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Pink or Blue?
Examining gender sensitivity in games
Julie Evans
@JulieEvans_PT
CEO, Project Tomorrow
March 8, 2016
Today’s Workshop:
 Introduction to today’s workshop
 Setting the context with research data
 Reviewing gender terminolo...
Mission: To ensure
that today’s students
are prepared to
become tomorrow’s
leaders, innovators
and engaged citizens
of the...
Our Programs:
Focus on learning experiences – in and out of school
o Research & evaluation studies
o School & community pr...
www.brainpop.com
BrainPOP
Be part of the discussion!
@SXSWEDU #sxswedu2016
@SpeakUpEd
@BrainPOP
#pinkbluegames
Workshop Goals:
 Explore if gender differences exist in how girls and
boys approach digital learning
 Learn about gender...
Late afternoon warm up activity
Three truths and a lie
Are there gender
differences in how
girls and boys use
technology for
learning?
With a neighbor, first discuss this questi...
Three truths and a lie
Which one is not true?
1. Boys are more likely to rate their technology skills
as advanced than gir...
Are there gender differences in how girls
and boys use technology for learning?
Setting the context
Speak Up Research Proj...
Annual research project
 Using online surveys + focus groups
 Surveys for: K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents,
Administrat...
 Learning & Teaching with Technology
 College and Career Ready Skills
 Students’ Career Interests in STEM
 Professiona...
K-12 Students 415,686
Teachers & Librarians 38,613
Parents (in English & Spanish) 40,218
School/District Administrators/Te...
 Students function as a “Digital Advance Team”
 Students regularly adopt and adapt emerging
technologies for learning
 ...
Social–based learning
Un–tethered learning
Digitally–rich learning
Students & Digital Learning
Personalized
Learning
Stude...
Current uses of technology for learning
Four types of technology usage by students:
 In school:
o teacher directed
o stud...
Sample Digital Activities
Gr 6-8
Girls
Gr 6-8
Boys
Take tests online 64% 61%
Use Google Apps for Education 48% 46%
Watch t...
Using technology in my classes
increases my interest in learning
Agree:
54% of boys in
middle school
students
52% of girls...
In their own words … how both girls and boys value
digital learning
As a result of using technology for learning, I am …
D...
0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%
Online classes
Tablets
Digital textbooks
Games
Schoolwide Internet
Gr 9-12 Boys Gr ...
Current uses of technology for learning
Four types of technology usage by students:
 In school:
o teacher directed
o stud...
Sample Digital Activities
Grades
6-8 Girls
Grades
6-8 Boys
Look up info on a mobile device
– in class
45% 37%
Text classma...
Designing the ultimate science classroom – what would
be most effective for your learning?
Boys say:
 Having a
teacher wi...
Are you interested in a career in a STEM field?
24%
17%
38%
21%
17%
15%
36%
32%
Not interested
No opinion
Somewhat interes...
What would be most helpful in
exploring a STEM career?
Girls Boys
Traditional Approaches:
o Get real life experience – p/t...
Student interest in learning how to code
Yes, I am interested
in learning how to
code or program a
computer
Girls Boys
Gra...
Students’ perceptions of their technology skills:
differences by grade grouping and gender
Advanced Average Beginner
Gr 3-...
Students’ use of digital tools to self-direct learning outside
of school
Typical activities:
o Research a website to learn...
Students’ use of digital tools to self-direct learning outside
of school
o Play an online game or virtual simulation activ...
Let’s play a game!
Win the Whitehouse
https://www.brainpop.com/games/
winthewhitehouse/
Gender terminology
Relative to education and learning
Gender sensitive
Gender
responsive
Gender transformative
Gender
awar...
Gender terminology
Relative to education and learning
Gender sensitive
Gender blind
Gender specific
Gender unequal
Gender terminology
Relative to education and learning
Gender sensitive: takes into account impact of programs,
products, p...
Worksheet: Thinking about gender issues in games
Type of
gender-
responsiveness
Your assessment Group discussion
notes
Gen...
Defining gender sensitivity:
 Considers gender norms, role and relationships
 Takes into account impact of policies, pro...
Evaluating the gender-sensitivity of digital content
Questions for Consideration Guide (Worksheet)
Characterization
Are th...
Girls and boys value game play differently
Girls:
1. Games increase my interest in school
2. Games provide a more interest...
Let’s play more games!
Pearl Diver:
https://jr.brainpop.com/games/pearldiver/
Say What:
https://jr.brainpop.com/games/sayw...
Let’s play more games!
How did you evaluate the gender-
sensitivity of these games?
What did you learn about gender-
sensi...
Thinking about designing, implementing and evaluating
games
o Know your audience
o Look through alternative lenses
o Under...
Your
thoughts,
ideas,
questions
Today’s Workshop:
 Introduction to today’s workshop
 Setting the context with research data
 Reviewing gender terminolo...
Three truths and a lie
Which one is not true?
1. Boys are more likely to rate their technology skills
as advanced than gir...
Three truths and a lie
Which one is not true?
1. Boys are more likely to rate their technology skills
as advanced than gir...
National Speak Up reports and infographics
Targeted and thematic reports
Digital learning trends
Mobile learning & social ...
Online surveys for:
o K-12 students – individual + group
o Parents – English and Spanish
o Teachers
o Librarians/Media Spe...
Thank you for this discussion today!
For additional information about Speak Up please
contact:
Julie Evans
jevans@tomorrow...
Pink or Blue: Examining Gender Sensitivity in Games
Pink or Blue: Examining Gender Sensitivity in Games
Pink or Blue: Examining Gender Sensitivity in Games
Pink or Blue: Examining Gender Sensitivity in Games
Pink or Blue: Examining Gender Sensitivity in Games
Pink or Blue: Examining Gender Sensitivity in Games
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Pink or Blue: Examining Gender Sensitivity in Games

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Pink or Blue: Examining Gender Sensitivity in Games
SxSWEdu, March 8, 2016.

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Pink or Blue: Examining Gender Sensitivity in Games

  1. 1. Pink or Blue? Examining gender sensitivity in games Julie Evans @JulieEvans_PT CEO, Project Tomorrow March 8, 2016
  2. 2. Today’s Workshop:  Introduction to today’s workshop  Setting the context with research data  Reviewing gender terminology and issues  Let’s play some games!  Your ideas/comments/questions
  3. 3. Mission: To ensure that today’s students are prepared to become tomorrow’s leaders, innovators and engaged citizens of the world Project Tomorrow, a global education non-profit organization
  4. 4. Our Programs: Focus on learning experiences – in and out of school o Research & evaluation studies o School & community programs o Policy advocacy for STEM and digital learning
  5. 5. www.brainpop.com BrainPOP
  6. 6. Be part of the discussion! @SXSWEDU #sxswedu2016 @SpeakUpEd @BrainPOP #pinkbluegames
  7. 7. Workshop Goals:  Explore if gender differences exist in how girls and boys approach digital learning  Learn about gender-sensitivity within digital content and games used for learning  Gain first hand experience evaluating gender- sensitivity within game play  Explore new considerations for how to design, implement and/or evaluate game-based learning with greater gender-sensitivity
  8. 8. Late afternoon warm up activity
  9. 9. Three truths and a lie
  10. 10. Are there gender differences in how girls and boys use technology for learning? With a neighbor, first discuss this question:
  11. 11. Three truths and a lie Which one is not true? 1. Boys are more likely to rate their technology skills as advanced than girls. 2. More girls than boys say they are interested in participating in an after school STEM program. 3. Girls and boys in elementary school are more interested in learning how to code than their older peers. 4. Girls are playing online or digital games more frequently than boys to self-direct learning.
  12. 12. Are there gender differences in how girls and boys use technology for learning? Setting the context Speak Up Research Project findings from 415,000 K-12 students from fall 2015
  13. 13. Annual research project  Using online surveys + focus groups  Surveys for: K-12 Students, Teachers, Parents, Administrators, Community Members  Special: Pre-Service Teachers in Schools of Education  Open for all K-12 schools and schools of education  Schools, districts & colleges receive free report with their own data  Questions about how eLearning = 21c education Speak Up Research Project 4.5 million surveys since 2003 Data informs: policies, programs, funding at local, state and federal levels
  14. 14.  Learning & Teaching with Technology  College and Career Ready Skills  Students’ Career Interests in STEM  Professional Development / Teacher Preparation  Internet Safety / Data Privacy Issues / Homework Gap  Administrators’ Challenges / Bandwidth Capacity  Emerging Technologies both in & out of the Classroom  Mobile Devices, Online Learning, Digital Content, E-texts  Educational Games, Social Media tools and apps  New Classroom Models, Print to Digital, Online Assessments  Designing the Ultimate School/Classroom Speak Up survey question themes
  15. 15. K-12 Students 415,686 Teachers & Librarians 38,613 Parents (in English & Spanish) 40,218 School/District Administrators/Tech Leaders 4,536 Community Members 6,623 About the participating schools & districts o 7,825 schools and 2,676 districts o 25% urban / 35% rural / 40% suburban o All 50 states + DC + Guam + DODEA schools Speak Up 2015 national participation: 505,676
  16. 16.  Students function as a “Digital Advance Team”  Students regularly adopt and adapt emerging technologies for learning  Students’ frustrations focus on the unsophisticated use of technologies within education  Persistent digital disconnect between students and adults  Exacerbation of lack of relevancy in current education  Students want a more personalized learning environment What have we learned over the past 13 years?
  17. 17. Social–based learning Un–tethered learning Digitally–rich learning Students & Digital Learning Personalized Learning Student Vision for Digital Learning
  18. 18. Current uses of technology for learning Four types of technology usage by students:  In school: o teacher directed o student self – initiated  Out of school time: o supporting schoolwork o supporting personal learning
  19. 19. Sample Digital Activities Gr 6-8 Girls Gr 6-8 Boys Take tests online 64% 61% Use Google Apps for Education 48% 46% Watch teacher created videos 31% 29% Use online curriculum 17% 18% What are examples of teacher-facilitated technology use by students?
  20. 20. Using technology in my classes increases my interest in learning Agree: 54% of boys in middle school students 52% of girls in middle school
  21. 21. In their own words … how both girls and boys value digital learning As a result of using technology for learning, I am … Developing new skills • Creativity • Critical thinking and problem solving Changing my learning behavior • More likely to complete homework • Collaborating more with my classmates • Communicating with my teacher more often • Participating more in class discussions Enhancing my self-efficacy as a learner • Learning at my own pace • Learning in a way that fits my learning style • In control over my learning
  22. 22. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Online classes Tablets Digital textbooks Games Schoolwide Internet Gr 9-12 Boys Gr 9-12 Girls Gr 6-8 Boys Gr 6-8 Girls Girls and boys share a common vision for the use of technology in their ultimate school
  23. 23. Current uses of technology for learning Four types of technology usage by students:  In school: o teacher directed o student self – initiated  Out of school time: o supporting schoolwork o supporting personal learning
  24. 24. Sample Digital Activities Grades 6-8 Girls Grades 6-8 Boys Look up info on a mobile device – in class 45% 37% Text classmates for help 47% 29% Find videos to help with homework 37% 31% Take photos of assignments 29% 22% Use social media sites to facilitate peer collaborations 26% 20% What are examples of student self-directed technology use to support learning?
  25. 25. Designing the ultimate science classroom – what would be most effective for your learning? Boys say:  Having a teacher with field experiences  Doing science competitions  Using online simulations Girls say:  Taking field trips to places where science happens  Working with peers on projects  Using real tools and devices
  26. 26. Are you interested in a career in a STEM field? 24% 17% 38% 21% 17% 15% 36% 32% Not interested No opinion Somewhat interested Very interested Boys Girls
  27. 27. What would be most helpful in exploring a STEM career? Girls Boys Traditional Approaches: o Get real life experience – p/t job, internship, volunteering 77% 66% o Take field trips to see career in action 68% 58% o Participate in an after school program 41% 32% New Digital Approaches: o Watch videos about different careers 50% 50% o Play a digital or online game about a career 40% 46% o Earn a micro credential or badge 13% 22%
  28. 28. Student interest in learning how to code Yes, I am interested in learning how to code or program a computer Girls Boys Grades 3-5 55% 62% Grades 6-8 46% 57% Grades 9-12 37% 51% Sweet spot for nurturing interest is Grades 3-5!
  29. 29. Students’ perceptions of their technology skills: differences by grade grouping and gender Advanced Average Beginner Gr 3-5 Girls 22% 61% 17% Gr 3-5 Boys 34% 52% 14% Gr 6-8 Girls 19% 76% 4% Gr 6-8 Boys 34% 62% 4% Gr 9-12 Girls 19% 78% 3% Gr 9-12 Boys 37% 59% 4%
  30. 30. Students’ use of digital tools to self-direct learning outside of school Typical activities: o Research a website to learn more about a topic o Watch a video to learn how to do something o Use social media to identify people with like interests o Use online writing tools to improve writing skills o Post questions on discussion boards o Play an online game or virtual simulation activity
  31. 31. Students’ use of digital tools to self-direct learning outside of school o Play an online game or virtual simulation activity Gr 6-8 Girls Gr 6-8 Boys Gr 9-12 Girls Gr 9-12 Boys All the time + often 24% 33% 16% 24% Sometimes 33% 32% 29% 31% Rarely + never 43% 35% 56% 45%
  32. 32. Let’s play a game! Win the Whitehouse https://www.brainpop.com/games/ winthewhitehouse/
  33. 33. Gender terminology Relative to education and learning Gender sensitive Gender responsive Gender transformative Gender awareness Gender blind Gender specific Gender unequal
  34. 34. Gender terminology Relative to education and learning Gender sensitive Gender blind Gender specific Gender unequal
  35. 35. Gender terminology Relative to education and learning Gender sensitive: takes into account impact of programs, products, policies and tries to mitigate negative consequences; considers gender norms, roles Gender blind: in ability to perceive differences; ignores gender norms, roles Gender specific: intentionally targets specific group; considers gender norms, roles Gender unequal: perpetuates inequity by reinforcing norms, roles
  36. 36. Worksheet: Thinking about gender issues in games Type of gender- responsiveness Your assessment Group discussion notes Gender-unequal Gender-blind Gender-specific Gender-sensitive What are your experiences?
  37. 37. Defining gender sensitivity:  Considers gender norms, role and relationships  Takes into account impact of policies, projects and programs on women/girls and men/boys  Tries to mitigate negative consequences of the gender impact
  38. 38. Evaluating the gender-sensitivity of digital content Questions for Consideration Guide (Worksheet) Characterization Are there differences in the types of roles or activities ascribed to the characters based upon gender? Imagery and Language Is the use of language, words and phrases within the content free of traditional stereotypes or gender bias? Are loaded words used? Storyline Are women/girls or men/boys represented as central characters within the content storyline or the game? Results What types of messages are articulated in the digital content about gender differences? Are those messages positive or negative?
  39. 39. Girls and boys value game play differently Girls: 1. Games increase my interest in school 2. Games provide a more interesting way to learn 3. Games make it easier to understand difficult concepts 4. I learn more through a game 5. Games personalize my learning Boys: 1. Games make it easier to understand difficult concepts 2. Games increase my interest in school 3. Games provide a more interesting way to learn 4. Games adapt to what I know or need to know 5. I am a better thinker and problem solver when I play games
  40. 40. Let’s play more games! Pearl Diver: https://jr.brainpop.com/games/pearldiver/ Say What: https://jr.brainpop.com/games/saywhat/ Sortify: https://www.brainpop.com/games/sortifyworldchangingwomen/ Do I Have a Right?: https://www.brainpop.com/games/doihavearight/ Argument Wars: https://www.brainpop.com/games/argumentwars/
  41. 41. Let’s play more games! How did you evaluate the gender- sensitivity of these games? What did you learn about gender- sensitivity in digital content?
  42. 42. Thinking about designing, implementing and evaluating games o Know your audience o Look through alternative lenses o Understand that games have impact o Diversity of ideas and perspective is an asset – use it o Evaluate with gender differences in mind o Keep an eye on the trends and changes in the sector
  43. 43. Your thoughts, ideas, questions
  44. 44. Today’s Workshop:  Introduction to today’s workshop  Setting the context with research data  Reviewing gender terminology and issues  Let’s play some games!  Your ideas/comments/questions
  45. 45. Three truths and a lie Which one is not true? 1. Boys are more likely to rate their technology skills as advanced than girls. 2. More girls than boys say they are interested in participating in an after school STEM program. 3. Girls and boys in elementary school are more interested in learning how to code than their older peers. 4. Girls are playing online or digital games more frequently than boys to self-direct learning.
  46. 46. Three truths and a lie Which one is not true? 1. Boys are more likely to rate their technology skills as advanced than girls. 2. More girls than boys say they are interested in participating in an after school STEM program. 3. Girls and boys in elementary school are more interested in learning how to code than their older peers. 4. Girls are playing online or digital games more frequently than boys to self-direct learning.
  47. 47. National Speak Up reports and infographics Targeted and thematic reports Digital learning trends Mobile learning & social media Games in the classroom Blended learning outcomes Presentations, podcasts and webinars Services: consulting, workshops, evaluation and efficacy studies More Speak Up? www.tomorrow.org New national report to be released in April 2016
  48. 48. Online surveys for: o K-12 students – individual + group o Parents – English and Spanish o Teachers o Librarians/Media Specialists o School Site & District Administrators o Technology Leaders o Community Members All schools are invited to participate Surveys open October 2016 Participate in Speak Up! Sign up to receive information at: www.tomorrow.org
  49. 49. Thank you for this discussion today! For additional information about Speak Up please contact: Julie Evans jevans@tomorrow.org 949-609-4660 x15 Twitter: JulieEvans_PT and SpeakUpEd Copyright Project Tomorrow 2016 This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author.

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