Ethical Public Speaking Ethics is the responsibility we have toward the audience and ourselves.  O’Hair, Stewart, Rubentei...
Today’s Agenda <ul><li>Learn how to take responsibility for your words!   </li></ul><ul><li>Explain how to avoid plagiaris...
Ethics and Public Speaking <ul><li>Ethics is derived from the Greek word  ethos   which means character. </li></ul><ul><li...
Take Responsibility For Your Words! <ul><li>Earn your listener’s trust </li></ul><ul><li>Respect your listener’s value  </...
1. Earn your listener’s trust <ul><li>Have competence </li></ul><ul><li>Have good moral character </li></ul><ul><li>Demons...
2. Respect your listener’s value <ul><li>Values can conflict or clash </li></ul><ul><li>Conflicting values lies at the hea...
3. Bring your own values into focus Your Values Audience Values Overlapping Values O’Hair, Stewart, Rubentein (2009)
<ul><li>Are there any laws that govern whether or not it is acceptable to lie? </li></ul><ul><li>What message does society...
Is this an acceptable lie to you?
Free Speech <ul><li>Protected by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution </li></ul><ul><li>Limitations: speech that p...
Virtual Slander <ul><li>Online discussion groups have created new and </li></ul><ul><li>anonymous ways to defame another p...
Ground Rules for Ethical Speaking <ul><li>Maintain the  dignity  of your audience members. </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain your...
PLAIGERISM
Discussion <ul><li>If a student gives a speech in which he/she did research and presents information based on that researc...
Types of Plagiarism <ul><li>Global, or  wholesale plagiarism:  take entire sections from the source and insert into your s...
Copyright and Fair Use <ul><li>Copyright laws protect  intellectual property , the creator’s right to own his/her own crea...
Bibliography <ul><li>O’ Hair, Dan, Stewart, Rob, Rubenstein, Hannah,  A Speaker’s Guidebook , Bedford St. Martin (2009) </...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Chp 5 ethical public speaking

22,287 views

Published on

O’ Hair, Dan, Stewart, Rob, Rubenstein, Hannah, A Speaker’s Guidebook, Bedford St. Martin (2009)

  • Be the first to comment

Chp 5 ethical public speaking

  1. 1. Ethical Public Speaking Ethics is the responsibility we have toward the audience and ourselves. O’Hair, Stewart, Rubentein (2009) Chapter Five                                   
  2. 2. Today’s Agenda <ul><li>Learn how to take responsibility for your words! </li></ul><ul><li>Explain how to avoid plagiarism. </li></ul><ul><li>Share Your Community Moments </li></ul>
  3. 3. Ethics and Public Speaking <ul><li>Ethics is derived from the Greek word ethos which means character. </li></ul><ul><li>Little has changed since Aristotle’s day; audience members still expect speakers to be honest, respectful, knowledgeable, and to have organized delivery of reasonable thoughts. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Take Responsibility For Your Words! <ul><li>Earn your listener’s trust </li></ul><ul><li>Respect your listener’s value </li></ul><ul><li>Bring your own value’s into focus </li></ul>
  5. 5. 1. Earn your listener’s trust <ul><li>Have competence </li></ul><ul><li>Have good moral character </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate goodwill </li></ul><ul><li>Show credibility </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Solid grasp of subject </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sound reasoning skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Honest and straightforward </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Genuinely interested in the welfare of listener’s </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. 2. Respect your listener’s value <ul><li>Values can conflict or clash </li></ul><ul><li>Conflicting values lies at the heart of many controversies </li></ul><ul><li>Anticipate the audience will hold a range of values. Be sensitive! </li></ul>
  7. 7. 3. Bring your own values into focus Your Values Audience Values Overlapping Values O’Hair, Stewart, Rubentein (2009)
  8. 8. <ul><li>Are there any laws that govern whether or not it is acceptable to lie? </li></ul><ul><li>What message does society send about lying? </li></ul><ul><li>What did your cultural upbringing (family training) teach you about lying? </li></ul><ul><li>O’Hair, Stewart, Rubentein (2009) </li></ul>To tell a lie: An Ethical Dilemma
  9. 9. Is this an acceptable lie to you?
  10. 10. Free Speech <ul><li>Protected by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution </li></ul><ul><li>Limitations: speech that provokes the audience to violence, that defames another person’s character, or that invades another person’s privacy. </li></ul><ul><li>Some legally protected speech is still unethical. </li></ul><ul><li>O’Hair, Stewart, Rubentein (2009) </li></ul>
  11. 11. Virtual Slander <ul><li>Online discussion groups have created new and </li></ul><ul><li>anonymous ways to defame another person’s character. </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook </li></ul><ul><li>MySpace </li></ul><ul><li>Ratemyprofessor.com </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>You-tube video clips </li></ul><ul><li>Personal websites </li></ul>
  12. 12. Ground Rules for Ethical Speaking <ul><li>Maintain the dignity of your audience members. </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain your integrity by not compromising the truth. </li></ul><ul><li>Be trustworthy by not manipulating data, hiding relevant information, or forgetting to reveal sources. </li></ul><ul><li>Respect the audience by refraining from verbally attacking them. Avoid ethnocentric remarks, making stereotypes , and using hate speech . </li></ul><ul><li>O’Hair, et al (2009) </li></ul>
  13. 13. PLAIGERISM
  14. 14. Discussion <ul><li>If a student gives a speech in which he/she did research and presents information based on that research, should the student cite the sources of such information in the speech? </li></ul><ul><li>If the student does not cite the sources of the information presented in the speech, what grade does the student deserve? </li></ul>
  15. 15. Types of Plagiarism <ul><li>Global, or wholesale plagiarism: take entire sections from the source and insert into your speech. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Example: Each of your three main ideas is a section from a source where every line comes from the same source. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Patchwrite plagiarism (also called Patchwork ): change a few words here and there to make the material appear like your own. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Example: Creating your own outline of a single article and presenting it. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Copyright and Fair Use <ul><li>Copyright laws protect intellectual property , the creator’s right to own his/her own creative works. </li></ul><ul><li>In the classroom, a teacher or student speaker has limited rights to use someone else’s work as long as credit is given to the creator. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Bibliography <ul><li>O’ Hair, Dan, Stewart, Rob, Rubenstein, Hannah, A Speaker’s Guidebook , Bedford St. Martin (2009) </li></ul>

×