Open Access is Here to Stay

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Open Access presentation by Vanessa Proudman at the Breda University of Applied Sciences, the Netherlands. As part of Open Access Week 2013.

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Open Access is Here to Stay

  1. 1. Open Access Is here to stay Open Access Week 2013, NHTV, NL Vanessa Proudman, Proud2Know vanessaproudman@proud2know.eu
  2. 2. Overview   What Open Access is   The changing context of scholarly comms   When I publish   Caring for my visibility & impact   Library support   What’s next
  3. 3. What is Open Access? “ Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. What makes it possible is the internet and the consent of the author or copyright-holder” A very brief introduction to Open Access. Peter Suber
  4. 4. … sign here
  5. 5. Open Access empowers
  6. 6. THE CHANGING CONTEXT OF SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION
  7. 7. Budapest Open Access Initiative, 2001   “Open access is economically feasible, it gives readers extraordinary power to find and make use of relevant literature, and it gives authors and their works vast and measureable new visibility, readership, and impact.” www.soros.org/openaccess
  8. 8. Arxiv.org, 1991
  9. 9. Sets of licenses since 2012
  10. 10. Creative Commons
  11. 11. Open Access repositories, 2000   Provide digital access to research   Through an interoperable framework (OAI-PMH)   Institutions and subject communities   > 2500 repositories since 2000   Creating a global database of openly-accessible research
  12. 12. Expertbase
  13. 13. Directory of Open Access Repositories
  14. 14. Open Access journals   Content available to readers free of charge   Some journals charge a publishing fee   Although more than 50% do not   To date, over 8000 OA journals (doaj.org) vs over 65,000 a total of peer-reviewed journals
  15. 15. Springer Open
  16. 16. BioMed Central
  17. 17. OA: Jacco Bikker
  18. 18. OA: M. Landré and P. Peeters
  19. 19. Open Journals System (OJS)
  20. 20. Ubiquity Press
  21. 21. DOAJ
  22. 22. The choice in journals is increasing from Laakso, M., & Björk, B.-C. (2012). Anatomy of open access publishing: a study of longitudinal development and internal structure. BMC Medicine, 10(1), 124. doi:10.1186/1741-7015-10-124
  23. 23. Pubmed Central
  24. 24. SCOAP3
  25. 25. Knowledge Unlatched
  26. 26. Open Access Books
  27. 27. FUNDERS AND INSTITUTIONS ARE SUPPORTING THIS CHANGE
  28. 28. Wellcome Trust Mandate, 2005
  29. 29. NIH Public Access Policy, 2008
  30. 30. The Finch Report (UK), 2012
  31. 31. RCUK Open Access Policy, 2012
  32. 32. NWO Open Access Policy
  33. 33. NWO
  34. 34. NWO Publicaties
  35. 35. NWO Conferentiebijdrage
  36. 36. Open ACCESS PILOT FP7
  37. 37. OpenAIRE
  38. 38. EU Horizon 2020
  39. 39. ROARMAP OA mandate growth 3/13
  40. 40. EUR Open Access Policy
  41. 41. Open Access Fund
  42. 42. WHEN I PUBLISH
  43. 43. Open Access publishing choices   Gold Open Access Publishing   The Hybrid Model   Green Self-Archiving   Disciplinary dissemination   Overlay journals
  44. 44. Routes to Open Access Green self-archiving Gold publishing Publish a refereed journal article in an institutional repository, a regional repository or disciplinary one Provide free, immediate access to articles or books. Hybrid journals provide Gold OA for authors who pay an up-front-fee to publish on their journals’ website.
  45. 45. CARING FOR YOUR VISIBILITY AND IMPACT
  46. 46. The PEER Project   Investigated the potential effects of the large-scale, systematic depositing of authors final peer-reviewed manuscripts on reader access, author visibility, and journal viability, and EU research   Increase in traffic by 11% to pub version
  47. 47. Citations Engineering 20   18   16   14   12   10   8   6   4   2   0   OA   Non-­‐OA   2000   2001   2002   2003   2004   2005   2006   2007   2008   Data: Gargouri & Harnad, 2010
  48. 48. Citations Clinical medicine Data: Gargouri & Harnad, 2010
  49. 49. Citations Social science Data: Gargouri & Harnad, 2010
  50. 50. Citation impact Ref: A. Swan Open Access Seminar, Bergen, Norway, 25/26 September 2013
  51. 51. Ref: A. Swan Open Access Seminar, Bergen, Norway, 25/26 September 2013
  52. 52. Ray Frost’s impact Ref: A. Swan Open Access Seminar, Bergen, Norway, 25/26 September 2013
  53. 53. Altmetrics
  54. 54. LIBRARY SUPPORT
  55. 55. University of Southampton Support
  56. 56. Writing, Johns Hopkins Sheridan Libraries
  57. 57. Sherpa/ROMEO
  58. 58. Green Elsevier
  59. 59. NHTV’s Copyright Information Point
  60. 60. Open Access at UCL
  61. 61. Open Access for RCUK Research
  62. 62. Open Access Fund
  63. 63. QUT
  64. 64. QUT 2
  65. 65. TU Delft’s patentportfolio
  66. 66. What can you do as an author?   Deposit your articles in an open access archive   Submit your article to OA journals   Consider launching an OA journal   Consider launching a subject repository   If you are a journal editor, referee or author, discuss OA and lobby for more OA experimentation

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