Historic District Boundaries10 Factors in Establishing Boundary Lines                                      Photo courtesy ...
Photo courtesy of Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the BPL, Flickr1. Take into account historic boundaries.Look at an ori...
2. Analyze an architecturalsurvey.Think about the visual character of yourcommunity as you look at the style of itsbuildin...
3. Use physical features aslines.Look for already existing elementslike railroads, expressways, andmajor highways that can...
4. Incorporate official lines.Don’t forget about the legally established boundary lines of yourtown. And streets, local ri...
5. Consider the politics.It’s important to consider theopinions of government officials,institutions, private citizens, an...
6. Also consider how residents will beaffected.Just as you must respect residents’ opinions on where to set theboundary li...
7. Hold meetings andworkshops.Offer residents, property owners, and localpreservationists a chance to participate in publi...
8. Conduct an historic survey.The comprehensive inventory of sites and structures produced fromthe survey will help better...
9. Include small, non-historic areas.Include these areas when they arecompletely surrounded by historicresources. This avo...
10. Be able to justify yourdecisions.Make sure you can adequately justify each ofthe boundary lines you propose for your h...
Ten on Tuesday features ten preservationtips each week. For more tips, visitblog.PreservationNation.org.
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[10 on Tuesday] 10 Factors in Establishing Local Historic District Boundary Lines

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Last month, we gave you a basic road map to help you navigate securing local historic district designation for your community. Today’s toolkit will focus on one of those steps: determining the edges of your district.

These elements are vital to understanding why one area is different than another and how each links us to our past. The boundaries you define transform the unique features of your community into a meaningful historic district.

This toolkit outlines 10 steps to get start on determining the most appropriate boundaries.

http://blog.preservationnation.org

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[10 on Tuesday] 10 Factors in Establishing Local Historic District Boundary Lines

  1. 1. Historic District Boundaries10 Factors in Establishing Boundary Lines Photo courtesy of Au Kirk, Flickr
  2. 2. Photo courtesy of Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the BPL, Flickr1. Take into account historic boundaries.Look at an original map of the area. Compare the boundariesof historic settlements, subdivisions, or other parts of theregion. Compare them to changes that have occurred overtime to help you draw more accurate lines.
  3. 3. 2. Analyze an architecturalsurvey.Think about the visual character of yourcommunity as you look at the style of itsbuildings, bridges, and other structures. Forexample, is there a large concentration ofVictorian-era homes next to a neighborhood of20th-century brick ranch houses?Also, look at the surrounding topography andtake into consideration any special gateways orentrances.Photo courtesy of Rojer, Flickr
  4. 4. 3. Use physical features aslines.Look for already existing elementslike railroads, expressways, andmajor highways that can serve asyour boundary lines.Other examples include: majorurban spaces; rivers, marshlands,and other natural features; majorchanges in land use; walls;embankments; and fence lines. Photo courtesy of compujeramey, Flickr
  5. 5. 4. Incorporate official lines.Don’t forget about the legally established boundary lines of yourtown. And streets, local rights-of-way, property lines, and otherpreviously drawn lines can be used to set boundaries. Photo courtesy _rockinfree, Flickr
  6. 6. 5. Consider the politics.It’s important to consider theopinions of government officials,institutions, private citizens, andproperty owners. Plus, they’ll haveideas and suggestions from adifferent point of view on where todraw your district borders. Photo courtesy of taberandrew, Flickr
  7. 7. 6. Also consider how residents will beaffected.Just as you must respect residents’ opinions on where to set theboundary lines of your district, you must also consider their ability topay for improvements, desire to conform to district regulations, andthe affordability of remaining in the area after historic districtdesignation.If your new lines negatively impact a majority of those who would beliving within them, then the benefits that come with historic districtdesignation will be lost.
  8. 8. 7. Hold meetings andworkshops.Offer residents, property owners, and localpreservationists a chance to participate in publicmeetings and pre-designation workshops.You can engage planning staff, consultants, orcommission members to help conduct theworkshops.Photo courtesy of Alhambra Source, Flickr
  9. 9. 8. Conduct an historic survey.The comprehensive inventory of sites and structures produced fromthe survey will help better inform your decisions on where to set theboundaries of your district. Photo courtesy of heatheronhertravels, Flickr
  10. 10. 9. Include small, non-historic areas.Include these areas when they arecompletely surrounded by historicresources. This avoids drawing“donut-holes” in the historic district.But make sure to clearly identify thenon-historic areas as such. Photo courtesy of Lisa Padilla, Flickr
  11. 11. 10. Be able to justify yourdecisions.Make sure you can adequately justify each ofthe boundary lines you propose for your historicdistrict. Also be ready to address anyirregularities, as well as outline notablegeography and areas of special significance.Photo courtesy of puroticorico, Flickr
  12. 12. Ten on Tuesday features ten preservationtips each week. For more tips, visitblog.PreservationNation.org.

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