Heart of a reader tctela 14

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Heart of a reader tctela 14

  1. 1. The HEART of a Reader Teri S. Lesesne @professornana www.slideshare.net/professornana
  2. 2. Developing a Reader’s Mind I ended my speech at the ALAN workshop (#alan12) with a revised reader bill of rights. It is based on the wonderful book, Better than Life by Daniel Pennac. Here it is: • 1. Right to READ YAL AT ANY AGE • 2. Right to READ EXTENSIVELY INSTEAD OF INTENSIVELY • 3. Right to CREATE NEW CANON • 4. Right to READ WITH YOUR EARS • 5. Right to READ TRANSMEDIALLY • 6. Right to READ FREELY • 7. Right to READ WITHOUT DOING ANYTHING • 8. Right to READ BELOW YOUR LEXILE • 9. Right to READ BEYOND YOUR ATOS SCORE • 10. Right to REDEFINE READING
  3. 3. DEVELOPING THE HEART OF A Reader TAKES SOME CARE • COMMUNITY • ACCESS • RESPONSE • ENGAGEMENT
  4. 4. Community • Different communities for different reasons • Some are temporary; some are permanent • Overlap
  5. 5. Community
  6. 6. Your Reading Community Donalyn talks about EPICENTER readers in Reading in the Wild. Who influences your reading? 1. 2. 3.
  7. 7. Building Community A community should have a common purpose or goal or belief or shared vision. So, what should be the components of a reading community? What vision do we share about books and reading? How can we build a reading community?
  8. 8. Sharing Books (read alouds) • Pick • Prepare/Preview • Project • Perform
  9. 9. Pick (a pair?)
  10. 10. Preview/Prepare
  11. 11. Project/Perform
  12. 12. Press Play
  13. 13. Using Ladders to Create Communities • Not ONE book • Tie books thematically • • • • • • Genre Form Format Author Theme Character Study
  14. 14. Genre
  15. 15. Genre
  16. 16. Form and Format
  17. 17. Form and Format
  18. 18. Author Study
  19. 19. Author Study
  20. 20. Theme
  21. 21. Theme
  22. 22. Character Study
  23. 23. Character Study
  24. 24. ACCESS • Physical access • Text access • Story access
  25. 25. Text Access • Not Lexiles • Not levels • Developmental aspects
  26. 26. th 5 grade Rank Boys Girls Both Level 1 WIMPY WIMPY WIMPY 5.2 2 WIMPY WIMPY WIMPY 3 WIMPY WIMPY WIMPY 4 HA TCHET 5.9 NUMBER STARS NUMBER STARS 5 NUMBER STARS TWILIGHT 5.7 HATCHET 28 4.5
  27. 27. TH 6 GRADE RANK BOYS GIRLS BOTH 1 WIMPY TWILIGHT WIMPY 2 WIMPY NEW MOON WIMPY 3 WIMPY ECLIPSE TWILIGHT 4 HATCHET WIMPY WIMPY 5 NUMBER STARS BREAKING DAWN HATCHET 29 LEVEL
  28. 28. TH 7 GRADE RANK BOYS GIRLS BOTH 1 OUTSIDERS TWILIGHT TWILIGHT 2 WIMPY NEW MOON NEW MOON 3 WIMPY ELCIPSE ECLIPSE 4 GIVER BREAKING DAWN BREAKING DAWN 5 TWILIGHT OUTSIDERS OUTSIDERS 30 LEVEL
  29. 29. TH 8 GRADE RANK BOYS GIRLS BOTH 1 OUTSIDERS TWILIGHT TWILIGHT 2 GIVER NEW MOON NEW MOON 3 TWILIGHT ECLIPSE ECLIPSE 4 NEW MOON BREAKING DAWN BREAKING DAWN 5 WIMPY OUTSIDERS OUTSIDERS 31 LEVEL
  30. 30. Higher or Lower? –
  31. 31. Higher or Lower? –
  32. 32. Higher or Lower? –
  33. 33. Higher or Lower –
  34. 34. One More Time –
  35. 35. Access Points?
  36. 36. Story Access
  37. 37. Story Access
  38. 38. Story Access
  39. 39. Response – Personal/e motive interpretive evaluative critical
  40. 40. Levels of Response –  Personal/Emotive What is your gut reaction to the text?  Interpretive If you were one of the characters, what would you have done differently?  Critical How does the author demonstrate her or his craft?  Evaluative What makes this a “good” or “bad” book?
  41. 41. Personal/Emotive
  42. 42. Interpretive
  43. 43. Critical
  44. 44. Evaluative
  45. 45. Engagement
  46. 46. Engagement
  47. 47. Engagement
  48. 48. Engagement
  49. 49. Developing a Reader’s Heart • 1. Someone with the heart of a reader is already a reader, enjoys reading, and turns to reading on a regular basis as an activity they prefer. 2. Someone with the heart of a reader does not need extrinsic motivation. No points, pizza, or other incentives are needed. 3. Someone with the heart of a reader tends to have friends who have reader hearts, too. They enjoy taking about books they have read, comparing notes. 4. Someone with the heart of a reader reads up and down and sideways. Sometimes they turn to books that are easy reads, and occasionally they challenge themselves, too. While they have comfort books, they read widely as well. 5. Someone with the heart of a reader recognizes that books entertain, inform, provoke, and touch them deep in those hearts. They know books can elicit laughter, tears, rage, and the full range of emotions.
  50. 50. Heart Reading
  51. 51. Developing a Reader’s Heart • 1. Someone with the heart of a reader is already a reader, enjoys reading, and turns to reading on a regular basis as an activity they prefer. 2. Someone with the heart of a reader does not need extrinsic motivation. No points, pizza, or other incentives are needed. 3. Someone with the heart of a reader tends to have friends who have reader hearts, too. They enjoy taking about books they have read, comparing notes. 4. Someone with the heart of a reader reads up and down and sideways. Sometimes they turn to books that are easy reads, and occasionally they challenge themselves, too. While they have comfort books, they read widely as well. 5. Someone with the heart of a reader recognizes that books entertain, inform, provoke, and touch them deep in those hearts. They know books can elicit laughter, tears, rage, and the full range of emotions.
  52. 52. Reading as Reward
  53. 53. Developing a Reader’s Heart • 1. Someone with the heart of a reader is already a reader, enjoys reading, and turns to reading on a regular basis as an activity they prefer. 2. Someone with the heart of a reader does not need extrinsic motivation. No points, pizza, or other incentives are needed. 3. Someone with the heart of a reader tends to have friends who have reader hearts, too. They enjoy taking about books they have read, comparing notes. 4. Someone with the heart of a reader reads up and down and sideways. Sometimes they turn to books that are easy reads, and occasionally they challenge themselves, too. While they have comfort books, they read widely as well. 5. Someone with the heart of a reader recognizes that books entertain, inform, provoke, and touch them deep in those hearts. They know books can elicit laughter, tears, rage, and the full range of emotions.
  54. 54. Friends’ Recommendations
  55. 55. Developing a Reader’s Heart • 1. Someone with the heart of a reader is already a reader, enjoys reading, and turns to reading on a regular basis as an activity they prefer. 2. Someone with the heart of a reader does not need extrinsic motivation. No points, pizza, or other incentives are needed. 3. Someone with the heart of a reader tends to have friends who have reader hearts, too. They enjoy taking about books they have read, comparing notes. 4. Someone with the heart of a reader reads up and down and sideways. Sometimes they turn to books that are easy reads, and occasionally they challenge themselves, too. While they have comfort books, they read widely as well. 5. Someone with the heart of a reader recognizes that books entertain, inform, provoke, and touch them deep in those hearts. They know books can elicit laughter, tears, rage, and the full range of emotions.
  56. 56. Up, Down, Sideways
  57. 57. Developing a Reader’s Heart • 1. Someone with the heart of a reader is already a reader, enjoys reading, and turns to reading on a regular basis as an activity they prefer. 2. Someone with the heart of a reader does not need extrinsic motivation. No points, pizza, or other incentives are needed. 3. Someone with the heart of a reader tends to have friends who have reader hearts, too. They enjoy taking about books they have read, comparing notes. 4. Someone with the heart of a reader reads up and down and sideways. Sometimes they turn to books that are easy reads, and occasionally they challenge themselves, too. While they have comfort books, they read widely as well. 5. Someone with the heart of a reader recognizes that books entertain, inform, provoke, and touch them deep in those hearts. They know books can elicit laughter, tears, rage, and the full range of emotions.
  58. 58. Entertain
  59. 59. Inform
  60. 60. Provoke
  61. 61. Touch
  62. 62. Does it all
  63. 63. And a final rec
  64. 64. Why all the talk about Engagement? Coming in March 2015
  65. 65. DONALYN MILLER TERI LESESNE WILL YOU BE MINE? HEINEMANN THE ENGAGEMENT BOOK MARCH 2015

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