Chap 23 the informative speech

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O’ Hair, Dan, Stewart, Rob, Rubenstein, Hannah, A Speaker’s Guidebook, Bedford St. Martin (2009)

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Chap 23 the informative speech

  1. 1. 23 The Informative Speech
  2. 2. Objectives of Informative Speaking <ul><li>To communicate knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>To raise audience awareness about a topic. </li></ul><ul><li>To provide additional information to audience’s current knowledge base. </li></ul><ul><li>To shape perceptions. </li></ul><ul><li>To demonstrate how something works. </li></ul><ul><li>To describe an event. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Types of Informational Speeches <ul><li>About objects or phenomena </li></ul><ul><li>About people </li></ul><ul><li>About events </li></ul><ul><li>About processes </li></ul><ul><li>About issues </li></ul><ul><li>About complex concepts </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Table 23.1 </li></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Defining Information <ul><li>Etymology: By illustrating the root or historical meanings of the term </li></ul><ul><li>Operational: By explaining what it does </li></ul><ul><li>Negation: By describing what it is not </li></ul><ul><li>Example: By providing concrete examples of it </li></ul><ul><li>Synonym: By comparing it with something it is like </li></ul>
  5. 5. Speeches of Demonstration <ul><li>“How-to” speech, be prepared to use objects, models, or diagrams to demonstrate the process. </li></ul><ul><li>Choose topics that are unusual – items that you’ve never seen demonstrated before which you know how to do. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Speeches of Explanation <ul><li>Provide detailed descriptions of persons, places, or things. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide reasons or causes for the concept. </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate relationships between two things. </li></ul><ul><li>Offer interpretation and analysis about the item. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Strategies for Reducing Confusion <ul><li>Use analogies to build on prior knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate underlying causes </li></ul><ul><li>Check audience for understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Appeal to different learning styles </li></ul>
  8. 8. Organizing the Informative Speech <ul><li>Choose the speech pattern that best fits the type of informative speech you are giving. </li></ul><ul><li>Organize your main points appropriately to the speech pattern. </li></ul><ul><li>Match your audio/visual aids to the speech pattern. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Matching Speech Type & Pattern <ul><li>OBJECTS – spatial or topical </li></ul><ul><li>PEOPLE – topical, narrative, or chronological </li></ul><ul><li>EVENTS – topical, chronological, causal, or narrative </li></ul><ul><li>PROCESSES – chronological, spatial, or causal </li></ul><ul><li>CONCEPTS – topical, causal, or circular </li></ul><ul><li>ISSUES – topical, chronological, causal, circular </li></ul>
  10. 10. Bibliography <ul><li>O’ Hair, Dan, Stewart, Rob, Rubenstein, Hannah, A Speaker’s Guidebook , Bedford St. Martin (2009) </li></ul>

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