Chapter 3
2© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
 Theatre productions typically begin withthe script, or text Provides a plan for a production3© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Com...
 Selecting the specificsubject of the play The subject matterfor drama is alwayshuman beings Determine whataspect of hu...
 Determining focus Decide who andwhat to focus on How to interpret thecharacters and events5© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Comp...
 Establishing purpose Purpose may be:▪ Casual or unconscious, or▪ Conscious and deliberate6© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Compan...
 Establishing purpose continued Different purposes:▪ To entertain▪ To probe the human condition▪ To provide an escape▪ T...
 Developing dramatic structure Every work of art has some type of structure The structure of a play is analogous to tha...
 Essentials of Dramatic Structure The story must be turned into a plot The plot involves action The plot includes conf...
 Sequence in Dramatic Structure Begin with the opening scene▪ Starts the action and sets the tone and style▪ Tells wheth...
 Climactic Plot Construction First used in 5th century B.C.E. Greece Also called intensive The Plot Begins Late in the...
 Episodic Plot Construction▪ Emerged during the Renaissance in England andin Spain People, Places, and Events Proliferat...
 Other Forms of Dramatic Structure Ritual as Structure Patterns as Structure Cyclical Structure Serial Structure13© 2...
 Other Forms of Dramatic Structure continued Avant-Garde and Experimental Structures▪ Interest in ritual and ceremony▪ E...
 Types of Dramatic Characters Extraordinary Characters▪ Heroes and heroines▪ Larger than life▪ Historically, have been k...
16© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
 Types of Dramatic Characters continued Representative or Quintessential Characters▪ Three-dimensional, highly individua...
 Types of Dramatic Characters continued Characters with a Dominant Trait▪ One aspect of this character dominates, making...
 Types of Dramatic Characters continued Narrator or Chorus▪ Generally, a narrator speaks directly to the audience▪ Comme...
 Juxtaposition of Characters Protagonist: leading character, chief oroutstanding figure in the action Antagonist: chara...
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Chapter three creating the dramatic script power point

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Chapter three creating the dramatic script power point

  1. 1. Chapter 3
  2. 2. 2© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  3. 3.  Theatre productions typically begin withthe script, or text Provides a plan for a production3© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  4. 4.  Selecting the specificsubject of the play The subject matterfor drama is alwayshuman beings Determine whataspect of humanexistenceto write about4© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  5. 5.  Determining focus Decide who andwhat to focus on How to interpret thecharacters and events5© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  6. 6.  Establishing purpose Purpose may be:▪ Casual or unconscious, or▪ Conscious and deliberate6© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  7. 7.  Establishing purpose continued Different purposes:▪ To entertain▪ To probe the human condition▪ To provide an escape▪ To impart information7© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  8. 8.  Developing dramatic structure Every work of art has some type of structure The structure of a play is analogous to that ofa building Creating dramatic characters Establishing point of view© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 8
  9. 9.  Essentials of Dramatic Structure The story must be turned into a plot The plot involves action The plot includes conflict There are strongly opposed forces A reasonable balance is struck between theopposed forces9© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  10. 10.  Sequence in Dramatic Structure Begin with the opening scene▪ Starts the action and sets the tone and style▪ Tells whether we are going to see a serious or acomic play and whether the play will deal with affairsof everyday life or with fantasy Obstacles and complications blocka character’s path Crises and Climaxes© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 10
  11. 11.  Climactic Plot Construction First used in 5th century B.C.E. Greece Also called intensive The Plot Begins Late in the Story Scenes, Locales, and Characters AreRestricted Construction Is Tight11© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  12. 12.  Episodic Plot Construction▪ Emerged during the Renaissance in England andin Spain People, Places, and Events Proliferate There May Be a Parallel Plot or a Subplot Contrast and Juxtaposition Are Used The Overall Effect Is Cumulative Combinations of Climactic and Episodic12© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  13. 13.  Other Forms of Dramatic Structure Ritual as Structure Patterns as Structure Cyclical Structure Serial Structure13© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  14. 14.  Other Forms of Dramatic Structure continued Avant-Garde and Experimental Structures▪ Interest in ritual and ceremony▪ Emphasis on nonverbal theatre▪ Reliance on improvisation▪ Stress on the physical environment of theatre▪ Stress on each audience member’s developinghis or her own interpretation of the work beingpresented Segments and Tableaux as Structure14© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  15. 15.  Types of Dramatic Characters Extraordinary Characters▪ Heroes and heroines▪ Larger than life▪ Historically, have been kings, queens, generals,members of nobility▪ Present some form of extreme of human behavior15© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  16. 16. 16© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  17. 17.  Types of Dramatic Characters continued Representative or Quintessential Characters▪ Three-dimensional, highly individual, ordinary▪ Embody the characteristics of an entire group Stock Characters▪ Symbolize a particular type of person to theexclusion of virtually everyone else▪ Appear particularly in comedy and melodrama17© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  18. 18.  Types of Dramatic Characters continued Characters with a Dominant Trait▪ One aspect of this character dominates, making foran unbalanced, and often comic, personality Minor Characters▪ Play a small part in overall action▪ Appear briefly and serve to further the story or tosupport more important characters18© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  19. 19.  Types of Dramatic Characters continued Narrator or Chorus▪ Generally, a narrator speaks directly to the audience▪ Comments on the action▪ Greek drama used a chorus that commented, insong and dance, on the action Nonhuman Characters▪ Often animals that are supposed to draw parallelswith the human experience19© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  20. 20.  Juxtaposition of Characters Protagonist: leading character, chief oroutstanding figure in the action Antagonist: character who opposes theprotagonist Foils or counterparts to the main characters20© 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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