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07WorldDataSheet_presentation.ppth

  1. 1. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Malnutrition Is Still a Major Contributor to Child Deaths Presentation by Carl Haub, Richard Skolnik, and Linda Jacobsen of the Population Reference Bureau, Aug. 16, 2007 2007 World Population Data Sheet
  2. 2. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Global Population Growth Is Driven by Developing Countries. Source: United Nations Population Division, World Population Prospects: The 2006 Revision. World Population (in Billions): 1950-2050
  3. 3. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Developed Countries Have Fewer Young People, but a Higher Share of Elderly. Source: United Nations Population Division, World Population Prospects: The 2006 Revision. Population by Age and Sex, More Developed Countries: 2007
  4. 4. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Developing Countries Have More Young People, and a Smaller Share of Elderly. Source: United Nations Population Division, World Population Prospects: The 2006 Revision. Population by Age and Sex, Less Developed Countries: 2007
  5. 5. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU An Important Global Issue Is the “Demographic Divide” – The Vast Gulf in Birth and Death Rates Among Countries. ETHIOPIA GERMANY Total Population 77.1 million 82.3 million Population below Age 15 33.0 million 11.9 million Population Age 65 and Older 2.2 million 15.3 million Annual Births 3.1 million 672,000 Annual Deaths 1.2 million 821,000 Annual Infant Deaths 236,000 2,600 Life Expectancy at Birth 49 years 79 years Percent of Adults Ages 15-49 with HIV/AIDS 1.4% 0.1% Source: Carl Haub, 2007 World Population Data Sheet. Ethiopia and Germany: The Demographic Divide in 2007
  6. 6. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU In Many Developing Countries, Fertility Rates Are Stabilizing After Years of Decline. Source: United Nations Population Division and National Demographic and Health Surveys. Fertility Trends in Sub-Saharan Africa: 1980-2005
  7. 7. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU India’s National Fertility Rate Masks Sharp Differences Among its States. Source: Registrar General of India, Sample Registration System. Total Fertility Rate in India and Selected States: 2005
  8. 8. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU By Comparison, Fertility Levels May Be on the Rebound in Much of Europe. Source: National statistical agencies. Fertility Trends in Europe: 1980-2006
  9. 9. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU HIV Prevalence Varies Greatly Among Countries, and Is Highest in sub-Saharan Africa. Sources: UNAIDS, Demographic and Health Surveys. Percent of Adults Ages 15-49 with HIV, Selected Countries: 2005-2006
  10. 10. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa Have the Highest Shares of Young Children who Are Underweight. Source: Carl Haub, 2007 World Population Data Sheet. Prevalence of Underweight Children Under Age 5, by Country
  11. 11. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Vitamin A and Iron Deficiencies Are Also Prevalent Among Children Under Age 5. Source: Disease Control Priorities Project, “Stunting, Wasting, and Micronutrient Disorders” (2006): Table 28.1. Percent of Children Under Age 5 with Vitamin A and Iron Deficiencies, Selected Regions
  12. 12. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Malnutrition Carries High Human and Economic Costs. Source: The Micronutrient Initiative, Vitamin and Mineral Deficiency: A Global Damage Assessment Report. Estimated Percentage of GDP Lost to All Forms of Vitamin and Mineral Deficiency, Selected Countries
  13. 13. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Some Countries Have Made Progress in Reducing Malnutrition Among Children Under 5. Source: ORC Macro, MEASURE DHS STATcompiler (www.measuredhs.com, accessed August 9, 2007). Percent of Children Under Age 5 Who Are Moderately Underweight, Selected Countries
  14. 14. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Low-Cost Interventions Can Dramatically Reduce the Prevalence of Malnutrition. INTERVENTION COST Conditional Cash Transfers $70.00 - $77.00 Iron Supplements $0.55 - $3.17 Vitamin A Supplements $1.01 - $2.55 Nutrition Education $2.50 Salt Iodization $0.20 - $0.50 Source: World Bank, Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development: A Strategy for Large-Scale Action (2006): Table 1.2. Annual Cost per Person of Nutrition Programs
  15. 15. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Long a Problem in Industrialized Countries, Obesity Is a Problem in the Developing World. Source: Carl Haub, 2007 World Population Data Sheet. Percent of Adults Who Are Obese, Selected Countries: 2005
  16. 16. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU The Share of U.S. Adults and Children who Are Overweight Has Risen Dramatically. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Health, United States, 2006: Table 73. Percent of Adults Ages 20-74 and Children Who Are Overweight or Obese, United States: 1960s to 2000s
  17. 17. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU In the United States, Obesity Rates Are Highest Among Adults in Their Late 50s and Early 60s. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Health, United States, 2006: Table 73. Percent of Men and Women Ages 20 and Older Who Are Obese, United States, by Age: 2001-2004
  18. 18. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Despite Rising Obesity Levels, Some Households in the United States Do Not Always Have Enough to Eat. Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Household Food Security in the United States, 2005 (Economic Research Report No.29): Table 1-A. Percent of Households and Children Who Are Food Insecure, United States: 1998-2005
  19. 19. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Children Are More Likely to Experience Food Insecurity in Some Types of Households. Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Household Food Security in the United States, 2005 (Economic Research Report No.29): Table 6. Prevalence of Food Insecurity by Children’s Household Characteristics, United States: 2005
  20. 20. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Women in the United States Have More Children on Average Than Women in Europe. Source: National statistical agencies. Fertility Trends in Europe and the United States: 1980-2006
  21. 21. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Hispanic Women Have the Highest Fertility Among Major U.S. Racial and Ethnic Groups. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Fertility Trends in the United States, by Race and Ethnicity: 1991 and 2005
  22. 22. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Older People Are a Smaller Share of the Population in the United States Than in Europe and Japan. Source: Carl Haub, 2007 World Population Data Sheet. Population Age 65 and Older, by Country
  23. 23. © 2007 POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU Presentation by Carl Haub, Richard Skolnik, and Linda Jacobsen of the Population Reference Bureau, Aug. 16, 2007 2007 World Population Data Sheet Malnutrition Is Still a Major Contributor to Child Deaths

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