SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 58
Download to read offline
Research Project Report
On
A STUDY ON CONSUMER BUYING BEHAVIOR AND
FACTORS EFFECTING THEIR BUYING BEHAVIOR
Submitted for the partial fulfillment of the Award
Of
Master of Business Administration
DEGREE
(Session :2022- 2023)
SUBMITTED BY
MD IRSHAD
2102720700082
UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF
DR PRAMOD SRIVASTAVA
Department of Master of Business Administration
GNIOT-MBA Institute, Greater Noida
AFFILIATED TO
DR. A.P.J. ABDUL KALAM TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY (FORMERLY
UTTARPRADESH TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY), LUCKNOW
PAGE 1
STUDENT DECLARATION
I “MD IRSHAD” hereby declare that the work which is being presented in this
report entitled “A STUDY ON CONSUMER BUYING BEHAVIOR AND
FACTORS EFFECTING THEIR BUYING BEHAVIOR” is an authentic
record of my own work carried out underthe supervision of Dr PRAMOD
SRIVASTAVA.
The matter embodied in this report has not been submitted by me for the award
of any otherdegree/ Diploma/ Certificate.
Department of MBA Name of Student: - MD IRSHAD
Date:-26-05-23
.
PAGE 2
CERTIFICATE
This is to certify that the work which is being presented in this report entitled “A
STUDY ON CONSUMER BUYING BEHAVIOR AND FACTORS
EFFECTING THEIR BUYING BEHAVIOR” is an authentic record of the
student carried out under my supervision. The statements made by the candidate
are correct to the best of my knowledge.
Dr.Raj Kamal Upadhyaya Name of Supervisor: Pramod Sir
Head, Department of MBA Designation: PROFESSOR
Date:-26-05-23
(Seal of the Department/ College)
PAGE 3
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
It is my pleasure to be indebted to various people, who directly or indirectly
contributed in the development of this work and who influenced my thinking,
behavior, and acts during the course of study.
I am thankful to Dr PRAMOD SRIVASTAVA SIR for his support, cooperation,
and motivation provided to me during the training for constant inspiration, presence
and blessings.
I also extend my sincere appreciation to Dr PRAMOD SRIVASTAVA SIR. who
provided his valuable suggestions and precious time inaccomplishing my project
report.
Lastly, I would like to thank the almighty, parents, Director and HOD of the
institute for their moral support and my friends with whom I shared my day- to-
day experience and received lots of suggestions that improved my quality of work.
.
MD IRSHAD
PAGE 4
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I wish to express my sincere gratitude towards BIG BAZAAR for giving me an
opportunity to be a part of their esteemed organization for a period of 30 days for
my Summer Internship Project under their guidance. Completing this task is never
a one-man effort. It is always a result of inseparable contribution of a number of
individuals in direct and indirect manner.
I would like to express my sincere thanks to MISS SHIKHA SHARMA, HR
Executive, Big Bazaar, Bokaro for sparing her valuable time, knowledge and
technical know-how, including keen interest and guiding me at every stage of this
project.
Last but not the least, I thank all the employees at Big Bazaar for helping me
throughout my project.
Thank you.
PRAN KUMAR MAHATO
PAGE 5
TABLE OF CONTENTS
S. NO. TOPIC PAGE
NO.
1 INTRODUCTION
 Objectives
 Scopes
 Importance
05
2 COMPANY PROFILE 09
3 LITERATURE REVIEW 13
4 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 26
5 ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION 30
6 RECOMMENDATIONS 47
7 CONCLUSION 49
8 LIMITATIONS 51
9 REFERENCES 53
10 ANNEXURE 55
PAGE 6
PAGE 7
INTRODUCTION
As customer’s tastes and preferences are changing, the market scenario is also
changing from time to time. Today’s market scenario is very different from that
of the market scenario before 1990. There have been many factors responsible for
the changing market scenario. It is the changing tastes and preference of customer
which has bought in a change in the market. Income level of the people has
changed; life styles and social class of people have completely changed now than
that of old days. There has been a shift in the market demand in today’s world.
Technology is one of the major factors which is responsible for this paradigm
shift in the market. New generation people are no more dependent on haat market
and far off departmental stores. Today we can see a new era in market with the
opening up of many departmental stores, hyper market, shopper’s stop, malls,
branded retail outlets and specialty stores. In today’s world shopping is not any
more tiresome work rather it’s a pleasant outing phenomenon now.
My study is based on a survey done on customers of a hypermarket named Big
Bazaar. Big Bazaar is a new type of market which came into existence in India
since 1994. It is a type of market where various kinds of products are available
under one roof. My study is on determining the customer’s buying behavior and
factors influencing their buying decision at Big Bazaar. My study will find out
the areas where Big Bazaar lacks behind the customer’s expectations and
determine what should be done to stands in the current market.
This field survey will help in knowing the present customers tastes and
preferences. It will help me in estimating the customer’s future needs, wants,
demands and serving them better.
*****
PAGE 8
OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
1. To find out the buying behavior of the customers coming to Big Bazaar, Bokaro.
2. To find out the customers response towards various attributes of Big Bazaar.
3. To study the satisfaction level of customers in different attributes of Big Bazaar.
*****
SCOPE OF STUDY
The scope of this research is to identify the buying behavior of customers of Big
Bazaar in Bokaro. This research is based on primary data only. Due to time
constraint only limited number of persons contacted. This study only focuses
buying behavior of customers in Bokaro. The study does not say anything about
buying behavior of customer of other places. The scope of research is limited for
Bokaro. It provides help to further the research for organized retail sector in
Bokaro. It aim to understand the skill of the company in the area like
technological advancement and competition in management.
*****
PAGE 9
IMPORTANCE OF STUDY
The study shows customers buying pattern with Big Bazaar in Bokaro. Its provide
guideline for further research in Bokaro for organized retail. Research says about
customer buying behavior towards Big Bazaar in Bokaro. The study rate of
customer satisfaction level with Big Bazaar for Bokaro. The research is also
important to identify Market size, growth and Market Potential of Big Bazaar in
Bokaro. The research shows future Scenario of Big Bazaar in current perspective.
The study shows Opportunities and challenges for Big Bazaar respect of internal
& external environment. Research say about main competitors in the field of
organized retail sectors. The study provide guideline to further extension of Big
Bazaar in Bokaro .The study provide help to know the customers satisfaction with
Big Bazaar stores.
*****
PAGE 10
PAGE 11
COMPANY PROFILE
About the Company:
Mr. Kishore Biyani, CEO, Future India‘s leading retailer that operates multiple
retail formats in both the value and lifestyle segment of the Indian consumer
market. Headquartered in Mumbai, the company operates over 16.33 million
square feet. Of retail space, has over 1000 stores across 85 cities and 60 rural
locations across the country and employs over 35000 people. The company‘s
leading format include Pantaloons, a chain of fashion outlets, Big Bazaar, a
uniquely Indian hypermarket chain, Food Bazaar, a supermarket chain, blends the
look, touch and feel of Indian bazaars with aspects of modern retail like choice,
convenience and quality. Central is a chain of seamless destination malls. Some
of its other formats include Shoe Factory, Brand Factory, Blue Sky, Fashion
Station, Mobile Bazaar and Star Sitara (Beauty clinic). The company also
operates an online portal, Futurebazaar.com. A subsidiary company, Home
Solutions Retail (India) Limited, operates Home Town, a large-format home
solutions store, selling home furniture products and E-Zone focused on catering
to the consumer electronics segment. Future Group understands the soul of Indian
consumers. As one of India‘s retail pioneers with multiple retail formats, we
connect a diverse and passionate community of Indian buyers, sellers and
businesses. The collective impact on business is staggering: Around 220 million
customers walk into our stores each year and choose products and a service
supplied by over 30,000 small, medium and large entrepreneurs and
manufacturers from across India and this number is set to grow.
Group Vision:
Future Group shall deliver Everything, Everywhere, Every time for Every Indian
Consumer in the most profitable manner.
Group Mission:
We share the vision and belief that our customers and stakeholders shall be served
only by creating and executing future scenarios in the consumption space leading
to economic development.
PAGE 12
 We will be the trendsetters in evolving delivery formats, creating retail
realty, making consumption affordable for all customer segments – for
classes and for masses.
 We shall infuse Indian brands with confidence and renewed ambition.
 We shall be efficient, cost- conscious and committed to quality in whatever
we do.
 We shall ensure that our positive attitude, sincerity, humility and united
determination shall be the driving force to make us successful
Group Values:
 Indianness: Confidence in ourselves.
 Leadership: To be a leader, both in thought and business.
 Respect & Humility: To respect every individual and be humble in our
conduct.
 Introspection: Leading to purposeful thinking.
 Openness: To be open and receptive to new ideas, knowledge and
information.
 Valuing and Nurturing Relationships: To build long term
relationships.
 Simplicity & Positivity: Simplicity and positivity in our thought,
business and action.
 Adaptability: To be flexible and adaptable, to meet challenges.
 Flow: To respect and understand the universal laws of nature
KEY GROUP COMPANIES:
Retail:
 Future Value Retail Limited
PAGE 13
Finance:
 Future Generali Life Insurance Company Limited
 Future Generali (India) Insurance Company Limited
 Future Capital Holdings Limited
 Future Ventures (India) Limited
Services:
 Future Supply Chains Limited
 Future Human Development Limited Future Media (India) Limited
 Future Corporate Resources Limited
*****
PAGE 14
PAGE 15
Customer: The term “customer” is typically used to refer to one who
regularly purchase from a particular store or company. The “consumer” more
generally refers to anyone engaging in any of the activities (evaluating, acquiring,
using or disposing of goods and services) used in the definition of consumer
behaviour. Therefore, a “customer” is defined in terms of specific firm while
consumer is not. Customers are value maximiser within the bounds of search
costs, limited knowledge, mobility and income. The most commonly thought of
consumer situation is that of an individual making a purchase with little or no
influence of others. A consumer or buyer is one who determines personal wants,
buys products and uses those products. The traditional viewpoint defines
consumers strictly in terms of economic goods and services or one who consumes
goods.
The “customer is king” philosophy has become one of those marketing fads and
fashions that have continued to trail the growth and expansion of the product
economy. The term consumer is often used to describe two different kinds of
consuming entities personal consumer and organisational consumer. Ultimate
consumers are those individuals who purchases for the purpose of individual or
household consumption. Organisational consumers are those who buy products
and services in order to run their business.
A customer is also called client, buyer, shopper or purchaser, usually used to refer
to a current or potential buyer or user of the products of an individual or
organisation called the supplier, seller, or vendor. This is typically through
purchasing or renting goods or services. However, in certain contexts, the term
customer also includes by extension anyone who uses or experiences the services
of another. A customer may also be a viewer of the product or service that is being
sold despite deciding not to buy them. The word customer is derived from
“custom,” meaning “habit”; a customer is someone who frequently buy from a
particular shop, who made it a habit to purchase goods or services rather than
elsewhere and with whom the shopkeeper had to maintain a relationship to keep
his or her “custom,” meaning expected purchases in the future. The slogans “the
customer is king” or “the customer is god” or “the customer is always right”
indicate the importance of customers to businesses - although the last expression
is sometimes used ironically.
The “consumer” more generally refers to anyone engaging in any of the activities
used in our definition of consumer behaviour. Therefore, a customer is defined in
terms of specific firm while consumer is not. The traditional viewpoint has
defined the behaviour as:-
PAGE 16
CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR AND BUYER BEHAVIOUR
Consumer behaviour is seen to involve a complicated mental process as well as
physical activity (purchase decision). Consumer behaviour is a decision process
and physical activity individuals engage in when evaluating, acquiring, using or
disposing of goods and services.
Consumer Behaviour reflects the totality of consumer’s decisions with respect to
the acquisition, consumption and disposition of goods, services, time and ideas
by (human) decision making units.
Buyer is the individual who actually makes the purchase transaction whereas user
is the person most directly involved in the consumption or use of the purchased
product. Buyer Behaviour particularly is the study of decision making units as
they can buy for themselves or others. Thus, buying behaviour particularly
involves collective response of buyers for selecting, evaluating, and deciding and
post purchase behaviour. Buyer behaviour is the study of human response to
services and the marketing of products and services. Buyer behaviour researches
continuously investigate a broad range of human responses including human
affective, cognitive and behavioural responses. The buying behaviour and
purchase decisions are need to be studied thoroughly in order to understand,
predict and analyse critical market variations of a particular product or service.
The field of consumer behaviour is the broad study of individuals, groups or
organisations and the process they use to select, secure and dispose of products,
services, experiences or ideas to satisfy needs and the impacts that these processes
have on the consumer and society. Consumer behaviour studies are based on the
buying behaviour of final consumers-individuals and households who buy goods
and services for themselves. The collective behaviour of consumers has a
significant influence on quality and level of standard of living. Buyer Behaviour
is broadly defined by various scholars and researchers as:
1. It’s the behaviour displayed by the consumers during the acquisition, use
and disposition of products/services, time and ideas by decision making
units.
2. It is the body of knowledge which studies various aspects of purchase and
consumption of products and services by individuals with various social
and psychological variables at play.
3. The process and activities people engage in when searching for, selecting,
purchasing, using, evaluating and disposing of products and services so as
to satisfy their needs and desires. The activities directly involved in
obtaining, consuming and disposing off products and services, including
the decision processes that precede and follow these actions.
PAGE 17
CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR: AN EMERGING FIELD OF STUDY
In the highly specialised study of “business management”, “business
administration” or just “management” today, “marketing management” function
plays a very critical role in business activities. This is because this functional area
of management:
(1) “Earns” the revenue and
(2) “Works” in the close proximity with the public or persons outside the
organisation.
Controlling these two attributes to have the desired benefits are the most difficult
part of the management, because none of these two are within the direct control
of the marketers. This does not mean that the other functional areas are not useful,
but they are not “directly” involved in the activities mentioned above.
Marketing consists of an interaction between buyer and seller for the purpose of
exchanging something valuable to the mutual benefit of both the parties to the
transaction. One cannot appreciate this marketing process by observing only the
seller, knowledge about consumer is a sound basis for marketing strategies and
decisions. Markets are selected on the basis of consumer wants, location,
characteristics and expenditure patterns. To ignore the customer can lead to
disaster in a modern economy.
Consumer behaviour has become an integral part of strategic market planning. It
is also the basis of the approach to the concept of “Holistic Marketing”. The belief
that ethics and corporate social responsibility should also be integral components
of every marketing decision is embodied in a revised marketing concept – the
societal marketing concept – which calls on marketers to fulfil the needs of their
target markets in ways that improve society as a whole.
Consumer or the “Customer” play a very critical role as these are the people who
finally buy the goods and services of the organisation and the firm is always on
the move to make them buy so as to earn revenue. It’s crucial from both the points
of view as given below:
From the customer’s point of view: Today, in the highly developed and
technologically advanced society, the customers have a great deal of choices and
options (often very close and competing) to decide on or compare;
(1) They have the products of an extreme range of products attributes (the 1st
P - Product).
(2) They have a wide range of cost and payment choices (the 2nd P - Price).
PAGE 18
(3) They can order them to be supplied to their door step or anywhere else (the
3rd P - Place) and
(4) Finally they are bombarded with more communications from more
channels of information than ever before with the invention of information
technology (the 4th P - Promotion).
From the marketer’s point of view: “The purpose of marketing is to sell more
stuff to more people more often for more money in order to make more profit.”
This is the basic principle of requirement for the marketers in earlier days where
aggressive selling was the primary aim. It cannot be achieved by force, aggression
or plain alluring. Customer today are more informed, more knowledgeable, more
demanding, more discerning and above all there is no dearth of marketers to buy
from. The marketers have to earn them or win them over. The global marketplace
is a study of diversity among consumers, producers, marketers, retailers,
advertising media, cultures, and customs and of course the individual or
psychological behaviour. However, despite prevailing diversities, there also are
many similarities. Consumer market is highly sensitive and driven by widely
diversified culture in many countries.
The study of consumer behaviour is also very important to the marketers because
it enables them to understand and predict buying behaviour of consumers in the
marketplace. It is concerned not only with what consumers buy, but also with
why they buy it, when, where, how they buy it, how often they buy it and also
how they enjoy the services. Consumer research is the methodology used to study
consumer behaviour; it takes place at every phase of the buying process: before
the purchase, during the purchase and after the purchase. Researches shows that
two different buyers buying the same product may have done it for different
reasons, paid different prices, used in different ways, have different emotional
attachments towards the things and so on. The market strategies are reframed to
achieve organisational objectives depending upon knowing, serving and
influencing consumers. This suggests that the knowledge and information about
consumers is critical for developing successful marketing strategies. The
relationship between consumers and marketers, consumer behaviour and
marketing strategy is instable to attain organisational objectives.
Consumer behaviour is interdisciplinary approach based on concepts and theories
about people that have been developed by behavioural scientists, philosophers
and researchers in diverse disciplines such as psychology, sociology, social
psychology, cultural anthropology and economics. The study of consumer
behaviour also helps management to understand consumer’s needs so as to
recognise the potential for the trend of development of change in consumer
requirements and new technology and also to articulate the new thing in terms of
the consumer’s needs so that it will be universally accepted in the market well.
PAGE 19
BUYER ROLES
For making strategic decisions the marketers have to identify the buyers who
make the final buying decisions. It is truly a big task before the marketers to
identify the target buyers of the particular service.
(1) Influencer: Several people may be involved in a particular purchase
decision, but all of them are not consumers. A person who has influence,
whose views or advice is given weightage while taking the final decision.
(2) Gatekeepers: Family members who control the flow of information about
a product or service into the family.
(3) Initiator: The person who is the first to suggest or think of the idea of
purchasing a product or service.
(4) Decider: The person who finally takes the decisions of whether to buy,
what to buy, how to buy and from where to buy.
(5) Buyer: The person who actually buy the product/service after making
payments.
(6) User: The person who actually uses or consumes the product or service.
Personal Factors That Affect People’s Buying Behavior
The Consumer’s Personality
Personality describes a person’s disposition as other people see it. The following
are the “Big Five” personality traits that psychologists discuss frequently:
(1) Openness. How open you are to new experiences.
(2) Conscientiousness. How diligent you are.
(3) Extraversion. How outgoing or shy you are.
(4) Agreeableness. How easy you are to get along with.
(5) Neuroticism. How prone you are to negative mental state.
PAGE 20
The Consumer’s Self Concept
Marketers have had better luck linking people’s self-concept to their buying
behavior. Your self-concept is how you see yourself—be it positive or negative.
Your ideal self is how you would like to see yourself—whether it’s prettier, more
popular or more eco-conscious.
Marketing researchers believe people buy products to enhance how they feel
about themselves—to get themselves closer to their ideal selves, in other words.
The slogan “Be All That You Can Be,” which for years was used by the U.S. Army
to recruit soldiers, is an attempt to appeal to the self-concept. Presumably, by
joining the U.S. Army, you will become a better version of yourself, which will,
in turn, improve your life. Many beauty products and cosmetic procedures are
advertised in a way that’s supposed to appeal to the ideal selves people are
searching for. All of us want products that improve our lives.
The Consumer’s Gender
Everyone knows that men and women buy different products. Physiologically
speaking, they simply need different product—different underwear, shoes,
toiletries, and a host of other products. Men and women also shop differently.
One study by Resource Interactive, a technology research firm, found that when
shopping online, men prefer sites with lots of pictures of products; women prefer
to see products online in lifestyle context—say, a lamp in a living room. Women
are also twice as likely as men to use viewing tools such as the zoom and rotate
buttons and links that allow them to change the colour of products.
In general, men have a different attitude about shopping than women do.
The shopping differences between men and women seem to be changing, though.
Many businesses today are taking greater pains to figure out “what men want.”
Products such as face toners and body washes for men, such as the Axe brand,
are a relatively new phenomenon. So are hair salons such as the Men’s Zone and
Weldon Barber. Some advertising agencies specialize in advertising directed at
men. Keep in mind that there are also many items targeted toward women that
weren’t in the past, including products such as kayaks and mountain bikes.
PAGE 21
The Consumer’s Age and Stage of Life
You have probably noticed that the things you buy have changed as your age.
When you were a child, the last thing you probably wanted as a gift was clothing.
As you became a teen, however, cool clothes probably became a bigger priority.
Companies understand that people buy different things based on their ages and
life stages. Aging baby boomers are a huge market that companies are trying to
tap. Ford and other car companies have created “aging suits” for young
employees to wear when they’re designing automobiles. The suit simulates the
restricted mobility and vision people experience as they get older. Car designers
can then figure out how to configure the automobiles to better meet the needs of
these consumers.
Your chronological age, or actual age in years, is one thing. Your cognitive age,
or how old you perceive yourself to be, is another. In other words, how old do
you really feel? A person’s cognitive age affects the activities one engages in and
sparks interests consistent with the person’s perceived age. Cognitive age is a
significant predictor of consumer behaviours, including people’s dining out,
watching television, going to bars and dance clubs, playing computer games, and
shopping. How old people “feel” they are has important implications for
marketing professionals. For example, companies have found that many “aged”
consumers don’t take kindly to products that feature “old folks.” The consumers
can’t identify with them because they see themselves as being younger.
The Consumer’s Lifestyle
Two consumers (say, you and your best friend) can be similar in age, personality,
gender, and so on but still purchase very different products.
To better understand consumers and connect with them, companies have begun
looking more closely at consumers’ lifestyles. This often includes asking
consumers to fill out extensive questionnaires or conducting in-depth interviews
with them. The questionnaires go beyond asking people about the products they
like, where they live, and what sex they are. Instead, researchers ask people what
they do—that is, how they spend their time and what their priorities, values, and
general outlooks on the world are. Where do they go other than work? Who do
they like to talk to? What do they talk about?
PAGE 22
The Consumer’s Decision-Making Process
Stage 1. Need Recognition
Stage 2. Search for Information
Stage 3. Product Evaluation
Stage 4. Product Choice and Purchase
Stage 5. Post purchase Use and Evaluation
Stage 6. Disposal of the Product
Low-Involvement versus High-Involvement Buying Decisions:
Consumers don’t necessarily go through all the buying stages when they’re
considering purchasing product. You have probably thought about many products
you want or need but never did much more than that. At other times, you’ve
probably looked at dozens of products, compared them, and then decided not to
purchase any one of them. At yet other times, you skip stages 1 through 3 and
buy products on impulse. Purchasing a product with no planning or forethought
is called impulse buying.
Impulse buying brings up a concept called level of involvement—that is, how
personally important or interested you are in consuming a product. Low-
involvement products aren’t necessarily purchased on impulse, although they
can be. Low-involvement products are, however, inexpensive and pose a low risk
to the buyer if he/she makes a mistake by purchasing them.
By contrast, high-involvement products carry a high risk to buyers if they fail,
are complex, or have high price tags. A car, a house, and an insurance policy are
examples. These items are not purchased often. Buyers don’t engage in routine
response behaviour when purchasing high-involvement products. Instead,
consumers engage in what’s called extended problem solving, where they spend
a lot of time comparing the features of the products, prices, warrantees, and so
forth.
High-involvement products can cause buyers a great deal of post-purchase
dissonance if they are unsure about their purchases. Companies that sell high-
PAGE 23
involvement products are aware of that post-purchase dissonance can be a
problem. Frequently, they try to offer consumers a lot of information about their
products, including why they are superior to competing brands and how they
won’t let the consumer down. Salespeople are typically utilized to do a lot of
customer “hand-holding.”
Limited problem solving falls somewhere in the middle. Consumers engage in
limited problem solving when they already have some information about a good
or service but continue to search for a bit more information.
Situational Factors That Affect People’s Buying Behaviour
The Consumer’s Physical Situation
Have you ever been in a department store and couldn’t find your way out? No,
you aren’t necessarily directionally challenged. Marketing professionals take
physical factors such as a store’s design and layout into account when they are
designing their facilities. Presumably, the longer you wander around a facility,
the more you will spend. Grocery stores frequently place bread and milk products
on the opposite ends of the stores because people often need both types of
products. To buy both, they have to walk around an entire store, which of course,
is loaded with other items they might see and purchase.
Physical factors like these—the ones over which firms have control—are called
atmospherics. In addition to store locations, they include the music played at
stores, the lighting, temperature, and even the smells you experience. Perhaps
you’ve visited the office of an apartment complex and noticed how great it looked
and even smelled. It’s no coincidence. The managers of the complex were trying
to get you to stay for a while and have a look at their facilities. Research shows
that “strategic fragrancing” results in customers staying in stores longer, buying
more, and leaving with better impression of the quality of stores’ services and
products. Mirrors near hotel elevators are another example Hotel operators have
found that when people are busy looking at themselves in the mirrors, they don’t
feel like they are waiting as long for their elevators.
The Consumer’s Social Situation
The social situation you’re in can significantly affect what you will buy, how
much of it, and when. Perhaps you have seen Girl Scouts selling cookies outside
grocery stores and other retail establishments and purchased nothing from them.
But what if your neighbour’s daughter is selling the cookies? Are you going to
turn her down, or be a friendly neighbour and buy a box (or two)?
PAGE 24
Companies like Avon and Tupperware that sell their products at parties
understand that the social situation you’re in makes a difference.
The Consumer’s Time Situation
The time of day, the time of year, and how much time consumers feel like they
have to shop also affects what they buy. Researchers have even discovered
whether someone is a “morning person” or “evening person” affects shopping
patterns. Seven-Eleven Japan is a company that’s extremely in tune to physical
factors such as time and how it affects buyers. The company’s point-of-sale
systems at its checkout counters monitor what is selling well and when, and stores
are restocked with those items immediately—sometimes via motorcycle deliveries
that zip in and out of traffic along Japan’s crowded streets. The goal is to get the
products on the shelves when and where consumers want them. Seven-Eleven
Japan also knows that, like Americans, its customers are “time starved.”
Shoppers can pay their utility bills, local taxes, and insurance or pension
premiums at Seven-Eleven Japan stores, and even make photocopies.
The Consumer’s Mood
People’s moods temporarily affect their spending patterns. Some people enjoy
shopping. It’s entertaining for them. At the extreme are compulsive spenders who
get a temporary “high” from spending.
A sour mood can spoil a consumer’s desire to shop.
To get buyers in the shopping mood, companies resorted to different measures.
The upscale retailer Neiman Marcus began introducing more mid-priced brands.
By studying customer’s loyalty cards, the French hypermarket Carrefour hoped
to find ways to get its customers to purchase non-food items that have higher
profit margins.
*****
PAGE 25
BUYING BEHAVIOUR OF CONSUMERS
There are 4 major types of buying behaviors based on the consumer’s
involvement as well as differences in related brands.
1. Complex buying behaviour
2. Variety seeking behaviour
3. Dissonance reducing buying behaviour
4. Habitual buying behaviour
1. Complex buying behaviour: In this type of buying behaviour consumers
are highly involved as well as there is a significant differences between
brands. For example: Car, Flat, Plot etc.
2. Variety seeking behaviour: In this type of buying behaviour there is a low
involvement but there is a significant differences between brands, the
consumer can himself make the purchase decision. For example: Perfumes,
incense sticks etc.
COMPLEX BUYING BEHAVIOR VARIETY SEEKING BEHAVIOR
TYPES OF
BUYING
BEHAVIOR
DISSONANCE REDUCING
BUYING BEHAVIOR
HABITUAL BUYING BEHAVIOR
PAGE 26
3. Dissonance reducing buying behaviour: In this type of buying behaviour
consumers are highly involved due to very few differences between brands.
The consumer only cannot make the purchase decision alone. For example:
Gold jewelleries, Furniture, durables etc.
4. Habitual buying behaviour: In this type consumers are less involved in
making the purchase decision because the daily use products are
considered. For example: Toothpaste, detergent, Hair oil etc.
*****
PAGE 27
PAGE 28
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Research is a systematic method of finding solutions to problems. It is essentially
an investigation, a recording and an analysis of evidence for the purpose of
gaining knowledge. According to Clifford woody, “research comprises of
defining and redefining problem, formulating hypothesis or suggested solutions,
collecting, organizing and evaluating data, reaching conclusions, testing
conclusions to determine whether they fit the formulated hypothesis”.
RESEARCH DESIGN:
According to this study investigation was conducted for some definite purpose
with the help of a structural & personal Interview and Questionnaire to gather
primary information as much as possible.
My study deals with Descriptive Research Design. Descriptive research, also
known as statistical research, describes data and characteristics about the
population or phenomenon being studied. Descriptive research answers the
questions who, what, where, when and how.
SAMPLING DESIGN:
Sampling Frame: The respondents are the customers from Big Bazaar, Bokaro
Steel City.
Sampling Method: A sample design is a finite plan for obtaining a sample from
a given population. Convenience sampling is used for this study.
Sample Size: Number of the sampling units selected from the population is called
the size of the sample. Sample of 100 respondents were obtained.
Sampling Procedure: The procedure adopted in the present study is non-
probability convenience sampling.
PAGE 29
METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION:
The data was collected through Primary sources only.
QUESTIONNAIRE DESIGN:
A well-defined questionnaire that is used effectively can gather information on
both overall performance of the test system as well as information on specific
components of the system. A defeated questionnaire was carefully prepared and
specially numbered. The questions were arranged in proper order, in accordance
with the relevance.
Pros of questionnaire:
 It can be used as a method in its own right or as a basis for interviewing or
a telephonic survey.
 It can be posted, e-mailed or faxed.
 It can cover a large number of people or organizations.
 It has wide geographic coverage.
 It is relatively cheap.
 No prior arrangements are needed.
 It avoids embarrassment on the part of the respondent.
 Respondent can consider responses.
 Possible anonymity of respondent.
 No interviewer bias.
Cons of questionnaire:
 Design problems.
 Questions have to be relatively simple.
 Historically low response rate (although inducements may help).
 Time delay whilst waiting for responses to be returned.
 Require a return deadline.
 Assumes no literacy problems.
 No control over who completes it.
 Problems with incomplete questionnaires.
 Replies not spontaneous and independent of each other.
 Respondent can read all questions beforehand and then decide whether to
complete or not. For example, perhaps because it is too long, too complex,
uninteresting, or too personal.
PAGE 30
Nature of Questions Asked:
The questionnaire consists of closed ended questions and rating method.
Presentation of Data:
The data are presented through graphs, charts and tables.
DATA ANALYSIS
Data analysis is done through Statistical Tools:
 Pie Charts.
 Bar Charts.
 Horizontal Bar Charts.
Procedure for Analysis:
 Administering questionnaire to all the customers visiting Big Bazaar,
Bokaro.
 Analyse the rating and responses of the customers using graphs and
evaluating the positivity of responses.
LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY:
The limitations of the study are the following:
1. The data was collected through questionnaire. The response from the
respondents may not be accurate.
2. The sample taken for the study was only 100 and from only one store so the
results drawn may not be accurate.
3. Another difficulty was very limited time-span of the project.
4. Lack of experience of Researcher.
*****
PAGE 31
PAGE 32
AGE GROUP
70
60 63%
50
40
30
17%
20
17%
3%
10
0
TEENAGERS YOUTHS MID AGED OLD AGED
DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS
ANALYSIS BASED ON QUESTIONS ASKED.
TABLE 1: What is your age?
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. TEENAGERS 17 17%
2. YOUTHS 63 63%
3. MID AGED 17 17%
4. OLD AGED 03 03%
INTERPRETATION:
Out of all the customers interviewed, the above graph shows that the footfall at
Big Bazaar, Bokaro constitutes 63% of youths(20 to 35 years), 17% of both
teenagers as well as mid aged(36 to 60 years) and 3% of the customers are of old
ages(above 60 years).
PAGE 33
QUALIFICATION
DOCTORATE
POST GRADUATE
19%
1% MATRICULATION
15%
INTERMEDIATE
16%
GRADUATION
49%
TABLE 2: What is your qualification?
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. MATRICULATE 15 15%
2. INTERMEDIATE 16 16%
3. GRADUATE 49 49%
4. POST GRADUATE 19 19%
5. DOCTORATE 01 01%
INTERPRETATION:
Among all the customers interviewed 49% of them were found to have bachelor
degree, 19% of the customers had completed their master’s degree, 15% of the
customers were matriculate and 16% out of the customers were intermediate.
PAGE 34
HOUSEWIFE
3%
OCCUPATION
BUSINESSMEN
11%
EMPLOYEE
41%
STUDENT
42%
RETIRED
3%
EMPLOYEE RETIRED STUDENT HOUSEWIFE BUSINESSMEN
TABLE 3: What is your profession?
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. EMPLOYEE 41 41%
2. BUSINESSMEN 11 11%
3. HOUSE-WIFE 03 03%
4. STUDENT 42 42%
5. RETIRED 03 03%
INTERPRETATION:
Coming to the occupation of the customers interviewed, most of the customers
visiting Big Bazaar are students (42%) and employees (41%). 11% customers are
businessmen, 3% of the customers are found to be housewives and retired
personnel.
PAGE 35
INCOME CHART
60 56%
50
40
30
20
19%
13% 12%
10
0
LESS THAN ₹10K 10K-₹30K ₹30K-₹50K ABOVE ₹50K
TABLE 4: What is your monthly income?
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. LESS THAN ₹10000 56 56%
2. ₹10000 TO ₹30000 13 13%
3. ₹30000 TO ₹50000 19 19%
4. ABOVE ₹50000 12 12%
INTERPRETATION:
The above chart shows that 56% of the interviewed customers are found to have
a monthly income of less than ₹10,000 (includes students also, their pocket
money is also considered as income as they tend to spend that money while
making transactions at Big Bazaar). 13% of the customers have an income of
₹10K to ₹30K, 19% of the customers have an income between ₹30K to ₹50K and
12% of the customers were found to have an income more than ₹50,000.
PAGE 36
60
53%
50
40 37%
30
20
12%
10 8%
0
FAMILY SPOUSE FRIENDS ALONE
TABLE 5: With whom do you like to go shopping?
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. FAMILY 53 53%
2. SPOUSE 08 08%
3. FRIENDS 37 37%
4. ALONE 12 12%
INTERPRETATION:
The above bar chart shows that 53% of the customers like to visit Big Bazaar with
their family and 8% customers like to visit with their spouse. 37% of the
customers have an interest in visiting with their friends whereas 12% of the
customers find it comfortable in visiting alone.
PAGE 37
FREQUENCY
UNPLANNED BASIS 22%
QUARTERLY 8%
MONTHLY 40%
WEEKLY 30%
0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45
TABLE 6: How frequently do you visit Big Bazaar?
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. WEEKLY 22 22%
2. MONTHLY 08 08%
3. QUARTERLY 40 40%
4. UNPLANNED BASIS 30 30%
INTERPRETATION:
When the customers were asked about their visiting frequency, it was found that
30% of the customers visit weekly, 40% visit monthly, 8% of them visit quarterly
and 22% are found to visit on an unplanned basis.
PAGE 38
PURCHASE AREA
60 55%
50
40
29%
30
23%
20
10
07%
FOOD ITEMS ELECTRONICS FASHION OTHERS
TABLE 7: What kind of products you usually purchase at Big Bazaar?
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. FOOD ITEMS 29 29%
2. ELECTRONICS 07 07%
3. FASHION 55 55%
4. OTHERS 23 23%
INTERPRETATION:
Out of the total customers interviewed, 55% of the customers are interested in
buying fashion apparels from Big Bazaar, whereas 29% customers are interested
in buying food items and least were interested in buying electronic items. 23% of
the customers were found to be interested in items other than food, electronics,
and fashion products. They might have interested in buying other products
available in the store such as soap, shampoo, toothpaste, perfumes etc.
PAGE 39
35% 34%
31%
TABLE 8: On which days do you prefer to visit Big Bazaar?
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. WEEKENDS 37 34%
2. WEEK DAYS 34 31%
3. BIG OFFER DAYS 38 35%
INTERPRETATION:
When the customers were asked about their preferred visiting days, it was found
that 38% of the customers visit on BIG OFFER DAYS, 37% visit on weekends,
34% of them visit on week days.
WEEKENDS WEEK DAYS BIG OFFER DAYS
PAGE 40
TABLE 9: On which time do you prefer to visit Big Bazaar?
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. FORENOON 02 02%
2. AFTERNOON 34 34%
3. NOT FIXED 63 63%
INTERPRETATION:
When the customers were asked about their visiting time, it was found that 34%
of the customers visit in the afternoon, 2% visit in morning, 63% of them have no
fixed time of visiting Big Bazaar.
2%
34%
63%
FORENOON AFTERNOON NOT FIXED
PAGE 41
DEPENDS ON
CATEGORY
35%
YES
25%
NO
40%
TABLE 10: Do you come with a planned list of items while visiting Big Bazaar?
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. YES 25 25%
2. NO 40 40%
3. DEPENDS ON CATEGORY 35 35%
INTERPRETATION:
The above pie-chart shows that 40% of the customers do not visit with a planned
list of items to purchase at Big Bazaar, 25% of the customers mentioned that they
visit with a planned list and 35% said that their visit is unplanned and their
purchase depends on the products available in different sections.
PAGE 42
PIE-CHARTS BASED ON ATTRIBUTES RATED BY THE CUSTOMERS.
TABLE 11: PRICE
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. POOR 04 04%
2. AVERAGE 51 51%
3. GOOD 40 40%
4. EXCELLENT 05 05%
INTERPRETATIONS:
Customers were asked to rate the various attributes of Big Bazaar such as Price
of the products available. 51% of the total interviewed customers rated the prices
to be average, 40% customers rated the prices good, 5% customers rated excellent
whereas 4% customers found the prices to be poor.
5% 4%
40%
51%
POOR AVERAGE GOOD EXCELLENT
PAGE 43
TABLE 12: QUALITY
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. POOR 03 03%
2. AVERAGE 25 25%
3. GOOD 55 55%
4. EXCELLENT 17 17%
INTERPRETATIONS:
Customers were asked to rate the quality of products available at Big Bazaar. 55%
of the customers rated the quality of product as good, 17% of them rated quality
of products as excellent, 25% customers rated the quality as average whereas 3%
of the customers rated quality as poor.
POOR AVERAGE GOOD EXCELLENT
3%
17%
25%
55%
PAGE 44
TABLE 13: ARRANGEMENTS
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. POOR 02 02%
2. AVERAGE 17 17%
3. GOOD 53 53%
4. EXCELLENT 28 28%
INTERPRETATIONS:
Customers were asked to rate the arrangement of the products available at Big
Bazaar. 53% of the customers rated the arrangement of products as good, 17% of
them rated the arrangement of products as good, 28% customers rated the
arrangement as excellent whereas 2% of the customers rated arrangements as
poor.
2%
17%
28%
53%
POOR
AVERAGE
GOOD
EXCELLENT
PAGE 45
12% 3%
34%
51%
TABLE 14: DISCOUNT/OFFERS
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. POOR 03 03%
2. AVERAGE 34 34%
3. GOOD 51 51%
4. EXCELLENT 12 12%
INTERPRETATIONS:
Customers were asked to rate the discounts/offers on products available at Big
Bazaar. 51% of the customers rated discounts/offers on products as good, 34% of
them rated discounts/offers on products as average, 12% customers rated the
discounts/offers as excellent whereas 3% of the customers rated discounts/offers
on products as poor. It can be said that customers are satisfied with the
discounts/offers on products available at Big Bazaar.
POOR
AVERAGE
GOOD
EXCELLENT
PAGE 46
13% 15%
25%
47%
TABLE 15: BILLING
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. POOR 15 15%
2. AVERAGE 25 25%
3. GOOD 47 47%
4. EXCELLENT 13 13%
INTERPRETATIONS:
Customers were asked to rate the billing process at Big Bazaar. 47% of the
customers rated billing process as good, 25% of them rated billing process as
average, and 13% customers rated the billing process as excellent whereas 15%
of the customers rated billing process as poor.
POOR
AVERAGE
GOOD
EXCELLENT
PAGE 47
TABLE 16: PRODUCT AVAILABILITY
S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1. POOR 03 03%
2. AVERAGE 29 29%
3. GOOD 48 48%
4. EXCELLENT 20 20%
INTERPRETATIONS:
Customers were asked to rate the product availability at Big Bazaar. 48% of the
customers rated product availability as good, 29% of them rated product
availability as average, and 20% customers rated the product availability as
excellent whereas 3% of the customers rated product availability as poor.
3%
20%
29%
48%
POOR
AVERAGE
GOOD
EXCELLENT
PAGE 48
PAGE 49
RECOMMENDATIONS
 Customers do come unplanned and their purchase decision depends upon product
category, attractive display and employee’s efforts may gain sales.
 Customers are found to have a keen interest in visiting unplanned and mostly during
evening at Big Bazaar, employees should stay active during this time to gain sales.
 During the forenoon Big Bazaar should provide some offers to its customers so that
customers would be encouraged to visit Big Bazaar.
 Big Bazaar, Bokaro needs to boost the sales in its electronics section through various
means such as visual merchandising, live demo and attractive offers. The study points
towards low interest of customers towards this section.
 Price of the products should be more affordable, 51% customers have rated price as
average.
 Quality has been rated good but there is always a chance of enhancement in quality.
 Arrangements also has been rated good by 53% customers, timely change in
arrangements will break the monotony of the store but it may make it difficult for the
customers to find the product.
 15% customers has rated billing process as poor, appropriate steps should be taken to
lessen such experiences of the customers.
 There should be different billing counters for different customers. Cash counter and Card
payment counter should be placed differently in order to reduce the rush and save the
customer’s time. This will be a kind of motivator for the customers of Big Bazaar for
making cashless payments.
*****
PAGE 50
PAGE 51
CONCLUSION
Big bazaar is a major shopping complex for today’s customers. It is a place where customers
find variety of products at a reasonable price. Big bazaar has a good reputation of itself in the
market. It has positioned itself in the market as a discounted store. It holds a huge customer
base. The majority of customers belong to middle class family. The teenagers and youth
generation also likes shopping and moving around big bazaar. Volume sales always take place
in big bazaar. Impulse buying behavior of customers comes in to play most of the times in big
bazaar.
Big bazaar is a hypermarket as it provides various kinds of goods like apparels, grocery,
stationary, food items, electronic items, leather items, watches, crockery, decorative items,
sport items, chocolates and many more. It competes with all the specialty stores of different
products which provide goods at a discounted rate throughout the year. It seemed from the
study that the customers are quite satisfied with Big Bazaar.
Big bazaar is a hypermarket store where varieties of products are being sold on different
product category. It has emerged as a hub of shopping specially for middle class people.
Different types of products starting from a baby food to large home appliances all available
under one roof. At Bokaro it is the middle class people who mostly do shopping from Big
Bazaar. Even most of the people do their monthly shopping from Big Bazaar. People not only
visit Big Bazaar to do shopping but also visit for outing purpose as it provides a very nice
ambience to its customers. As people go to malls they just tend to move around Big Bazaar
whether it is for shopping purpose or for outing purpose. Grocery, apparels and food items are
the products which are demanded most by the customers of Bokaro at Big Bazaar. As it is
surveyed it seems that the biggest competitors of Big Bazaar are the kirana stores, discounted
specialty stores like Vishal mega mart, The Tata Groups (Croma), Reliance Retail, & Sabka
Bazaar but all the above mentioned stores are not present in Bokaro.
Advantage to Big Bazaar is that it has been strategically located at the center point of a
strategically developed sectors of Bokaro Steel City, being in the center makes it affordable for
the SAIL employees living in the different sectors to purchase their monthly ration from Big
Bazaar at higher discounts compared to general stores.
*****
PAGE 52
PAGE 53
LIMITATIONS
 Customers were reluctant to answer the questionnaire.
 Due to less time only 100 customer’s responses were obtained and recorded.
 Females were highly reluctant in filling the questionnaire.
 The data obtained are based on customers of Big Bazaar, Bokaro only.
 Less time in hands of the customers may have led to inappropriate entry.
 Student’s monthly income has been considered as less than ₹10,000.
 Customers had more than one option to choose form and tick.
 Customer’s literacy level may have affected the study.
*****
PAGE 54
PAGE 55
REFERENCES
 Schiffman Lenon G. & Kanuk Leslie Lazar (2006). Consumer Behaviour.
Prentice Hall of India.
 Kotler, Philip. (2002). Marketing Management. Prentice Hall of India.
 Loudon, David L. & Bitta Albert J. Della., (2004). Consumer Behaviour.
Second edition. Mc-Grawhill.
 Naresh K. Malhotra (2010). Marketing Research, 6th
Edition, Pearson
Publications.
*****
PAGE 56
PART: I
ANNEXURE
QUESTIONNAIRE
NAME: AGE: Years
GENDER: MALE: FEMALE:
QUALIFICATION: 10th
: 12th
: Graduate: Post Graduate:
OCCUPATION: Employee: Businessmen: Student:
MARITAL STATUS: SINGLE MARRIED
PART: II
1) What is your monthly income?
A) Less than 10000 C) 10000 – 30000
B) 30000 – 50000 D) Above 50000
2) With whom do you like to go shopping?
A) Family B) Friends C) Spouse D) Others
3) How frequently do you visit Big Bazaar?
A) Weekly B) Monthly C) Quarterly D) Unplanned basis
4) What kind of products you usually purchase at Big Bazaar?
A) Foods B) Electronics C) Fashion D) Others
5) On which days do you prefer to visit Big Bazaar?
A) Weekend B) Week Days C) Big Offer Days
6) In which time do you prefer to visit Big Bazaar?
A) Forenoon B) Afternoon C) Not fixed
7) Do you come with a planned list of items while visiting Big Bazaar?
A) YES B) NO C) Depends on
category
8) Rate the following attributes of Big Bazaar.
S.No. ATTRIBUTES POOR AVERAGE GOOD EXCELLENT
1. PRICE
2. QUALITY
3. ARRANGEMENT
4. DISCOUNT/ OFFERS
5. BILLING
6. PRODUCT
AVAILABILITY
PAGE 57
THANKS FOR YOUR RESPONSE.

More Related Content

Similar to Consumer Buying Behavior at Big Bazaar

Organised retailing and consumer perceptions in Indian mid size cities _Big B...
Organised retailing and consumer perceptions in Indian mid size cities _Big B...Organised retailing and consumer perceptions in Indian mid size cities _Big B...
Organised retailing and consumer perceptions in Indian mid size cities _Big B...Ravi G
 
MBA Marketing SIP Report
MBA Marketing SIP ReportMBA Marketing SIP Report
MBA Marketing SIP Reportdharam93
 
project-report-on-big-bazaar
 project-report-on-big-bazaar project-report-on-big-bazaar
project-report-on-big-bazaarTajinder Singh
 
A project report on big bazaar
A project report on big bazaarA project report on big bazaar
A project report on big bazaarSwati Anand
 
Big bazaar customer relationship management
Big bazaar customer relationship managementBig bazaar customer relationship management
Big bazaar customer relationship managementAman Bansal
 
A Study on Operational Management at Big Bazaar
A Study on Operational Management at Big BazaarA Study on Operational Management at Big Bazaar
A Study on Operational Management at Big BazaarDANISH AZFAR
 
A study on the customer preference and perceptions on Big Bazaar
A study on the customer preference and perceptions on Big Bazaar A study on the customer preference and perceptions on Big Bazaar
A study on the customer preference and perceptions on Big Bazaar NitinJames
 
Big bazaar and_d-mart
Big bazaar and_d-martBig bazaar and_d-mart
Big bazaar and_d-martSarla Jaiswal
 
0601027 analysis of customer relationship management
0601027 analysis of customer relationship management0601027 analysis of customer relationship management
0601027 analysis of customer relationship managementSupa Buoy
 
Big bazaar and_d-mart
Big bazaar and_d-martBig bazaar and_d-mart
Big bazaar and_d-martZameer Mirza
 
Big bazaar buying behaviour of customers (1)
Big bazaar   buying behaviour of customers (1)Big bazaar   buying behaviour of customers (1)
Big bazaar buying behaviour of customers (1)aquib rasheed
 
A STUDY ON CONSUMER SATISFACTION AT BIG BAZAAR
A STUDY ON CONSUMER SATISFACTION AT BIG BAZAARA STUDY ON CONSUMER SATISFACTION AT BIG BAZAAR
A STUDY ON CONSUMER SATISFACTION AT BIG BAZAARShashi Kishore
 
A study on buying behavior of customers in big bazaar
A study on buying behavior of customers in big bazaarA study on buying behavior of customers in big bazaar
A study on buying behavior of customers in big bazaarPrakash Royal
 

Similar to Consumer Buying Behavior at Big Bazaar (20)

Big bazar
Big bazarBig bazar
Big bazar
 
Big bazar
Big bazarBig bazar
Big bazar
 
Organised retailing and consumer perceptions in Indian mid size cities _Big B...
Organised retailing and consumer perceptions in Indian mid size cities _Big B...Organised retailing and consumer perceptions in Indian mid size cities _Big B...
Organised retailing and consumer perceptions in Indian mid size cities _Big B...
 
MBA Marketing SIP Report
MBA Marketing SIP ReportMBA Marketing SIP Report
MBA Marketing SIP Report
 
Crm big bazar
Crm  big bazarCrm  big bazar
Crm big bazar
 
project-report-on-big-bazaar
 project-report-on-big-bazaar project-report-on-big-bazaar
project-report-on-big-bazaar
 
yedu tajsekhar
yedu tajsekharyedu tajsekhar
yedu tajsekhar
 
A project report on big bazaar
A project report on big bazaarA project report on big bazaar
A project report on big bazaar
 
Big bazaar customer relationship management
Big bazaar customer relationship managementBig bazaar customer relationship management
Big bazaar customer relationship management
 
A Study on Operational Management at Big Bazaar
A Study on Operational Management at Big BazaarA Study on Operational Management at Big Bazaar
A Study on Operational Management at Big Bazaar
 
A study on the customer preference and perceptions on Big Bazaar
A study on the customer preference and perceptions on Big Bazaar A study on the customer preference and perceptions on Big Bazaar
A study on the customer preference and perceptions on Big Bazaar
 
Synopsis-bb
Synopsis-bbSynopsis-bb
Synopsis-bb
 
Slide share
Slide shareSlide share
Slide share
 
Big bazaar and_d-mart
Big bazaar and_d-martBig bazaar and_d-mart
Big bazaar and_d-mart
 
0601027 analysis of customer relationship management
0601027 analysis of customer relationship management0601027 analysis of customer relationship management
0601027 analysis of customer relationship management
 
Big bazaar and_d-mart
Big bazaar and_d-martBig bazaar and_d-mart
Big bazaar and_d-mart
 
Project Report
Project ReportProject Report
Project Report
 
Big bazaar buying behaviour of customers (1)
Big bazaar   buying behaviour of customers (1)Big bazaar   buying behaviour of customers (1)
Big bazaar buying behaviour of customers (1)
 
A STUDY ON CONSUMER SATISFACTION AT BIG BAZAAR
A STUDY ON CONSUMER SATISFACTION AT BIG BAZAARA STUDY ON CONSUMER SATISFACTION AT BIG BAZAAR
A STUDY ON CONSUMER SATISFACTION AT BIG BAZAAR
 
A study on buying behavior of customers in big bazaar
A study on buying behavior of customers in big bazaarA study on buying behavior of customers in big bazaar
A study on buying behavior of customers in big bazaar
 

More from PrinceVerma938105

ABHINAV MANGI REPOERT NEW.pdf
ABHINAV MANGI REPOERT NEW.pdfABHINAV MANGI REPOERT NEW.pdf
ABHINAV MANGI REPOERT NEW.pdfPrinceVerma938105
 
ROSHNI KUMARI PANDEY new file.pdf
ROSHNI KUMARI PANDEY new file.pdfROSHNI KUMARI PANDEY new file.pdf
ROSHNI KUMARI PANDEY new file.pdfPrinceVerma938105
 
prince report new updated NEW FILE.pdf
prince report new updated NEW FILE.pdfprince report new updated NEW FILE.pdf
prince report new updated NEW FILE.pdfPrinceVerma938105
 
DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING IN INDIA Ajay 27-05-23 (1).pdf
DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING IN INDIA Ajay 27-05-23 (1).pdfDIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING IN INDIA Ajay 27-05-23 (1).pdf
DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING IN INDIA Ajay 27-05-23 (1).pdfPrinceVerma938105
 
AMAN SRIVASTAVA BRP REPORT.pdf
AMAN SRIVASTAVA BRP REPORT.pdfAMAN SRIVASTAVA BRP REPORT.pdf
AMAN SRIVASTAVA BRP REPORT.pdfPrinceVerma938105
 
MUKESH MAURYA BRP REPORT.pdf
MUKESH MAURYA BRP REPORT.pdfMUKESH MAURYA BRP REPORT.pdf
MUKESH MAURYA BRP REPORT.pdfPrinceVerma938105
 
SHIVANGNA RATHOUR BRP REPORT.pdf
SHIVANGNA RATHOUR BRP REPORT.pdfSHIVANGNA RATHOUR BRP REPORT.pdf
SHIVANGNA RATHOUR BRP REPORT.pdfPrinceVerma938105
 
MD ATHUAL 25-05-2023 NEW.pdf
MD ATHUAL 25-05-2023 NEW.pdfMD ATHUAL 25-05-2023 NEW.pdf
MD ATHUAL 25-05-2023 NEW.pdfPrinceVerma938105
 
A STUDY ON RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION PROCESS nandini gupta new updated (1).pdf
A STUDY ON RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION PROCESS nandini gupta new updated (1).pdfA STUDY ON RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION PROCESS nandini gupta new updated (1).pdf
A STUDY ON RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION PROCESS nandini gupta new updated (1).pdfPrinceVerma938105
 
A STUDY OF SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING akhil report (1).pdf
A STUDY OF SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING akhil report (1).pdfA STUDY OF SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING akhil report (1).pdf
A STUDY OF SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING akhil report (1).pdfPrinceVerma938105
 
UNDERSTAND THE ECOSYSTEM IN DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING VICKY KUMAR.pdf
UNDERSTAND THE ECOSYSTEM IN DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING VICKY KUMAR.pdfUNDERSTAND THE ECOSYSTEM IN DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING VICKY KUMAR.pdf
UNDERSTAND THE ECOSYSTEM IN DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING VICKY KUMAR.pdfPrinceVerma938105
 

More from PrinceVerma938105 (17)

RANVIJAY SINGH REPRT.pdf
RANVIJAY SINGH REPRT.pdfRANVIJAY SINGH REPRT.pdf
RANVIJAY SINGH REPRT.pdf
 
ABHINAV MANGI REPOERT NEW.pdf
ABHINAV MANGI REPOERT NEW.pdfABHINAV MANGI REPOERT NEW.pdf
ABHINAV MANGI REPOERT NEW.pdf
 
oneplus report ABHISHEK.pdf
oneplus report ABHISHEK.pdfoneplus report ABHISHEK.pdf
oneplus report ABHISHEK.pdf
 
ROSHNI KUMARI PANDEY new file.pdf
ROSHNI KUMARI PANDEY new file.pdfROSHNI KUMARI PANDEY new file.pdf
ROSHNI KUMARI PANDEY new file.pdf
 
prince report new updated NEW FILE.pdf
prince report new updated NEW FILE.pdfprince report new updated NEW FILE.pdf
prince report new updated NEW FILE.pdf
 
DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING IN INDIA Ajay 27-05-23 (1).pdf
DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING IN INDIA Ajay 27-05-23 (1).pdfDIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING IN INDIA Ajay 27-05-23 (1).pdf
DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING IN INDIA Ajay 27-05-23 (1).pdf
 
AMAN SRIVASTAVA BRP REPORT.pdf
AMAN SRIVASTAVA BRP REPORT.pdfAMAN SRIVASTAVA BRP REPORT.pdf
AMAN SRIVASTAVA BRP REPORT.pdf
 
MUKESH MAURYA BRP REPORT.pdf
MUKESH MAURYA BRP REPORT.pdfMUKESH MAURYA BRP REPORT.pdf
MUKESH MAURYA BRP REPORT.pdf
 
SHIVANGNA RATHOUR BRP REPORT.pdf
SHIVANGNA RATHOUR BRP REPORT.pdfSHIVANGNA RATHOUR BRP REPORT.pdf
SHIVANGNA RATHOUR BRP REPORT.pdf
 
AMAR KUMAR REPORT FINAL.pdf
AMAR KUMAR REPORT FINAL.pdfAMAR KUMAR REPORT FINAL.pdf
AMAR KUMAR REPORT FINAL.pdf
 
MD ATHUAL 25-05-2023 NEW.pdf
MD ATHUAL 25-05-2023 NEW.pdfMD ATHUAL 25-05-2023 NEW.pdf
MD ATHUAL 25-05-2023 NEW.pdf
 
A STUDY ON RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION PROCESS nandini gupta new updated (1).pdf
A STUDY ON RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION PROCESS nandini gupta new updated (1).pdfA STUDY ON RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION PROCESS nandini gupta new updated (1).pdf
A STUDY ON RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION PROCESS nandini gupta new updated (1).pdf
 
A STUDY OF SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING akhil report (1).pdf
A STUDY OF SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING akhil report (1).pdfA STUDY OF SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING akhil report (1).pdf
A STUDY OF SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING akhil report (1).pdf
 
UNDERSTAND THE ECOSYSTEM IN DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING VICKY KUMAR.pdf
UNDERSTAND THE ECOSYSTEM IN DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING VICKY KUMAR.pdfUNDERSTAND THE ECOSYSTEM IN DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING VICKY KUMAR.pdf
UNDERSTAND THE ECOSYSTEM IN DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING VICKY KUMAR.pdf
 
ANAND HONDA REPORT.pdf
ANAND HONDA REPORT.pdfANAND HONDA REPORT.pdf
ANAND HONDA REPORT.pdf
 
Business research report
Business research reportBusiness research report
Business research report
 
Business research report
Business research reportBusiness research report
Business research report
 

Recently uploaded

Fritschi Collection 2022/23 EN gama completa
Fritschi Collection 2022/23 EN gama completaFritschi Collection 2022/23 EN gama completa
Fritschi Collection 2022/23 EN gama completaEsteller
 
Social Media Content Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy at ...
Social Media Content Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy at ...Social Media Content Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy at ...
Social Media Content Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy at ...Valters Lauzums
 
Digital Marketing complete introduction.
Digital Marketing complete introduction.Digital Marketing complete introduction.
Digital Marketing complete introduction.Kashish Bindra
 
Gen Z and Millennial Debit Card Use Survey.pdf
Gen Z and Millennial Debit Card Use Survey.pdfGen Z and Millennial Debit Card Use Survey.pdf
Gen Z and Millennial Debit Card Use Survey.pdfMedia Logic
 
20 Top Social Media Tips for Peer Specialists
20 Top Social Media Tips for Peer Specialists20 Top Social Media Tips for Peer Specialists
20 Top Social Media Tips for Peer Specialistsmlicam615
 
Lesotho-Botswana Water Project Brand Manual developed with new logo
Lesotho-Botswana Water Project Brand Manual developed with  new logoLesotho-Botswana Water Project Brand Manual developed with  new logo
Lesotho-Botswana Water Project Brand Manual developed with new logonelaohaimbodi
 
AMAZON Copywriting Portfolio by Cielo Evangelista
AMAZON Copywriting Portfolio by Cielo EvangelistaAMAZON Copywriting Portfolio by Cielo Evangelista
AMAZON Copywriting Portfolio by Cielo Evangelistacrevangelista
 
Krisantec Digital Marketing Services.pdf
Krisantec Digital Marketing Services.pdfKrisantec Digital Marketing Services.pdf
Krisantec Digital Marketing Services.pdfkrisantecsolutions
 
2024 WTF - what's working in mobile user acquisition
2024 WTF - what's working in mobile user acquisition2024 WTF - what's working in mobile user acquisition
2024 WTF - what's working in mobile user acquisitionJohn Koetsier
 
Content Marketing: How To Find The True Value Of Your Marketing Funnel
Content Marketing: How To Find The True Value Of Your Marketing FunnelContent Marketing: How To Find The True Value Of Your Marketing Funnel
Content Marketing: How To Find The True Value Of Your Marketing FunnelSearch Engine Journal
 
TAM Sports IPL 17 Advertising Report- M01 - M23
TAM Sports IPL 17 Advertising Report- M01 - M23TAM Sports IPL 17 Advertising Report- M01 - M23
TAM Sports IPL 17 Advertising Report- M01 - M23Social Samosa
 
Catálogo HYD 2024 gama completa Hydrapak
Catálogo HYD 2024 gama completa HydrapakCatálogo HYD 2024 gama completa Hydrapak
Catálogo HYD 2024 gama completa HydrapakEsteller
 
5 TH SEM BBA DIGITAL MARKETING NOTES.docx
5 TH SEM BBA DIGITAL MARKETING NOTES.docx5 TH SEM BBA DIGITAL MARKETING NOTES.docx
5 TH SEM BBA DIGITAL MARKETING NOTES.docxmskarthik1435
 
Francesco d’Angela, Service Designer di @HintoGroup- “Oltre la Frontiera Crea...
Francesco d’Angela, Service Designer di @HintoGroup- “Oltre la Frontiera Crea...Francesco d’Angela, Service Designer di @HintoGroup- “Oltre la Frontiera Crea...
Francesco d’Angela, Service Designer di @HintoGroup- “Oltre la Frontiera Crea...Associazione Digital Days
 
Social Media Marketing Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy a...
Social Media Marketing Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy a...Social Media Marketing Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy a...
Social Media Marketing Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy a...Valters Lauzums
 
Master the art of Social Selling to increase sales by fostering relationships...
Master the art of Social Selling to increase sales by fostering relationships...Master the art of Social Selling to increase sales by fostering relationships...
Master the art of Social Selling to increase sales by fostering relationships...VereigenMedia1
 
The Fall of Social Media Marketing :- Global brand magazine
The Fall of Social Media Marketing :- Global brand magazineThe Fall of Social Media Marketing :- Global brand magazine
The Fall of Social Media Marketing :- Global brand magazineglobalbrandmagazines1
 
Richard van der Velde, Technical Support Lead for Cookiebot @CMP – “Artificia...
Richard van der Velde, Technical Support Lead for Cookiebot @CMP – “Artificia...Richard van der Velde, Technical Support Lead for Cookiebot @CMP – “Artificia...
Richard van der Velde, Technical Support Lead for Cookiebot @CMP – “Artificia...Associazione Digital Days
 
Make Your Message Go Viral with Nugget Global's Press Release Distribution Se...
Make Your Message Go Viral with Nugget Global's Press Release Distribution Se...Make Your Message Go Viral with Nugget Global's Press Release Distribution Se...
Make Your Message Go Viral with Nugget Global's Press Release Distribution Se...Nugget Global
 
Llanai Buyer Persona & Segmentation Strategy
Llanai Buyer Persona & Segmentation StrategyLlanai Buyer Persona & Segmentation Strategy
Llanai Buyer Persona & Segmentation StrategyMarianna Nakou
 

Recently uploaded (20)

Fritschi Collection 2022/23 EN gama completa
Fritschi Collection 2022/23 EN gama completaFritschi Collection 2022/23 EN gama completa
Fritschi Collection 2022/23 EN gama completa
 
Social Media Content Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy at ...
Social Media Content Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy at ...Social Media Content Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy at ...
Social Media Content Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy at ...
 
Digital Marketing complete introduction.
Digital Marketing complete introduction.Digital Marketing complete introduction.
Digital Marketing complete introduction.
 
Gen Z and Millennial Debit Card Use Survey.pdf
Gen Z and Millennial Debit Card Use Survey.pdfGen Z and Millennial Debit Card Use Survey.pdf
Gen Z and Millennial Debit Card Use Survey.pdf
 
20 Top Social Media Tips for Peer Specialists
20 Top Social Media Tips for Peer Specialists20 Top Social Media Tips for Peer Specialists
20 Top Social Media Tips for Peer Specialists
 
Lesotho-Botswana Water Project Brand Manual developed with new logo
Lesotho-Botswana Water Project Brand Manual developed with  new logoLesotho-Botswana Water Project Brand Manual developed with  new logo
Lesotho-Botswana Water Project Brand Manual developed with new logo
 
AMAZON Copywriting Portfolio by Cielo Evangelista
AMAZON Copywriting Portfolio by Cielo EvangelistaAMAZON Copywriting Portfolio by Cielo Evangelista
AMAZON Copywriting Portfolio by Cielo Evangelista
 
Krisantec Digital Marketing Services.pdf
Krisantec Digital Marketing Services.pdfKrisantec Digital Marketing Services.pdf
Krisantec Digital Marketing Services.pdf
 
2024 WTF - what's working in mobile user acquisition
2024 WTF - what's working in mobile user acquisition2024 WTF - what's working in mobile user acquisition
2024 WTF - what's working in mobile user acquisition
 
Content Marketing: How To Find The True Value Of Your Marketing Funnel
Content Marketing: How To Find The True Value Of Your Marketing FunnelContent Marketing: How To Find The True Value Of Your Marketing Funnel
Content Marketing: How To Find The True Value Of Your Marketing Funnel
 
TAM Sports IPL 17 Advertising Report- M01 - M23
TAM Sports IPL 17 Advertising Report- M01 - M23TAM Sports IPL 17 Advertising Report- M01 - M23
TAM Sports IPL 17 Advertising Report- M01 - M23
 
Catálogo HYD 2024 gama completa Hydrapak
Catálogo HYD 2024 gama completa HydrapakCatálogo HYD 2024 gama completa Hydrapak
Catálogo HYD 2024 gama completa Hydrapak
 
5 TH SEM BBA DIGITAL MARKETING NOTES.docx
5 TH SEM BBA DIGITAL MARKETING NOTES.docx5 TH SEM BBA DIGITAL MARKETING NOTES.docx
5 TH SEM BBA DIGITAL MARKETING NOTES.docx
 
Francesco d’Angela, Service Designer di @HintoGroup- “Oltre la Frontiera Crea...
Francesco d’Angela, Service Designer di @HintoGroup- “Oltre la Frontiera Crea...Francesco d’Angela, Service Designer di @HintoGroup- “Oltre la Frontiera Crea...
Francesco d’Angela, Service Designer di @HintoGroup- “Oltre la Frontiera Crea...
 
Social Media Marketing Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy a...
Social Media Marketing Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy a...Social Media Marketing Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy a...
Social Media Marketing Lecture for Advanced Digital & Social Media Strategy a...
 
Master the art of Social Selling to increase sales by fostering relationships...
Master the art of Social Selling to increase sales by fostering relationships...Master the art of Social Selling to increase sales by fostering relationships...
Master the art of Social Selling to increase sales by fostering relationships...
 
The Fall of Social Media Marketing :- Global brand magazine
The Fall of Social Media Marketing :- Global brand magazineThe Fall of Social Media Marketing :- Global brand magazine
The Fall of Social Media Marketing :- Global brand magazine
 
Richard van der Velde, Technical Support Lead for Cookiebot @CMP – “Artificia...
Richard van der Velde, Technical Support Lead for Cookiebot @CMP – “Artificia...Richard van der Velde, Technical Support Lead for Cookiebot @CMP – “Artificia...
Richard van der Velde, Technical Support Lead for Cookiebot @CMP – “Artificia...
 
Make Your Message Go Viral with Nugget Global's Press Release Distribution Se...
Make Your Message Go Viral with Nugget Global's Press Release Distribution Se...Make Your Message Go Viral with Nugget Global's Press Release Distribution Se...
Make Your Message Go Viral with Nugget Global's Press Release Distribution Se...
 
Llanai Buyer Persona & Segmentation Strategy
Llanai Buyer Persona & Segmentation StrategyLlanai Buyer Persona & Segmentation Strategy
Llanai Buyer Persona & Segmentation Strategy
 

Consumer Buying Behavior at Big Bazaar

  • 1. Research Project Report On A STUDY ON CONSUMER BUYING BEHAVIOR AND FACTORS EFFECTING THEIR BUYING BEHAVIOR Submitted for the partial fulfillment of the Award Of Master of Business Administration DEGREE (Session :2022- 2023) SUBMITTED BY MD IRSHAD 2102720700082 UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF DR PRAMOD SRIVASTAVA Department of Master of Business Administration GNIOT-MBA Institute, Greater Noida AFFILIATED TO DR. A.P.J. ABDUL KALAM TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY (FORMERLY UTTARPRADESH TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY), LUCKNOW
  • 2. PAGE 1 STUDENT DECLARATION I “MD IRSHAD” hereby declare that the work which is being presented in this report entitled “A STUDY ON CONSUMER BUYING BEHAVIOR AND FACTORS EFFECTING THEIR BUYING BEHAVIOR” is an authentic record of my own work carried out underthe supervision of Dr PRAMOD SRIVASTAVA. The matter embodied in this report has not been submitted by me for the award of any otherdegree/ Diploma/ Certificate. Department of MBA Name of Student: - MD IRSHAD Date:-26-05-23 .
  • 3. PAGE 2 CERTIFICATE This is to certify that the work which is being presented in this report entitled “A STUDY ON CONSUMER BUYING BEHAVIOR AND FACTORS EFFECTING THEIR BUYING BEHAVIOR” is an authentic record of the student carried out under my supervision. The statements made by the candidate are correct to the best of my knowledge. Dr.Raj Kamal Upadhyaya Name of Supervisor: Pramod Sir Head, Department of MBA Designation: PROFESSOR Date:-26-05-23 (Seal of the Department/ College)
  • 4. PAGE 3 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT It is my pleasure to be indebted to various people, who directly or indirectly contributed in the development of this work and who influenced my thinking, behavior, and acts during the course of study. I am thankful to Dr PRAMOD SRIVASTAVA SIR for his support, cooperation, and motivation provided to me during the training for constant inspiration, presence and blessings. I also extend my sincere appreciation to Dr PRAMOD SRIVASTAVA SIR. who provided his valuable suggestions and precious time inaccomplishing my project report. Lastly, I would like to thank the almighty, parents, Director and HOD of the institute for their moral support and my friends with whom I shared my day- to- day experience and received lots of suggestions that improved my quality of work. . MD IRSHAD
  • 5. PAGE 4 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT I wish to express my sincere gratitude towards BIG BAZAAR for giving me an opportunity to be a part of their esteemed organization for a period of 30 days for my Summer Internship Project under their guidance. Completing this task is never a one-man effort. It is always a result of inseparable contribution of a number of individuals in direct and indirect manner. I would like to express my sincere thanks to MISS SHIKHA SHARMA, HR Executive, Big Bazaar, Bokaro for sparing her valuable time, knowledge and technical know-how, including keen interest and guiding me at every stage of this project. Last but not the least, I thank all the employees at Big Bazaar for helping me throughout my project. Thank you. PRAN KUMAR MAHATO
  • 6. PAGE 5 TABLE OF CONTENTS S. NO. TOPIC PAGE NO. 1 INTRODUCTION  Objectives  Scopes  Importance 05 2 COMPANY PROFILE 09 3 LITERATURE REVIEW 13 4 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 26 5 ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION 30 6 RECOMMENDATIONS 47 7 CONCLUSION 49 8 LIMITATIONS 51 9 REFERENCES 53 10 ANNEXURE 55
  • 8. PAGE 7 INTRODUCTION As customer’s tastes and preferences are changing, the market scenario is also changing from time to time. Today’s market scenario is very different from that of the market scenario before 1990. There have been many factors responsible for the changing market scenario. It is the changing tastes and preference of customer which has bought in a change in the market. Income level of the people has changed; life styles and social class of people have completely changed now than that of old days. There has been a shift in the market demand in today’s world. Technology is one of the major factors which is responsible for this paradigm shift in the market. New generation people are no more dependent on haat market and far off departmental stores. Today we can see a new era in market with the opening up of many departmental stores, hyper market, shopper’s stop, malls, branded retail outlets and specialty stores. In today’s world shopping is not any more tiresome work rather it’s a pleasant outing phenomenon now. My study is based on a survey done on customers of a hypermarket named Big Bazaar. Big Bazaar is a new type of market which came into existence in India since 1994. It is a type of market where various kinds of products are available under one roof. My study is on determining the customer’s buying behavior and factors influencing their buying decision at Big Bazaar. My study will find out the areas where Big Bazaar lacks behind the customer’s expectations and determine what should be done to stands in the current market. This field survey will help in knowing the present customers tastes and preferences. It will help me in estimating the customer’s future needs, wants, demands and serving them better. *****
  • 9. PAGE 8 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY 1. To find out the buying behavior of the customers coming to Big Bazaar, Bokaro. 2. To find out the customers response towards various attributes of Big Bazaar. 3. To study the satisfaction level of customers in different attributes of Big Bazaar. ***** SCOPE OF STUDY The scope of this research is to identify the buying behavior of customers of Big Bazaar in Bokaro. This research is based on primary data only. Due to time constraint only limited number of persons contacted. This study only focuses buying behavior of customers in Bokaro. The study does not say anything about buying behavior of customer of other places. The scope of research is limited for Bokaro. It provides help to further the research for organized retail sector in Bokaro. It aim to understand the skill of the company in the area like technological advancement and competition in management. *****
  • 10. PAGE 9 IMPORTANCE OF STUDY The study shows customers buying pattern with Big Bazaar in Bokaro. Its provide guideline for further research in Bokaro for organized retail. Research says about customer buying behavior towards Big Bazaar in Bokaro. The study rate of customer satisfaction level with Big Bazaar for Bokaro. The research is also important to identify Market size, growth and Market Potential of Big Bazaar in Bokaro. The research shows future Scenario of Big Bazaar in current perspective. The study shows Opportunities and challenges for Big Bazaar respect of internal & external environment. Research say about main competitors in the field of organized retail sectors. The study provide guideline to further extension of Big Bazaar in Bokaro .The study provide help to know the customers satisfaction with Big Bazaar stores. *****
  • 12. PAGE 11 COMPANY PROFILE About the Company: Mr. Kishore Biyani, CEO, Future India‘s leading retailer that operates multiple retail formats in both the value and lifestyle segment of the Indian consumer market. Headquartered in Mumbai, the company operates over 16.33 million square feet. Of retail space, has over 1000 stores across 85 cities and 60 rural locations across the country and employs over 35000 people. The company‘s leading format include Pantaloons, a chain of fashion outlets, Big Bazaar, a uniquely Indian hypermarket chain, Food Bazaar, a supermarket chain, blends the look, touch and feel of Indian bazaars with aspects of modern retail like choice, convenience and quality. Central is a chain of seamless destination malls. Some of its other formats include Shoe Factory, Brand Factory, Blue Sky, Fashion Station, Mobile Bazaar and Star Sitara (Beauty clinic). The company also operates an online portal, Futurebazaar.com. A subsidiary company, Home Solutions Retail (India) Limited, operates Home Town, a large-format home solutions store, selling home furniture products and E-Zone focused on catering to the consumer electronics segment. Future Group understands the soul of Indian consumers. As one of India‘s retail pioneers with multiple retail formats, we connect a diverse and passionate community of Indian buyers, sellers and businesses. The collective impact on business is staggering: Around 220 million customers walk into our stores each year and choose products and a service supplied by over 30,000 small, medium and large entrepreneurs and manufacturers from across India and this number is set to grow. Group Vision: Future Group shall deliver Everything, Everywhere, Every time for Every Indian Consumer in the most profitable manner. Group Mission: We share the vision and belief that our customers and stakeholders shall be served only by creating and executing future scenarios in the consumption space leading to economic development.
  • 13. PAGE 12  We will be the trendsetters in evolving delivery formats, creating retail realty, making consumption affordable for all customer segments – for classes and for masses.  We shall infuse Indian brands with confidence and renewed ambition.  We shall be efficient, cost- conscious and committed to quality in whatever we do.  We shall ensure that our positive attitude, sincerity, humility and united determination shall be the driving force to make us successful Group Values:  Indianness: Confidence in ourselves.  Leadership: To be a leader, both in thought and business.  Respect & Humility: To respect every individual and be humble in our conduct.  Introspection: Leading to purposeful thinking.  Openness: To be open and receptive to new ideas, knowledge and information.  Valuing and Nurturing Relationships: To build long term relationships.  Simplicity & Positivity: Simplicity and positivity in our thought, business and action.  Adaptability: To be flexible and adaptable, to meet challenges.  Flow: To respect and understand the universal laws of nature KEY GROUP COMPANIES: Retail:  Future Value Retail Limited
  • 14. PAGE 13 Finance:  Future Generali Life Insurance Company Limited  Future Generali (India) Insurance Company Limited  Future Capital Holdings Limited  Future Ventures (India) Limited Services:  Future Supply Chains Limited  Future Human Development Limited Future Media (India) Limited  Future Corporate Resources Limited *****
  • 16. PAGE 15 Customer: The term “customer” is typically used to refer to one who regularly purchase from a particular store or company. The “consumer” more generally refers to anyone engaging in any of the activities (evaluating, acquiring, using or disposing of goods and services) used in the definition of consumer behaviour. Therefore, a “customer” is defined in terms of specific firm while consumer is not. Customers are value maximiser within the bounds of search costs, limited knowledge, mobility and income. The most commonly thought of consumer situation is that of an individual making a purchase with little or no influence of others. A consumer or buyer is one who determines personal wants, buys products and uses those products. The traditional viewpoint defines consumers strictly in terms of economic goods and services or one who consumes goods. The “customer is king” philosophy has become one of those marketing fads and fashions that have continued to trail the growth and expansion of the product economy. The term consumer is often used to describe two different kinds of consuming entities personal consumer and organisational consumer. Ultimate consumers are those individuals who purchases for the purpose of individual or household consumption. Organisational consumers are those who buy products and services in order to run their business. A customer is also called client, buyer, shopper or purchaser, usually used to refer to a current or potential buyer or user of the products of an individual or organisation called the supplier, seller, or vendor. This is typically through purchasing or renting goods or services. However, in certain contexts, the term customer also includes by extension anyone who uses or experiences the services of another. A customer may also be a viewer of the product or service that is being sold despite deciding not to buy them. The word customer is derived from “custom,” meaning “habit”; a customer is someone who frequently buy from a particular shop, who made it a habit to purchase goods or services rather than elsewhere and with whom the shopkeeper had to maintain a relationship to keep his or her “custom,” meaning expected purchases in the future. The slogans “the customer is king” or “the customer is god” or “the customer is always right” indicate the importance of customers to businesses - although the last expression is sometimes used ironically. The “consumer” more generally refers to anyone engaging in any of the activities used in our definition of consumer behaviour. Therefore, a customer is defined in terms of specific firm while consumer is not. The traditional viewpoint has defined the behaviour as:-
  • 17. PAGE 16 CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR AND BUYER BEHAVIOUR Consumer behaviour is seen to involve a complicated mental process as well as physical activity (purchase decision). Consumer behaviour is a decision process and physical activity individuals engage in when evaluating, acquiring, using or disposing of goods and services. Consumer Behaviour reflects the totality of consumer’s decisions with respect to the acquisition, consumption and disposition of goods, services, time and ideas by (human) decision making units. Buyer is the individual who actually makes the purchase transaction whereas user is the person most directly involved in the consumption or use of the purchased product. Buyer Behaviour particularly is the study of decision making units as they can buy for themselves or others. Thus, buying behaviour particularly involves collective response of buyers for selecting, evaluating, and deciding and post purchase behaviour. Buyer behaviour is the study of human response to services and the marketing of products and services. Buyer behaviour researches continuously investigate a broad range of human responses including human affective, cognitive and behavioural responses. The buying behaviour and purchase decisions are need to be studied thoroughly in order to understand, predict and analyse critical market variations of a particular product or service. The field of consumer behaviour is the broad study of individuals, groups or organisations and the process they use to select, secure and dispose of products, services, experiences or ideas to satisfy needs and the impacts that these processes have on the consumer and society. Consumer behaviour studies are based on the buying behaviour of final consumers-individuals and households who buy goods and services for themselves. The collective behaviour of consumers has a significant influence on quality and level of standard of living. Buyer Behaviour is broadly defined by various scholars and researchers as: 1. It’s the behaviour displayed by the consumers during the acquisition, use and disposition of products/services, time and ideas by decision making units. 2. It is the body of knowledge which studies various aspects of purchase and consumption of products and services by individuals with various social and psychological variables at play. 3. The process and activities people engage in when searching for, selecting, purchasing, using, evaluating and disposing of products and services so as to satisfy their needs and desires. The activities directly involved in obtaining, consuming and disposing off products and services, including the decision processes that precede and follow these actions.
  • 18. PAGE 17 CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR: AN EMERGING FIELD OF STUDY In the highly specialised study of “business management”, “business administration” or just “management” today, “marketing management” function plays a very critical role in business activities. This is because this functional area of management: (1) “Earns” the revenue and (2) “Works” in the close proximity with the public or persons outside the organisation. Controlling these two attributes to have the desired benefits are the most difficult part of the management, because none of these two are within the direct control of the marketers. This does not mean that the other functional areas are not useful, but they are not “directly” involved in the activities mentioned above. Marketing consists of an interaction between buyer and seller for the purpose of exchanging something valuable to the mutual benefit of both the parties to the transaction. One cannot appreciate this marketing process by observing only the seller, knowledge about consumer is a sound basis for marketing strategies and decisions. Markets are selected on the basis of consumer wants, location, characteristics and expenditure patterns. To ignore the customer can lead to disaster in a modern economy. Consumer behaviour has become an integral part of strategic market planning. It is also the basis of the approach to the concept of “Holistic Marketing”. The belief that ethics and corporate social responsibility should also be integral components of every marketing decision is embodied in a revised marketing concept – the societal marketing concept – which calls on marketers to fulfil the needs of their target markets in ways that improve society as a whole. Consumer or the “Customer” play a very critical role as these are the people who finally buy the goods and services of the organisation and the firm is always on the move to make them buy so as to earn revenue. It’s crucial from both the points of view as given below: From the customer’s point of view: Today, in the highly developed and technologically advanced society, the customers have a great deal of choices and options (often very close and competing) to decide on or compare; (1) They have the products of an extreme range of products attributes (the 1st P - Product). (2) They have a wide range of cost and payment choices (the 2nd P - Price).
  • 19. PAGE 18 (3) They can order them to be supplied to their door step or anywhere else (the 3rd P - Place) and (4) Finally they are bombarded with more communications from more channels of information than ever before with the invention of information technology (the 4th P - Promotion). From the marketer’s point of view: “The purpose of marketing is to sell more stuff to more people more often for more money in order to make more profit.” This is the basic principle of requirement for the marketers in earlier days where aggressive selling was the primary aim. It cannot be achieved by force, aggression or plain alluring. Customer today are more informed, more knowledgeable, more demanding, more discerning and above all there is no dearth of marketers to buy from. The marketers have to earn them or win them over. The global marketplace is a study of diversity among consumers, producers, marketers, retailers, advertising media, cultures, and customs and of course the individual or psychological behaviour. However, despite prevailing diversities, there also are many similarities. Consumer market is highly sensitive and driven by widely diversified culture in many countries. The study of consumer behaviour is also very important to the marketers because it enables them to understand and predict buying behaviour of consumers in the marketplace. It is concerned not only with what consumers buy, but also with why they buy it, when, where, how they buy it, how often they buy it and also how they enjoy the services. Consumer research is the methodology used to study consumer behaviour; it takes place at every phase of the buying process: before the purchase, during the purchase and after the purchase. Researches shows that two different buyers buying the same product may have done it for different reasons, paid different prices, used in different ways, have different emotional attachments towards the things and so on. The market strategies are reframed to achieve organisational objectives depending upon knowing, serving and influencing consumers. This suggests that the knowledge and information about consumers is critical for developing successful marketing strategies. The relationship between consumers and marketers, consumer behaviour and marketing strategy is instable to attain organisational objectives. Consumer behaviour is interdisciplinary approach based on concepts and theories about people that have been developed by behavioural scientists, philosophers and researchers in diverse disciplines such as psychology, sociology, social psychology, cultural anthropology and economics. The study of consumer behaviour also helps management to understand consumer’s needs so as to recognise the potential for the trend of development of change in consumer requirements and new technology and also to articulate the new thing in terms of the consumer’s needs so that it will be universally accepted in the market well.
  • 20. PAGE 19 BUYER ROLES For making strategic decisions the marketers have to identify the buyers who make the final buying decisions. It is truly a big task before the marketers to identify the target buyers of the particular service. (1) Influencer: Several people may be involved in a particular purchase decision, but all of them are not consumers. A person who has influence, whose views or advice is given weightage while taking the final decision. (2) Gatekeepers: Family members who control the flow of information about a product or service into the family. (3) Initiator: The person who is the first to suggest or think of the idea of purchasing a product or service. (4) Decider: The person who finally takes the decisions of whether to buy, what to buy, how to buy and from where to buy. (5) Buyer: The person who actually buy the product/service after making payments. (6) User: The person who actually uses or consumes the product or service. Personal Factors That Affect People’s Buying Behavior The Consumer’s Personality Personality describes a person’s disposition as other people see it. The following are the “Big Five” personality traits that psychologists discuss frequently: (1) Openness. How open you are to new experiences. (2) Conscientiousness. How diligent you are. (3) Extraversion. How outgoing or shy you are. (4) Agreeableness. How easy you are to get along with. (5) Neuroticism. How prone you are to negative mental state.
  • 21. PAGE 20 The Consumer’s Self Concept Marketers have had better luck linking people’s self-concept to their buying behavior. Your self-concept is how you see yourself—be it positive or negative. Your ideal self is how you would like to see yourself—whether it’s prettier, more popular or more eco-conscious. Marketing researchers believe people buy products to enhance how they feel about themselves—to get themselves closer to their ideal selves, in other words. The slogan “Be All That You Can Be,” which for years was used by the U.S. Army to recruit soldiers, is an attempt to appeal to the self-concept. Presumably, by joining the U.S. Army, you will become a better version of yourself, which will, in turn, improve your life. Many beauty products and cosmetic procedures are advertised in a way that’s supposed to appeal to the ideal selves people are searching for. All of us want products that improve our lives. The Consumer’s Gender Everyone knows that men and women buy different products. Physiologically speaking, they simply need different product—different underwear, shoes, toiletries, and a host of other products. Men and women also shop differently. One study by Resource Interactive, a technology research firm, found that when shopping online, men prefer sites with lots of pictures of products; women prefer to see products online in lifestyle context—say, a lamp in a living room. Women are also twice as likely as men to use viewing tools such as the zoom and rotate buttons and links that allow them to change the colour of products. In general, men have a different attitude about shopping than women do. The shopping differences between men and women seem to be changing, though. Many businesses today are taking greater pains to figure out “what men want.” Products such as face toners and body washes for men, such as the Axe brand, are a relatively new phenomenon. So are hair salons such as the Men’s Zone and Weldon Barber. Some advertising agencies specialize in advertising directed at men. Keep in mind that there are also many items targeted toward women that weren’t in the past, including products such as kayaks and mountain bikes.
  • 22. PAGE 21 The Consumer’s Age and Stage of Life You have probably noticed that the things you buy have changed as your age. When you were a child, the last thing you probably wanted as a gift was clothing. As you became a teen, however, cool clothes probably became a bigger priority. Companies understand that people buy different things based on their ages and life stages. Aging baby boomers are a huge market that companies are trying to tap. Ford and other car companies have created “aging suits” for young employees to wear when they’re designing automobiles. The suit simulates the restricted mobility and vision people experience as they get older. Car designers can then figure out how to configure the automobiles to better meet the needs of these consumers. Your chronological age, or actual age in years, is one thing. Your cognitive age, or how old you perceive yourself to be, is another. In other words, how old do you really feel? A person’s cognitive age affects the activities one engages in and sparks interests consistent with the person’s perceived age. Cognitive age is a significant predictor of consumer behaviours, including people’s dining out, watching television, going to bars and dance clubs, playing computer games, and shopping. How old people “feel” they are has important implications for marketing professionals. For example, companies have found that many “aged” consumers don’t take kindly to products that feature “old folks.” The consumers can’t identify with them because they see themselves as being younger. The Consumer’s Lifestyle Two consumers (say, you and your best friend) can be similar in age, personality, gender, and so on but still purchase very different products. To better understand consumers and connect with them, companies have begun looking more closely at consumers’ lifestyles. This often includes asking consumers to fill out extensive questionnaires or conducting in-depth interviews with them. The questionnaires go beyond asking people about the products they like, where they live, and what sex they are. Instead, researchers ask people what they do—that is, how they spend their time and what their priorities, values, and general outlooks on the world are. Where do they go other than work? Who do they like to talk to? What do they talk about?
  • 23. PAGE 22 The Consumer’s Decision-Making Process Stage 1. Need Recognition Stage 2. Search for Information Stage 3. Product Evaluation Stage 4. Product Choice and Purchase Stage 5. Post purchase Use and Evaluation Stage 6. Disposal of the Product Low-Involvement versus High-Involvement Buying Decisions: Consumers don’t necessarily go through all the buying stages when they’re considering purchasing product. You have probably thought about many products you want or need but never did much more than that. At other times, you’ve probably looked at dozens of products, compared them, and then decided not to purchase any one of them. At yet other times, you skip stages 1 through 3 and buy products on impulse. Purchasing a product with no planning or forethought is called impulse buying. Impulse buying brings up a concept called level of involvement—that is, how personally important or interested you are in consuming a product. Low- involvement products aren’t necessarily purchased on impulse, although they can be. Low-involvement products are, however, inexpensive and pose a low risk to the buyer if he/she makes a mistake by purchasing them. By contrast, high-involvement products carry a high risk to buyers if they fail, are complex, or have high price tags. A car, a house, and an insurance policy are examples. These items are not purchased often. Buyers don’t engage in routine response behaviour when purchasing high-involvement products. Instead, consumers engage in what’s called extended problem solving, where they spend a lot of time comparing the features of the products, prices, warrantees, and so forth. High-involvement products can cause buyers a great deal of post-purchase dissonance if they are unsure about their purchases. Companies that sell high-
  • 24. PAGE 23 involvement products are aware of that post-purchase dissonance can be a problem. Frequently, they try to offer consumers a lot of information about their products, including why they are superior to competing brands and how they won’t let the consumer down. Salespeople are typically utilized to do a lot of customer “hand-holding.” Limited problem solving falls somewhere in the middle. Consumers engage in limited problem solving when they already have some information about a good or service but continue to search for a bit more information. Situational Factors That Affect People’s Buying Behaviour The Consumer’s Physical Situation Have you ever been in a department store and couldn’t find your way out? No, you aren’t necessarily directionally challenged. Marketing professionals take physical factors such as a store’s design and layout into account when they are designing their facilities. Presumably, the longer you wander around a facility, the more you will spend. Grocery stores frequently place bread and milk products on the opposite ends of the stores because people often need both types of products. To buy both, they have to walk around an entire store, which of course, is loaded with other items they might see and purchase. Physical factors like these—the ones over which firms have control—are called atmospherics. In addition to store locations, they include the music played at stores, the lighting, temperature, and even the smells you experience. Perhaps you’ve visited the office of an apartment complex and noticed how great it looked and even smelled. It’s no coincidence. The managers of the complex were trying to get you to stay for a while and have a look at their facilities. Research shows that “strategic fragrancing” results in customers staying in stores longer, buying more, and leaving with better impression of the quality of stores’ services and products. Mirrors near hotel elevators are another example Hotel operators have found that when people are busy looking at themselves in the mirrors, they don’t feel like they are waiting as long for their elevators. The Consumer’s Social Situation The social situation you’re in can significantly affect what you will buy, how much of it, and when. Perhaps you have seen Girl Scouts selling cookies outside grocery stores and other retail establishments and purchased nothing from them. But what if your neighbour’s daughter is selling the cookies? Are you going to turn her down, or be a friendly neighbour and buy a box (or two)?
  • 25. PAGE 24 Companies like Avon and Tupperware that sell their products at parties understand that the social situation you’re in makes a difference. The Consumer’s Time Situation The time of day, the time of year, and how much time consumers feel like they have to shop also affects what they buy. Researchers have even discovered whether someone is a “morning person” or “evening person” affects shopping patterns. Seven-Eleven Japan is a company that’s extremely in tune to physical factors such as time and how it affects buyers. The company’s point-of-sale systems at its checkout counters monitor what is selling well and when, and stores are restocked with those items immediately—sometimes via motorcycle deliveries that zip in and out of traffic along Japan’s crowded streets. The goal is to get the products on the shelves when and where consumers want them. Seven-Eleven Japan also knows that, like Americans, its customers are “time starved.” Shoppers can pay their utility bills, local taxes, and insurance or pension premiums at Seven-Eleven Japan stores, and even make photocopies. The Consumer’s Mood People’s moods temporarily affect their spending patterns. Some people enjoy shopping. It’s entertaining for them. At the extreme are compulsive spenders who get a temporary “high” from spending. A sour mood can spoil a consumer’s desire to shop. To get buyers in the shopping mood, companies resorted to different measures. The upscale retailer Neiman Marcus began introducing more mid-priced brands. By studying customer’s loyalty cards, the French hypermarket Carrefour hoped to find ways to get its customers to purchase non-food items that have higher profit margins. *****
  • 26. PAGE 25 BUYING BEHAVIOUR OF CONSUMERS There are 4 major types of buying behaviors based on the consumer’s involvement as well as differences in related brands. 1. Complex buying behaviour 2. Variety seeking behaviour 3. Dissonance reducing buying behaviour 4. Habitual buying behaviour 1. Complex buying behaviour: In this type of buying behaviour consumers are highly involved as well as there is a significant differences between brands. For example: Car, Flat, Plot etc. 2. Variety seeking behaviour: In this type of buying behaviour there is a low involvement but there is a significant differences between brands, the consumer can himself make the purchase decision. For example: Perfumes, incense sticks etc. COMPLEX BUYING BEHAVIOR VARIETY SEEKING BEHAVIOR TYPES OF BUYING BEHAVIOR DISSONANCE REDUCING BUYING BEHAVIOR HABITUAL BUYING BEHAVIOR
  • 27. PAGE 26 3. Dissonance reducing buying behaviour: In this type of buying behaviour consumers are highly involved due to very few differences between brands. The consumer only cannot make the purchase decision alone. For example: Gold jewelleries, Furniture, durables etc. 4. Habitual buying behaviour: In this type consumers are less involved in making the purchase decision because the daily use products are considered. For example: Toothpaste, detergent, Hair oil etc. *****
  • 29. PAGE 28 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Research is a systematic method of finding solutions to problems. It is essentially an investigation, a recording and an analysis of evidence for the purpose of gaining knowledge. According to Clifford woody, “research comprises of defining and redefining problem, formulating hypothesis or suggested solutions, collecting, organizing and evaluating data, reaching conclusions, testing conclusions to determine whether they fit the formulated hypothesis”. RESEARCH DESIGN: According to this study investigation was conducted for some definite purpose with the help of a structural & personal Interview and Questionnaire to gather primary information as much as possible. My study deals with Descriptive Research Design. Descriptive research, also known as statistical research, describes data and characteristics about the population or phenomenon being studied. Descriptive research answers the questions who, what, where, when and how. SAMPLING DESIGN: Sampling Frame: The respondents are the customers from Big Bazaar, Bokaro Steel City. Sampling Method: A sample design is a finite plan for obtaining a sample from a given population. Convenience sampling is used for this study. Sample Size: Number of the sampling units selected from the population is called the size of the sample. Sample of 100 respondents were obtained. Sampling Procedure: The procedure adopted in the present study is non- probability convenience sampling.
  • 30. PAGE 29 METHODS OF DATA COLLECTION: The data was collected through Primary sources only. QUESTIONNAIRE DESIGN: A well-defined questionnaire that is used effectively can gather information on both overall performance of the test system as well as information on specific components of the system. A defeated questionnaire was carefully prepared and specially numbered. The questions were arranged in proper order, in accordance with the relevance. Pros of questionnaire:  It can be used as a method in its own right or as a basis for interviewing or a telephonic survey.  It can be posted, e-mailed or faxed.  It can cover a large number of people or organizations.  It has wide geographic coverage.  It is relatively cheap.  No prior arrangements are needed.  It avoids embarrassment on the part of the respondent.  Respondent can consider responses.  Possible anonymity of respondent.  No interviewer bias. Cons of questionnaire:  Design problems.  Questions have to be relatively simple.  Historically low response rate (although inducements may help).  Time delay whilst waiting for responses to be returned.  Require a return deadline.  Assumes no literacy problems.  No control over who completes it.  Problems with incomplete questionnaires.  Replies not spontaneous and independent of each other.  Respondent can read all questions beforehand and then decide whether to complete or not. For example, perhaps because it is too long, too complex, uninteresting, or too personal.
  • 31. PAGE 30 Nature of Questions Asked: The questionnaire consists of closed ended questions and rating method. Presentation of Data: The data are presented through graphs, charts and tables. DATA ANALYSIS Data analysis is done through Statistical Tools:  Pie Charts.  Bar Charts.  Horizontal Bar Charts. Procedure for Analysis:  Administering questionnaire to all the customers visiting Big Bazaar, Bokaro.  Analyse the rating and responses of the customers using graphs and evaluating the positivity of responses. LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY: The limitations of the study are the following: 1. The data was collected through questionnaire. The response from the respondents may not be accurate. 2. The sample taken for the study was only 100 and from only one store so the results drawn may not be accurate. 3. Another difficulty was very limited time-span of the project. 4. Lack of experience of Researcher. *****
  • 33. PAGE 32 AGE GROUP 70 60 63% 50 40 30 17% 20 17% 3% 10 0 TEENAGERS YOUTHS MID AGED OLD AGED DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS ANALYSIS BASED ON QUESTIONS ASKED. TABLE 1: What is your age? S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. TEENAGERS 17 17% 2. YOUTHS 63 63% 3. MID AGED 17 17% 4. OLD AGED 03 03% INTERPRETATION: Out of all the customers interviewed, the above graph shows that the footfall at Big Bazaar, Bokaro constitutes 63% of youths(20 to 35 years), 17% of both teenagers as well as mid aged(36 to 60 years) and 3% of the customers are of old ages(above 60 years).
  • 34. PAGE 33 QUALIFICATION DOCTORATE POST GRADUATE 19% 1% MATRICULATION 15% INTERMEDIATE 16% GRADUATION 49% TABLE 2: What is your qualification? S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. MATRICULATE 15 15% 2. INTERMEDIATE 16 16% 3. GRADUATE 49 49% 4. POST GRADUATE 19 19% 5. DOCTORATE 01 01% INTERPRETATION: Among all the customers interviewed 49% of them were found to have bachelor degree, 19% of the customers had completed their master’s degree, 15% of the customers were matriculate and 16% out of the customers were intermediate.
  • 35. PAGE 34 HOUSEWIFE 3% OCCUPATION BUSINESSMEN 11% EMPLOYEE 41% STUDENT 42% RETIRED 3% EMPLOYEE RETIRED STUDENT HOUSEWIFE BUSINESSMEN TABLE 3: What is your profession? S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. EMPLOYEE 41 41% 2. BUSINESSMEN 11 11% 3. HOUSE-WIFE 03 03% 4. STUDENT 42 42% 5. RETIRED 03 03% INTERPRETATION: Coming to the occupation of the customers interviewed, most of the customers visiting Big Bazaar are students (42%) and employees (41%). 11% customers are businessmen, 3% of the customers are found to be housewives and retired personnel.
  • 36. PAGE 35 INCOME CHART 60 56% 50 40 30 20 19% 13% 12% 10 0 LESS THAN ₹10K 10K-₹30K ₹30K-₹50K ABOVE ₹50K TABLE 4: What is your monthly income? S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. LESS THAN ₹10000 56 56% 2. ₹10000 TO ₹30000 13 13% 3. ₹30000 TO ₹50000 19 19% 4. ABOVE ₹50000 12 12% INTERPRETATION: The above chart shows that 56% of the interviewed customers are found to have a monthly income of less than ₹10,000 (includes students also, their pocket money is also considered as income as they tend to spend that money while making transactions at Big Bazaar). 13% of the customers have an income of ₹10K to ₹30K, 19% of the customers have an income between ₹30K to ₹50K and 12% of the customers were found to have an income more than ₹50,000.
  • 37. PAGE 36 60 53% 50 40 37% 30 20 12% 10 8% 0 FAMILY SPOUSE FRIENDS ALONE TABLE 5: With whom do you like to go shopping? S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. FAMILY 53 53% 2. SPOUSE 08 08% 3. FRIENDS 37 37% 4. ALONE 12 12% INTERPRETATION: The above bar chart shows that 53% of the customers like to visit Big Bazaar with their family and 8% customers like to visit with their spouse. 37% of the customers have an interest in visiting with their friends whereas 12% of the customers find it comfortable in visiting alone.
  • 38. PAGE 37 FREQUENCY UNPLANNED BASIS 22% QUARTERLY 8% MONTHLY 40% WEEKLY 30% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 TABLE 6: How frequently do you visit Big Bazaar? S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. WEEKLY 22 22% 2. MONTHLY 08 08% 3. QUARTERLY 40 40% 4. UNPLANNED BASIS 30 30% INTERPRETATION: When the customers were asked about their visiting frequency, it was found that 30% of the customers visit weekly, 40% visit monthly, 8% of them visit quarterly and 22% are found to visit on an unplanned basis.
  • 39. PAGE 38 PURCHASE AREA 60 55% 50 40 29% 30 23% 20 10 07% FOOD ITEMS ELECTRONICS FASHION OTHERS TABLE 7: What kind of products you usually purchase at Big Bazaar? S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. FOOD ITEMS 29 29% 2. ELECTRONICS 07 07% 3. FASHION 55 55% 4. OTHERS 23 23% INTERPRETATION: Out of the total customers interviewed, 55% of the customers are interested in buying fashion apparels from Big Bazaar, whereas 29% customers are interested in buying food items and least were interested in buying electronic items. 23% of the customers were found to be interested in items other than food, electronics, and fashion products. They might have interested in buying other products available in the store such as soap, shampoo, toothpaste, perfumes etc.
  • 40. PAGE 39 35% 34% 31% TABLE 8: On which days do you prefer to visit Big Bazaar? S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. WEEKENDS 37 34% 2. WEEK DAYS 34 31% 3. BIG OFFER DAYS 38 35% INTERPRETATION: When the customers were asked about their preferred visiting days, it was found that 38% of the customers visit on BIG OFFER DAYS, 37% visit on weekends, 34% of them visit on week days. WEEKENDS WEEK DAYS BIG OFFER DAYS
  • 41. PAGE 40 TABLE 9: On which time do you prefer to visit Big Bazaar? S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. FORENOON 02 02% 2. AFTERNOON 34 34% 3. NOT FIXED 63 63% INTERPRETATION: When the customers were asked about their visiting time, it was found that 34% of the customers visit in the afternoon, 2% visit in morning, 63% of them have no fixed time of visiting Big Bazaar. 2% 34% 63% FORENOON AFTERNOON NOT FIXED
  • 42. PAGE 41 DEPENDS ON CATEGORY 35% YES 25% NO 40% TABLE 10: Do you come with a planned list of items while visiting Big Bazaar? S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. YES 25 25% 2. NO 40 40% 3. DEPENDS ON CATEGORY 35 35% INTERPRETATION: The above pie-chart shows that 40% of the customers do not visit with a planned list of items to purchase at Big Bazaar, 25% of the customers mentioned that they visit with a planned list and 35% said that their visit is unplanned and their purchase depends on the products available in different sections.
  • 43. PAGE 42 PIE-CHARTS BASED ON ATTRIBUTES RATED BY THE CUSTOMERS. TABLE 11: PRICE S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. POOR 04 04% 2. AVERAGE 51 51% 3. GOOD 40 40% 4. EXCELLENT 05 05% INTERPRETATIONS: Customers were asked to rate the various attributes of Big Bazaar such as Price of the products available. 51% of the total interviewed customers rated the prices to be average, 40% customers rated the prices good, 5% customers rated excellent whereas 4% customers found the prices to be poor. 5% 4% 40% 51% POOR AVERAGE GOOD EXCELLENT
  • 44. PAGE 43 TABLE 12: QUALITY S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. POOR 03 03% 2. AVERAGE 25 25% 3. GOOD 55 55% 4. EXCELLENT 17 17% INTERPRETATIONS: Customers were asked to rate the quality of products available at Big Bazaar. 55% of the customers rated the quality of product as good, 17% of them rated quality of products as excellent, 25% customers rated the quality as average whereas 3% of the customers rated quality as poor. POOR AVERAGE GOOD EXCELLENT 3% 17% 25% 55%
  • 45. PAGE 44 TABLE 13: ARRANGEMENTS S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. POOR 02 02% 2. AVERAGE 17 17% 3. GOOD 53 53% 4. EXCELLENT 28 28% INTERPRETATIONS: Customers were asked to rate the arrangement of the products available at Big Bazaar. 53% of the customers rated the arrangement of products as good, 17% of them rated the arrangement of products as good, 28% customers rated the arrangement as excellent whereas 2% of the customers rated arrangements as poor. 2% 17% 28% 53% POOR AVERAGE GOOD EXCELLENT
  • 46. PAGE 45 12% 3% 34% 51% TABLE 14: DISCOUNT/OFFERS S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. POOR 03 03% 2. AVERAGE 34 34% 3. GOOD 51 51% 4. EXCELLENT 12 12% INTERPRETATIONS: Customers were asked to rate the discounts/offers on products available at Big Bazaar. 51% of the customers rated discounts/offers on products as good, 34% of them rated discounts/offers on products as average, 12% customers rated the discounts/offers as excellent whereas 3% of the customers rated discounts/offers on products as poor. It can be said that customers are satisfied with the discounts/offers on products available at Big Bazaar. POOR AVERAGE GOOD EXCELLENT
  • 47. PAGE 46 13% 15% 25% 47% TABLE 15: BILLING S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. POOR 15 15% 2. AVERAGE 25 25% 3. GOOD 47 47% 4. EXCELLENT 13 13% INTERPRETATIONS: Customers were asked to rate the billing process at Big Bazaar. 47% of the customers rated billing process as good, 25% of them rated billing process as average, and 13% customers rated the billing process as excellent whereas 15% of the customers rated billing process as poor. POOR AVERAGE GOOD EXCELLENT
  • 48. PAGE 47 TABLE 16: PRODUCT AVAILABILITY S. No. PARTICULARS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE 1. POOR 03 03% 2. AVERAGE 29 29% 3. GOOD 48 48% 4. EXCELLENT 20 20% INTERPRETATIONS: Customers were asked to rate the product availability at Big Bazaar. 48% of the customers rated product availability as good, 29% of them rated product availability as average, and 20% customers rated the product availability as excellent whereas 3% of the customers rated product availability as poor. 3% 20% 29% 48% POOR AVERAGE GOOD EXCELLENT
  • 50. PAGE 49 RECOMMENDATIONS  Customers do come unplanned and their purchase decision depends upon product category, attractive display and employee’s efforts may gain sales.  Customers are found to have a keen interest in visiting unplanned and mostly during evening at Big Bazaar, employees should stay active during this time to gain sales.  During the forenoon Big Bazaar should provide some offers to its customers so that customers would be encouraged to visit Big Bazaar.  Big Bazaar, Bokaro needs to boost the sales in its electronics section through various means such as visual merchandising, live demo and attractive offers. The study points towards low interest of customers towards this section.  Price of the products should be more affordable, 51% customers have rated price as average.  Quality has been rated good but there is always a chance of enhancement in quality.  Arrangements also has been rated good by 53% customers, timely change in arrangements will break the monotony of the store but it may make it difficult for the customers to find the product.  15% customers has rated billing process as poor, appropriate steps should be taken to lessen such experiences of the customers.  There should be different billing counters for different customers. Cash counter and Card payment counter should be placed differently in order to reduce the rush and save the customer’s time. This will be a kind of motivator for the customers of Big Bazaar for making cashless payments. *****
  • 52. PAGE 51 CONCLUSION Big bazaar is a major shopping complex for today’s customers. It is a place where customers find variety of products at a reasonable price. Big bazaar has a good reputation of itself in the market. It has positioned itself in the market as a discounted store. It holds a huge customer base. The majority of customers belong to middle class family. The teenagers and youth generation also likes shopping and moving around big bazaar. Volume sales always take place in big bazaar. Impulse buying behavior of customers comes in to play most of the times in big bazaar. Big bazaar is a hypermarket as it provides various kinds of goods like apparels, grocery, stationary, food items, electronic items, leather items, watches, crockery, decorative items, sport items, chocolates and many more. It competes with all the specialty stores of different products which provide goods at a discounted rate throughout the year. It seemed from the study that the customers are quite satisfied with Big Bazaar. Big bazaar is a hypermarket store where varieties of products are being sold on different product category. It has emerged as a hub of shopping specially for middle class people. Different types of products starting from a baby food to large home appliances all available under one roof. At Bokaro it is the middle class people who mostly do shopping from Big Bazaar. Even most of the people do their monthly shopping from Big Bazaar. People not only visit Big Bazaar to do shopping but also visit for outing purpose as it provides a very nice ambience to its customers. As people go to malls they just tend to move around Big Bazaar whether it is for shopping purpose or for outing purpose. Grocery, apparels and food items are the products which are demanded most by the customers of Bokaro at Big Bazaar. As it is surveyed it seems that the biggest competitors of Big Bazaar are the kirana stores, discounted specialty stores like Vishal mega mart, The Tata Groups (Croma), Reliance Retail, & Sabka Bazaar but all the above mentioned stores are not present in Bokaro. Advantage to Big Bazaar is that it has been strategically located at the center point of a strategically developed sectors of Bokaro Steel City, being in the center makes it affordable for the SAIL employees living in the different sectors to purchase their monthly ration from Big Bazaar at higher discounts compared to general stores. *****
  • 54. PAGE 53 LIMITATIONS  Customers were reluctant to answer the questionnaire.  Due to less time only 100 customer’s responses were obtained and recorded.  Females were highly reluctant in filling the questionnaire.  The data obtained are based on customers of Big Bazaar, Bokaro only.  Less time in hands of the customers may have led to inappropriate entry.  Student’s monthly income has been considered as less than ₹10,000.  Customers had more than one option to choose form and tick.  Customer’s literacy level may have affected the study. *****
  • 56. PAGE 55 REFERENCES  Schiffman Lenon G. & Kanuk Leslie Lazar (2006). Consumer Behaviour. Prentice Hall of India.  Kotler, Philip. (2002). Marketing Management. Prentice Hall of India.  Loudon, David L. & Bitta Albert J. Della., (2004). Consumer Behaviour. Second edition. Mc-Grawhill.  Naresh K. Malhotra (2010). Marketing Research, 6th Edition, Pearson Publications. *****
  • 57. PAGE 56 PART: I ANNEXURE QUESTIONNAIRE NAME: AGE: Years GENDER: MALE: FEMALE: QUALIFICATION: 10th : 12th : Graduate: Post Graduate: OCCUPATION: Employee: Businessmen: Student: MARITAL STATUS: SINGLE MARRIED PART: II 1) What is your monthly income? A) Less than 10000 C) 10000 – 30000 B) 30000 – 50000 D) Above 50000 2) With whom do you like to go shopping? A) Family B) Friends C) Spouse D) Others 3) How frequently do you visit Big Bazaar? A) Weekly B) Monthly C) Quarterly D) Unplanned basis 4) What kind of products you usually purchase at Big Bazaar? A) Foods B) Electronics C) Fashion D) Others 5) On which days do you prefer to visit Big Bazaar? A) Weekend B) Week Days C) Big Offer Days 6) In which time do you prefer to visit Big Bazaar? A) Forenoon B) Afternoon C) Not fixed 7) Do you come with a planned list of items while visiting Big Bazaar? A) YES B) NO C) Depends on category 8) Rate the following attributes of Big Bazaar. S.No. ATTRIBUTES POOR AVERAGE GOOD EXCELLENT 1. PRICE 2. QUALITY 3. ARRANGEMENT 4. DISCOUNT/ OFFERS 5. BILLING 6. PRODUCT AVAILABILITY
  • 58. PAGE 57 THANKS FOR YOUR RESPONSE.