San Diego 2010

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Power Point from the Tween Workshop for San Diego PL

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San Diego 2010

  1. 1. CONNECTING WITH TWEENS<br />NAKED READING<br />1<br />
  2. 2. 2<br />
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  4. 4. URLs for PPT<br />4<br />http://professornana.livejournal.com<br />www.slideshare.net/professornana<br />
  5. 5. Bulwer-Lyttonworst first lineannual contest2009 winners<br />
  6. 6. She walked into my office on legs as long as one of those long-legged birds that you see in Florida - the pink ones, not the white ones - except that she was standing on both of them, not just one of them, like those birds, the pink ones, and she wasn't wearing pink, but I knew right away that she was trouble, which those birds usually aren't. <br />
  7. 7. Towards the dragon's lair the fellowship marched -- a noble human prince, a fair elf, a surly dwarf, and a disheveled copyright attorney who was frantically trying to find a way to differentiate this story from "Lord of the Rings." <br />
  8. 8. On a fine summer morning during the days of the Puritans, the prison door in the small New England town of B----n opened to release a convicted adulteress, the Scarlet Letter A embroidered on her dress, along with the Scarlet Letters B through J, a veritable McGuffey's Reader of Scarlet Letters, one for each little tyke waiting for her at the gate. <br />
  9. 9. Tweens: Some Questions to Frame the Day<br />9<br />Who are these tweens?<br />Do we really need another division/category of young readers?<br />How do they differ from teens and children?<br />What can we offer them to keep them connected to books and reading?<br />
  10. 10. Close your eyes (yes… close your eyes) and take a moment to think back on… <br /><ul><li> a happy memory from when you were 10 years old
  11. 11. a sad memory from when you were 11 years old
  12. 12. an embarrassing memory from when you were 12 years old
  13. 13. a great memory from when you were 13 years old
  14. 14. a “traumatic” memory from when you were 14 years old</li></ul>10<br />
  15. 15. Now take a moment to share one of those memories with the person to your right and left….<br />How different were your memories from the person next to you? They may have been very different or there may have been some similarities.<br />11<br />
  16. 16. There are no cookie-cutter adolescent experiences. Some of these things will apply to the tweens and early teens you know and some of them won’t.<br />12<br />
  17. 17. Defining tweendom<br />13<br />Who are they?<br />
  18. 18. What age range encompasses tweendom?<br />14<br />TIME article narrowed tween to 10-12 yo<br />This was a marketing term originally<br />Educators took up the term since it defined more<br />Surveyed YALSA and FACEBOOK and TWITTER<br />Ages ranged from 9 to 14<br />Median response was 10-14<br />Grade equivalency is 4th to 9th<br />
  19. 19. Defining Tweens<br />Tweens is a fluid definition  meaning that different cognitive, emotional, and social developments happen at different rates in different adolescents. Some 10 year olds may have begun physically developing while others may not see these changes until they are 13. (or older/tsl)<br />Anderson, 2007<br />15<br />
  20. 20. What’s going on physically?<br />16<br />
  21. 21. Some Physical Basics<br />Tweens and early teens are being bombarded by hormones and begin to develop reproductively (i.e. breasts, pubic hair, etc.)*<br />Many experience a growth surge. Guys get taller, and girls get rounder.<br />Many experience a hormonal rollercoaster – becoming moody and seemingly different over night.<br />Pruitt, 1999<br />17<br />
  22. 22. What’s going on psychologically?<br />18<br />
  23. 23. A story about Ed Psych classes<br />19<br />Piaget<br />Take one<br />Take two<br />Take three<br />Maslow<br />Kohlberg<br />Havighurst<br />
  24. 24. Some Psychological Basics<br />Their reasoning capabilities rise to new levels of complexity.<br />The adolescent is learning how to handle adult responsibilities.<br />By age 12, he or she will be able to think about possibilities, consider hypotheses, think ahead, consider the thought process, and think beyond conventional limits.<br />Pruitt, 1999<br />20<br />
  25. 25. More Psychological Basics<br />Increased ability to use abstract verbal concepts.<br />Increased ability to engage in abstract thought to engage in issues like politics, religion and morality.<br />During the middle school years, moral development continues to evolve as the adolescent becomes more aware the relationship between the individual and society.<br />Pruitt, 1999<br />21<br />
  26. 26. What’s going on socially?<br />22<br />
  27. 27. Social Development Basics<br />Expected increase in freedom<br />Move away from family toward peers<br />Likely to have best friends of the similar social and ethnic backgrounds.<br />In 7th grade, the above holds true PLUS they want friends with similar attitudes and values.<br />Peer approval and acceptance grows more important.<br />Pruitt, 1999<br />23<br />
  28. 28. Social Development Basics<br />Rely on friends for everything from companionship to understanding.<br />In middle school, the more a child is pressured by peers, the greater the chance he or she will go along or join in.<br />Pruitt, 1999<br />24<br />
  29. 29. How do tweens differ?<br />25<br />Different from children<br />Physically<br />Socially<br />Intellectually<br />Morally<br />Different from teeens<br />Socially<br />Intellectually<br />Morally<br />Developmentally<br />
  30. 30. Besides being welcoming places to these often unlovable library customers without a place (self identified as too mature for the children’s section and system defined as too young for the teen books), having literature that speaks to them is one of the most important things that we do...<br />26<br />
  31. 31. Anderson, S. (2007). Serving young teens and ‘tweens. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.<br />American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. (1999). Your adolescent: Emotional, behavioral, and cognitive development from early adolescence through the teen years. New York: Harper Collins.<br />Zuckerman, D. (2001). When little girls become women: Early onset of puberty in girls. The Ribbon,6(1).<br />27<br />
  32. 32. BS, that’s brainstorming<br />28<br />What is your vision of a perfect space for tweens and young teens? What does it look like? What materials are there? What is your role? Who else is involved? <br />Pretend that money is no object and that you have the freedom to do ANYthing. <br />Over lunch, we want you to talk in your groups about this vision.<br />
  33. 33. So when I began to write a book about tweens and teens and reading….<br />A title<br />Some research<br />A late night inspiration<br />29<br />
  34. 34. Origin of title<br />30<br />
  35. 35. 31<br />
  36. 36. The research?<br />Vickey Giles<br />Karen Sue Gibson<br />Replicated study from 20 years earlier<br />The questions?<br />32<br />
  37. 37. What could someone do to make you WANTto read BEFORE/AFTER you read?<br />The converse: what could someone do to make you HATE to read BEFORE/AFTER you read?<br />33<br />
  38. 38. What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read?K-12<br />Being allowed to choose any book you want to read<br />34<br />
  39. 39. Quick Note<br />35<br />Nomads of the library<br />Providing more narrowed focus<br />Good book box/truck<br />Displays<br />Helping create more independence<br />If you liked lists<br />Shelf talkers and shelf markers<br />Staff suggests<br />
  40. 40. Reading Ladders<br />36<br />
  41. 41. Step Stools<br />37<br />
  42. 42. And then, what?<br />38<br />
  43. 43. Next steps?<br />39<br />Newbery Books<br />Audiobooks<br />Other variations of traditional literature<br />???<br />
  44. 44. nonfiction<br />40<br />Or different directions…<br />
  45. 45. Walker, 2008<br />41<br />
  46. 46. Series nonfiction<br />42<br />
  47. 47. Topics near and dear to tweens<br />43<br />
  48. 48. 44<br />
  49. 49. Picture book biographies<br />45<br />
  50. 50. Center for the Study of Cartoons<br />46<br />
  51. 51. What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read?K-5<br />Reading in a comfortable place like on the floor, in a bean bag chair, or in a rocking chair<br />47<br />
  52. 52. Spaces and places<br />48<br />Remember to include this aspect in your lunch time discussion about your vision of the perfect space for tweens and young teens. <br />
  53. 53. FSG<br />49<br />
  54. 54. CincoPuntos<br />50<br />
  55. 55. Wendy Lamb<br />51<br />
  56. 56. What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read?K-5<br />Being allowed to buy your own book through a book fair<br />OWNERSHIP!<br />52<br />
  57. 57. Ownership means re-reading<br />53<br />
  58. 58. Scholastic (AUDIO)<br />54<br />
  59. 59. Series is a special ownership<br />55<br />
  60. 60. What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read?K-5<br />Reading books for a contest<br />56<br />
  61. 61. Reading as Social Justice<br />57<br />Banned Books Week<br />MS Read-a-thon<br />Collecting books for donations<br />Other charity drives<br />
  62. 62. Social justice displays<br />58<br />
  63. 63. Civil Rights<br />59<br />
  64. 64. What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read?K-12<br />Having a classroom library<br />60<br />
  65. 65. For public librarians, this means…<br />61<br />Offering workshops for teachers<br />Creating booklists for schools, teachers, and parents<br />Checking out books for temporary classroom libraries<br />
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  71. 71. What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read?K-12<br />Having someone read a book or chapter a day<br />67<br />
  72. 72. Reading Aloud<br />68<br />Research<br />Versus<br />Practice<br />
  73. 73. Silly stuff<br />69<br />
  74. 74. 70<br />
  75. 75. 71<br />
  76. 76. 72<br />
  77. 77. What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read?K-12<br />Having the teacher take you to the library<br />73<br />
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  80. 80. What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read?6-12<br />Author Visits<br />76<br />
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  83. 83. What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read?<br />6-12<br />Seeing the movie or television production of a book.<br />79<br />
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  86. 86. 82<br />
  87. 87. What could someone do to make you want to read BEFORE you read?6-12<br />Being allowed to read books with lots of pictures in them.<br />83<br />
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  90. 90. 86<br />
  91. 91. 87<br />
  92. 92. 88<br />
  93. 93. Graphic-ish Novels<br />89<br />
  94. 94. So, some quick program ideas:<br />90<br />Displays<br />Movie night<br />Author visits<br />Always tied to books<br />
  95. 95. Candy Sushi<br />91<br />Manga<br />James Patterson’s Maximum Ride<br />Asian American authors<br />Laurence Yep, LenseyNamioka, An Na<br />Craft and how to books<br />Howtoons<br />
  96. 96. The late night inspiration<br />T-A-R-G-E-T<br />92<br />
  97. 97. T ARGET<br />93<br />
  98. 98. T is for TRUST<br />94<br />
  99. 99. 95<br />
  100. 100. 96<br />
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  102. 102. 98<br />
  103. 103. A is for ACCESS<br />99<br />
  104. 104. 100<br />
  105. 105. 101<br />
  106. 106. 102<br />
  107. 107. 103<br />
  108. 108. 104<br />
  109. 109. R is for RESPONSE<br />105<br />
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  113. 113. 109<br />
  114. 114. 110<br />
  115. 115. 111<br />
  116. 116. Lemony Snicket is back<br />
  117. 117. G is for GUIDANCE<br />113<br />
  118. 118. Reading ladders<br />114<br />Begin with where they are<br />Build reading experiences slowly<br />Move readers “up” with assistance<br />Provide bridges between books<br />
  119. 119. for instance…<br />115<br />
  120. 120. Building, moving, growing<br />116<br />Picture book ladder<br />
  121. 121. 117<br />
  122. 122. 118<br />
  123. 123. 119<br />
  124. 124. 120<br />
  125. 125. 121<br />
  126. 126. Or…<br />122<br />Family reading ladder<br />
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  128. 128. 124<br />
  129. 129. 125<br />
  130. 130. 126<br />
  131. 131. 127<br />
  132. 132. E is for ENTHUSIASM<br />128<br />
  133. 133. Better books<br />129<br />Bad covers<br />
  134. 134. 130<br />
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  140. 140. 136<br />
  141. 141. UGLY BOOK ADOPTION<br />137<br />Create new covers<br />Use them<br />Display them<br />Adopt-a-book<br />
  142. 142. T is for TWEEN and TEEN APPEAL<br />138<br />
  143. 143. Authors to trust<br />139<br />Established names<br />
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  146. 146. 142<br />
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  148. 148. 144<br />
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  150. 150. familiar<br />146<br />Stories<br />Settings<br />Themes<br />
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  155. 155. 151<br />
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  159. 159. Developmentally appropriate<br />155<br />Issues<br />
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  172. 172. Purposeful<br />Entertaining<br />informative<br />168<br />Nonfiction<br />
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  182. 182. It, too, is developmental<br />178<br />humor<br />
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  185. 185. 181<br />
  186. 186. 182<br />
  187. 187. 183<br />
  188. 188. 184<br />
  189. 189. 185<br />There are many ways to describe Ms. Underdorf.<br /> <br />She was brilliant and joyous, and she believed-probably correctly-that libraries contain the answers to everything, and that if you can’t find the information you seek in the library, then such information probably does not exist in this or any other parallel universe now or ever to be known.<br /> <br />She was thoughtful and kind and always believed the best of everybody. She was, above all else, a master librarian and knew where to find any book on any subject in the shortest possible time.<br /> <br />And she was wonderfully unhinged…<br /> <br />And so the Amazing Armadillo.<br />
  190. 190. 186<br />
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  192. 192. Defying categorization<br />188<br />A few more<br />
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  199. 199. I Need a Good Book<br />I need a good story,<br />I need a good book.<br />The kind that explodes<br />Off the shelf.<br />I need some good writing,<br />Alive and exciting,<br />To contemplate<br />All by myself.<br />195<br />
  200. 200. I need a good novel,<br />I need a good read,<br />I probably need<br />Two or three,<br />I need a good tale<br />Of love and betrayal<br />Or perhaps<br />An adventure at sea.<br />196<br />
  201. 201. I need a good saga.<br />I need a good yarn.<br />A momentous and mighty<br />Or slight one.<br />But with thousands<br />And thousands<br />And thousands of books,<br />I need someone<br />To tell me<br />The right one.<br /> <br />John Lithgow<br />197<br />
  202. 202. Reader's Bill of Rights<br />By The Readers at Book Chat Central<br />There are many versions of the list below. This one comes from Book Chat Central. Use what you like, adapt as you need. Enjoy. <br />198<br />
  203. 203. You have the right to read in exotic settings. You have the right to move your lips when you read You have the right to read anything you want. <br />You have the right never to apologize for your reading tastes. <br />You have the right to read anywhere you want—in the bathtub, in the car (preferably at stop lights if you're driving), in the grocery store, under the porch, or while walking the dog. <br />You have the right to read in bed. Under the covers. With a flashlight. <br />199<br />
  204. 204. . You have the right to laugh or gasp out loud and choose whether or not to explain. <br />You have the right to read the good parts out loud to your nearest and dearest, and when you're not near your book bunch, to strangers if desperate. <br />You have the right to read and eat at the same time. <br />You have the right to read as many books as you want at the same time. <br />200<br />
  205. 205. More importantly, you have the right to ignore all critics. <br />You have the right to read the book spine of the person sitting next to you, even on a plane. And if you can't make it out, you have the right to ASK. <br />You have the right to stop reading a book whenever you decide it's not worth the effort, or that you simply don't like it. <br />You have the right to refuse to read any book anyone else picks out for you. Even if it's a birthday present. <br />201<br />
  206. 206. You have the right to read the last chapter first. <br />You have the right to read the last chapter first and then put the book back on the shelf. <br />You have the right to refuse to read any book where you don't like the picture of the author. <br />You have the right to ignore all of these rules and do whatever you please as long as it's civil...heehee. <br />New Rule: when you find that you're dawdling on your way back to a book, ditch it.<br />202<br />
  207. 207. Finally…<br />203<br />You have the right to read a book and not take a test or create a diorama or write a report or do ANYthing<br />
  208. 208. 204<br />

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