Chapter 24 the persuasive speech

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Bibliography: O’ Hair, Dan, Stewart, Rob, Rubenstein, Hannah, A Speaker’s Guidebook, Bedford St. Martin (2009)

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Chapter 24 the persuasive speech

  1. 1. Chapter 24 The Persuasive Speech Professor Tonya Seavers Evans
  2. 2. What is the persuasive speech? <ul><li>Goal is to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Influence an audience’s beliefs or understanding about something. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Influence an audience’s behavior. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reinforce audience members’ existing attitudes, beliefs, or behavior so they will continue to possess or practice them. </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Classical Persuasive Appeals <ul><li>Aristotle explained that persuasion could be brought about by the speaker’s use of three types of persuasive appeals, or forms of rhetorical proofs. </li></ul><ul><li>The first is the message in the speech called logos. </li></ul><ul><li>The second, the nature of the audience’s feelings, called pathos. </li></ul><ul><li>The qualifications and personality of the speaker, called ethos. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Logos: Proof by Reason <ul><li>Appeals directed at the audience’s reasoning on the topic </li></ul><ul><li>To reason is to draw conclusions based on evidence. </li></ul><ul><li>Described two forms of reasoning of speeches: syllogism and enthymeme </li></ul>
  5. 5. Proof by Reason <ul><li>Syllogism – A three part argument consisting of a general case or major premise, and a specific case or minor premise </li></ul><ul><li>The conclusion derived from the first two steps </li></ul><ul><li>Based on deductive reasoning or reasoning from a general condition to a specific instance </li></ul><ul><li>Beware of hasty overgeneralizations </li></ul>
  6. 6. Proof by reason <ul><li>Enthymeme – A syllogism is presented as a probability rather than as a an absolute, and it states either a general case or a specific case but not both. </li></ul><ul><li>Be sure to read the examples on page 379 for specifics. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Pathos: Proof by Emotion <ul><li>Creating a certain disposition in the audience </li></ul><ul><li>You can evoke these emotions in a speech by using vivid descriptions and emotionally charged words </li></ul><ul><li>Use emotion to get the audience’s attention and stimulates a desire to act on the emotion </li></ul><ul><li>Reason is then presented as justification for the action </li></ul>
  8. 8. Ethos: Proof through Speaker’s Character <ul><li>Emphasizes the nature of the speaker’s character and personality </li></ul><ul><li>Elements of persuasive appeal based on ethos: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Good sense. Knowledge of and experience with the subject matter. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Moral character. Reflected in the speaker’s straightforward and honest presentation of the message. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Goodwill toward the audience. Demonstrate an interest in and concern for the welfare of the audience. </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Bibliography O’ Hair, Dan, Stewart, Rob, Rubenstein, Hannah, A Speaker’s Guidebook, Bedford St. Martin (2009)

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