports. 5 companies had biodiversity commitments that are specific, measurable,& time-bound. Actions & indicators 9 companies quantitatively reported biodiversity- related activities. e.g., sustainable sourcing of resources,& avoidance ofprotected areas. No companies reported on quantitative outcomes of their activities for biodiversity, making it difficult to assess whether business actions are achieving positive outcomes for nature. 49 companies qualitatively reported biodiversity- related activities. e.g., habitats restored, & partnerships formed. Addison et al (2018). Cons Biol. 33, 307–318.
  13. 13. How can a knowledge exchange fellowship help business tackle biodiversity loss?
  14. 14. 14 2016 - 2019
  15. 15. 15 Aim: to provide targeted science- based biodiversity solutions that can be used by businesses, and the practitioners who they work with, to drive improvements in the practice of corporate biodiversity accountability 2016 - 2019
  16. 16. Our conservation science: 16 Protect Conserve Mitigate Avoid Minimise Restore Offset Mitigation Hierarchy
  17. 17. Improving corporate biodiversity accountability: Developing science-based corporate biodiversity commitments Developing biodiversity indicators to evaluate achievement of corporate biodiversity commitments and effectiveness of actions Expanding and deepening business action for biodiversity 17
  18. 18. What businesses would work with academics?
  19. 19. KE Fellowship Partners (planned) 19
  20. 20. KE Fellowship Partners (actual) 20
  21. 21. Key collaborations
  22. 22. Improving corporate biodiversity accountability: biodiversity commitments biodiversity indicators business action 22
  23. 23. 23 biodiversity commitments What is the latest science behind ”no net loss” goal setting and indicator development? BP Group Ecology Expert: “Our work with Oxford has been invaluable not only in making sure that our practices are underpinned by good science, but also in helping to justify improvements in the way we work to senior executives” BP Group-wide Guidelines on Managing Biodiversity (2018), setting out how a commitment to NNL on biodiversity can be made and achieved for projects
  24. 24. 24 business action How can we help make the international biodiversity goals become significantly more visible and relevant to everyday business activities?
  25. 25. 25 business action
  26. 26. 26 business action
  27. 27. 27 business action
  28. 28. 28 business action
  29. 29. 29 business action JNCC staff member: “the infographic itself has been invaluable at demonstrating how nature conservation interventions also crosswalk into sustainable development … [and the collaboration has] certainly led to new approaches that JNCC and DEFRA have considered [for] private sector input into the development of post-2020 framework”
  30. 30. 30 biodiversity indicators How can businesses be better supported in developing biodiversity indicators?
  31. 31. 31 biodiversity indicators A spectrum of business applications for biodiversity indicators:
  32. 32. 32 biodiversity indicators Critical elements to help differentiate and select fit-for-purpose biodiversity indicators for business:
  33. 33. 33 biodiversity indicators 1: Clarify the decision context 2: Set management objectives 3: Explore & set management actions 4: Develop or select indicators 5: Monitor, assess & report 6: Adapt & refine
  34. 34. 34 biodiversity indicators
  35. 35. 35 biodiversity indicators Research influence: • Work presented to > 300 business & NGO representatives in 2018 • Integration into 2 other international initiatives leading the development of biodiversity indicators for the extractives and finance sector in 2018 & 2019 • Informed the establishment of an international working group “Aligning measured for business” • Foundation for IUCN draft “Guidelines for Planning and Monitoring Corporate Biodiversity Performance”
  36. 36. Improving corporate biodiversity accountability: Developing science-based corporate biodiversity commitments Developing biodiversity indicators to evaluate achievement of corporate biodiversity commitments and effectiveness of actions Expanding and deepening business action for biodiversity 36
  37. 37. Key KE outcomes
  38. 38. 39 5 critical factors for successful knowledge exchange
  39. 39. 1: Build & maintain networks 40
  40. 40. 2: Develop collaborative partnerships 41 Research Practice
  41. 41. 42 Research Councils UK, Pathways to Impact • Passion • Communication • Trust • Power 3: Master social dynamics
  42. 42. 43 4: Seek institutional support Cvitanovic et al. 2019. Environmental Science & Policy. 94: 20-31 Creating a New Kind of Science in Academia Produce not only professors but also future environmental leaders Keeler et al, 2017. BioScience, 67: 591-592
  43. 43. 5: Evaluate & learn 44 Knight et al (in prep) Knowledge exchange process Changes to understanding Policy or practice change Impacts of policy or practice change Extent of control over that being evaluated Extent of real world impact
  44. 44. 45 5 critical factors for successful knowledge exchange 1: Build & maintain networks 2: Develop collaborative partnerships 3: Master social dynamics 4: Seek institutional support 5: Evaluate and learn
  45. 45. Thank you
  46. 46. Thank you! Knowledge Exchange @ Oxford 300 × 340
  47. 47. Thank you! prue.addison@zoo.ox.ac.uk @prueaddison

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