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2015 NSF Small Business Innovation Research Conference-Showcase ABSTRACT BOOK

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2015 NSF Small Business Innovation Research Conference-Showcase ABSTRACT BOOK

  1. 1. INATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION 2015 NSF SBIR/STTR Phase II Grantee Conference Abstract Book ATLANTA MARRIOTT MARQUIS JUNE 1-4, 2015
  2. 2. IINATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION COVER IMAGE CREDITS (left to right) Navillum Nanotechnologies, LLC (Phase II: 1430979) has developed an innovative method for fabricating high quality Quantum Dots and other types of semiconducting nanocrystals at commercial scale using low temperatures. Credit: Navillum Nanotechnologies, LLC Empire Robotics, Inc. (Phase II: 1353624) has created the VERSABALL® , a spherical robotic hand filled with granular material that conforms to and grips objects. At CES, Empire’s interdisciplinary team of experts will demonstrate the hand’s abilities. Credit: Empire Robotics NCD Technologies, LLC (Phase II: 1127516) has developed nanocrystalline diamond-coated endmills with innovative diamond tipped coating technology. The coated tools were tested to determine improvement in tool performance, tool life and part quality and to compare with performance of uncoated tools and tools with other coatings. Credit: NCD Technologies Vaporsens Inc. (Phase II: 1353637) has developed a handheld, portable device that senses explosive com- pounds down to parts-per-trillion levels. The sensor materials have a shelf life of over one year, and the sensor array has been tested over a period of 15 days of continuous sampling without exhibiting any significant change in performance. When the sensing element does need to be replaced, the process is as simple as replacing a secure digital (SD) card in a camera. Credit: Dan Hixon, Univ. of Utah College of Engineering
  3. 3. IIINATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INTRODUCTION The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) pro- gram were conceived at that National Science Foundation (NSF). In 1976, Roland Tibbetts initiated an NSF pro- gram that would support the small business community with a specific objective to provide early-stage financial support for high-risk technologies with commercial promise. Today the government-wide program is administered by the Small Business Administration (SBA) and includes eleven federal departments that collectively award over $2 billion to small high-tech firms. NSF SBIR/STTR Program The primary objective of the NSF SBIR/STTR Program is to increase the incentive and opportunity for small firms to undertake cutting-edge, high-risk, high-quality scientific, engineering or science/engineering education re- search that would have a high-potential economic payoff if the research is successful. The current portfolio of the NSF SBIR/STTR program covers nine broad areas/topics: • Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology; • Advanced Materials and Instrumentation; • Biological Technologies; • Chemical and Environmental Technologies; • Educational Technologies and Applications; • Electronic Hardware, Robotics and Wireless Technologies; • Information and Communication Technologies; • Semiconductors and Photonic Devices and Materials; and • Smart Health and Biomedical Technologies To learn more about NSF SBIR/STTR Program, visit our website at http://www.nsf.gov/eng/iip/sbir/ Accelerating Innovation Research (AIR) Technology Translation Program The Accelerating Innovation Research-Technology Translation (AIR-TT) program provides funding for academic re- searchers to translate prior NSF-supported research discoveries toward commercial reality. Some grantees have already formed a small business while others have been guided from the outset by business partners who are interested in commercializing their translated discoveries. All are interested in moving their technologies closer to commercial application, creating new partnerships, and learning about additional markets/applications where their technologies could be competitive. In addition, an important component of the AIR-TT program is to offer an opportunity for post-docs and graduate students to engage in entrepreneurial and market-oriented thinking along with their traditional research experience. To learn more about the Accelerating Innovation Research Technology Translation Program, visit our website at http://www.nsf.gov/eng/iip/pfi/air-tt.jsp NSF SBIR/STTR Phase II Grantees Conference The annual NSF SBIR/STTR Phase II Grantees Conference is an opportunity for small businesses that have re- ceived Phase II awards and supplements to share their technical and commercial achievements. In the spirit of networking and resource sharing, we have designed this Abstract Book as a resource for our grantees and other conference attendees, potential investors, and strategic partners. We also hope to provide a snapshot of the current portfolio of NSF SBIR/STTR program. During the conference, there will be “Technology Showcases” each evening to provide an opportunity to visit and discuss the projects described within this book with the Principal Investigators and other company representatives. WE HOPE YOU ENJOY THE CONFERENCE!
  4. 4. IVNATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TABLE OF CONTENTS ADVANCED MANUFACTURING AND NANOTECHNOLOGY 1 Advanced Energy Materials, LLC 2 SBIR Phase II: Advanced Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts 2 ARL Designs 3 SBIR Phase II: Scratch and Abrasion Resistant Superhydrophobic Polymer Coatings 3 Coulometrics 4 SBIR Phase II: The Development of Higher Voltage, Longer Life and Lower Cost Activated Carbon Materials for Supercapacitors 4 ECOSIL Technologies LLC 5 SBIR Phase II: High-Performance Metal Pretreatments 5 Graphene Frontiers LLC 6 SBIR Phase II: Roll-to-roll Production of Uniform Graphene Films at Atmospheric Pressure and Low Temperature 6 Halotechnics, Inc. 7 SBIR Phase II: Advanced Molten Salt for Solar Thermal Power Generation with Supercritical Steam Turbines 7 Keystone Tower Systems 8 SBIR Phase II: Optimization of Tapered Spiral Welding for Wind Turbine Towers 8 Levant Power Corporation 9 SBIR Phase II: Integrated Hydraulic Suspension Energy Recovery System for Heavy Vehicles 9 Lite Enterprises Inc 10 SBIR Phase II: WIldlife Deterrence from Hazards Using High Brightness Ultraviolet Light 10 Nanofoundry, LLC 11 SBIR Phase II: Nanomanufacturing process simulation and design 11 nanoGriptech, Inc. 12 SBIR Phase II: Manufacturing of Bio-Inspired Polymer Micro/Nano-Fiber Arrays as New Gripping Materials 12 Navillum Nanotechnologies, LLC 13 SBIR Phase II: New Low Cost and Large Scale Manufacturing of Semiconductor Nanocrystals 13 NuMat Technologies, Inc. 14 SBIR Phase II: High Performance MOF-Based Storage and Delivery of Electronic Gases 14 Orthogonal, Inc 15 SBIR Phase II: Enabling Large-Scale Manufacturing of Organic Electronic Devices Using Photolithography 15 Persimmon Technologies Corporation 16 SBIR Phase II: SBIR Phase II Spray-Formed Soft Magnetic Material for Efficient Hybrid-Field Electric Machines 16 QuantLogic Corporation 17 SBIR Phase II: Development of an Adaptive Dual-Fuel Injector to Enable High Efficiency Clean Combustion for SUV and Light Duty Truck Engines 17 SenSigma LLC 18 SBIR Phase II: Sensors for InLine Certification Capability for Robotic Welding and Additive Manufacturing 18 Sinovia Technologies 19 SBIR Phase II: Nanostructured Composite Transparent Electrodes for Touch Panels 19 TAG Optics, Inc. 20 SBIR Phase II: Development of high-volume manufacturing processes for variable focus TAG Lens technology 20 ThermoAura Inc. 21 SBIR Phase II: Development and manufacture of a new class of high-figure-of-merit bulk thermoelectric nanomaterials 21
  5. 5. VNATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION XRSciences LLC 22 SBIR Phase II: Rapid Clinker Analyzer (RCA) 22 ZoomEssence, Inc. 23 SBIR Phase II: No Heat Spray Drying Technology 23 ADVANCED MATERIALS AND INSTRUMENTATION 24 Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing 25 SBIR Phase II: Autoclave Equivalent Composites Via In-Situ Pressurization 25 AeroValve LLC 26 SBIR Phase II: Energy Saving Solenoid Valve 26 Altaeros Energies, Inc. 27 SBIR Phase II: Ultra-light, modular wind turbine 27 Anasys Instruments Corp. 28 SBIR Phase II: Nanoscale Ultrafast Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (nu-DMA) 28 Chromation Partners, LLC 29 SBIR Phase II: A Photonic Crystal Based Spectrometer for Manufacturing Process Control 29 Construction Robotics, LLC 30 SBIR Phase II: Semi-Automated Masonry (SAM) Robotic System 30 Cyclewood Solutions, Inc 31 SBIR Phase II: Trans-esterified Lignin Thermoplastic 31 Daylight Solutions, Inc. 32 SBIR Phase II: Laser-Based Replacement for FTIR Microscopy 32 Double Helix LLC 33 SBIR Phase II: Widefield Three-Dimensional Superresolution Microscopy Module 33 Ecovative Design LLC 34 SBIR Phase II: Using Mycelium as a Matrix For Binding Natural Fibers And Core Filler Materials in Sustainable Composites 34 eLutions Integrated Systems, Inc. 35 SBIR Phase II: A Miniaturized Raman Optical System for Trending Glucose Levels 35 FemtoScale Inc. 36 SBIR Phase II: MEMS Resonant Nanobalance Dew Point Meters 36 Ferric Semiconductor, Inc. 37 SBIR Phase II: Integrated DC-DC Converters Using Thin-film Magnetic Power Inductors 37 Free Form Fibers L.L.C. 38 SBIR Phase II: The Digital Spinneret 38 Gradient Engineering 39 SBIR Phase II: Bamboo Fiber Processing for Use in Reinforced Composites 39 Heavystone Laboratory, LLC 40 SBIR Phase II: Functionally Graded Cemented Tungsten Carbide -- Process and Properties 40 Hitron Technologies Inc. 41 SBIR Phase II: Liquid Crystal-based Next Generation e-paper Devices by Micro-engineered Surfaces 41 INFINITESIMAL LLC 42 SBIR Phase II: Biomolecular Cell Injection With Nanofountain Probe Systems 42 Inprentus, Inc. 43 SBIR Phase II: A Novel Method to Manufacture Ultra-Precise Diffraction Gratings for X-Ray Analysis and Imaging 43 Iris AO, Inc. 44 SBIR Phase II: MEMS Deformable Mirrors for Laser Applications 44
  6. 6. VINATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Materials Innovation Technologies, LLC. 45 SBIR Phase II: Long Fiber Thermoplastic Composites from Recycled Carbon Fiber 45 Mezmeriz, Inc. 46 SBIR Phase II: Next Generation Displays Based on Novel Carbon Fiber MEMS Micromirrors 46 Micro Laser Assisted Machining Technologies, LLC 47 SBIR Phase II: Micro Laser Assisted Machining 47 Molecular Vista, Inc. 48 SBIR Phase II: Resonance Force Microscopy for Nanoscale Manufacturing Process Monitoring 48 NanoConversion Technologies, Inc. 49 SBIR Phase II: High Efficiency Thermoelectric Converter 49 Optofluidics, Inc. 50 SBIR Phase II: Single Molecule NanoTweezers 50 Premix, Inc. 51 SBIR Phase II: Composites Based on High Bio-content, Low Toxicity, Green Matrix Resins 51 REL, Inc. 52 SBIR Phase II: Development of a Selectively Reinforced Aluminum Composite Brake Rotor 52 Renerge, Inc. 53 SBIR Phase II: River Electrical Energy Devices 53 Watershed Materials LLC 54 SBIR Phase II: Using Geopolymerisation of Natural Aluminosilicate Minerals to Develop Sustainable Masonry Materials 54 zeroK NanoTech Corporation 55 SBIR Phase II: Low Temperature Ion Source for High-Brightness Focused Ion Beams 55 Zzyzx Polymers LLC 56 SBIR Phase II: Efficient and Effective Recycling of Post-Consumer Plastics for High-Value Applications 56 BIOLOGICAL TECHNOLOGIES 57 Active Motif, Inc. 58 SBIR Phase II: High-Throughput Multi-Analyte Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Assay Development 58 Advanced Polymer Monitoring Technologies, Inc. 59 SBIR Phase II: High Throughput Static Light Scattering Platform for Monitoring of Aggregation and Stability of Protein Solutions 59 Affinity Biosensors 60 SBIR Phase II: Rapid Assessment of Antibiotic Resistance by Mass Measurement 60 Alpha Universe LLC 61 SBIR Phase II: Inexpensive and Effecient System for Signal Amplification 61 Apama Medical, Inc. 62 SBIR Phase II: An innovative ablation device for treating atrial fibrillation 62 ASL Analytical, Inc. 63 SBIR Phase II: Continuous Near Infrared Monitor for Pichia Pastoris Bioreactors 63 ASL Analytical, Inc. 64 SBIR Phase II: In Situ Optical Probe for Real-time Monitoring of Protein Expression Bioreactors 64 BHO Technology, LLC 65 SBIR Phase II: Development of microalgae for commercial hydrogen biofuels 65 Bioo Scientific Corporation 66 SBIR Phase II: High-throughput Small RNA Sequencing 66 CytoMag, LLC 67 SBIR Phase II: Magnetic Capture Device for Rapid Isolation of Rare Cells 67
  7. 7. VIINATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Dynamo Micropower 68 SBIR Phase II: A Novel 10 kW Micro-turbine for Distributed Generation Applications 68 Enevolv, Inc. 69 SBIR Phase II: Ultra Rapid Genome Engineering in Industrial Yeast Strains 69 Filter Sensing Technologies, Inc. 70 SBIR Phase II: Portable, Low-Cost, and Robust Black Carbon Measurement Instrument using Radio Frequency Sensing 70 Fyodor Biotechnologies, Inc 71 SBIR Phase II: Recombinant Multi-epitope Mosaic Protein Design for Urine-based Diagnosis of Leptospirosis 71 Ginkgo BioWorks 72 SBIR Phase II: Novel Proteolysis-based Tools for Metabolic Engineering 72 Green Revolution Cooling, Inc 73 SBIR Phase II: Fluid Submersion Cooling for Energy and Cost Efficient Data Centers 73 Innervo Technology LLC 74 SBIR Phase II: Palatal Device Providing In-situ Sensory Feedback for Patients with Vestibular Imbalance 74 Lumicell Diagnostics, Inc 75 SBIR Phase II: Intraoperative Detection and Ablation of Microscopic Residual Cancer in the Tumor Bed 75 Lumiphore, Inc. 76 SBIR Phase II: Novel macrocyclic chelating groups for use in targeted radioisotope diagnostic and companion diagnostic/therapeutic applications 76 Miromatrix Medical Inc. 77 SBIR Phase II: A Perfusable, Revascularized, Cardiac-Derived Patch for the Treatment of Heart Disease 77 Montana BioAgriculture Inc. 78 SBIR Phase II: Combining Fungal Metabolites and Fungal Insect Pathogens for Cost Effective Control of Bark Beetles in Forestry 78 Ocular Dynamics 79 SBIR Phase II: Bio-inspired Multilayer Contact Lens to Treat Contact Lens-Induced Dry Eye Disease 79 OptiEnz Sensors 80 SBIR Phase II: Real-Time Biosensor for Measuring Hazardous Chemical Contaminants in Ground Water 80 Physcient, Inc. 81 SBIR Phase II: Detection and Prevention of Tissue Trauma During Surgical Retraction 81 REAL-TIME ANALYZERS, INCORPORATED 82 SBIR Phase II: A Rapid Foodborne Pathogen Analyzer 82 Solinas Medical, Inc. 83 SBIR Phase II: Application of a Durable Self-sealing Material for Hemodialysis Blood Access 83 TeselaGen Inc 84 SBIR Phase II: An Intelligent Rapid Prototyping System for Synthetic Biology 84 Third Eye Diagnostics, Inc. 85 SBIR Phase II: Non-Invasive Intracranial Pressure Monitor 85 vascuVis Inc. 86 SBIR Phase II: Computer Aided Prognosis of Debilitating Disease 86 Wasatch Photonics, Inc. 87 SBIR Phase II: High-speed Low-cost Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography System for Intravascular Imaging Applications 87
  8. 8. VIIINATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CHEMICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES 88 Absorbent Materials Company LLC 89 SBIR Phase II: Development of Activated Swelling Organosilica-Metal Composites Filter Media in Bioretention Systems for Enhanced Remediation of Stormwater Runoff 89 Akervall Technologies Inc 90 SBIR Phase II: High-performance Polymer Composites for Mouth Guards 90 ATRP Solutions, Inc. 91 SBIR Phase II: Amphiphilic Copolymers as Thickening Agents for Personal Care Products 91 Bettergy Corp. 92 SBIR Phase II: ION Gate Membrane For High Performance Redox Flow Batteries 92 Bettergy Corp. 93 SBIR Phase II: Novel Zeolite Membranes for Olefin/Paraffin Separation 93 Cambrian Innovation Inc 94 SBIR Phase II: Energy Efficient COD Removal and De-nitrification for Re-circulating Aquaculture Facilities with a Combined Bio-electrochemical Process 94 Cell-Free Bioinnovations Inc. 95 SBIR Phase II: High-Power and High-Energy-Density Enzymatic Fuel Cell through an In Vitro Synthetic Enzymatic Pathway 95 ELECTROCHEMICAL MATERIALS, LLC 96 SBIR Phase II: Engineered Solid Electrolyte Interphase Films for Silicon-Based Lithium Insertion Anodes 96 Filter Sensing Technologies, Inc. 97 SBIR Phase II: Vibration-Based Cleaning for Ash Removal from Diesel Particulate Filters 97 FiveFocal LLC 98 SBIR Phase II: Real-time Camera Analysis and Process Tracking (ReCAPT) 98 Flodesign Sonics Inc. 99 SBIR Phase II: A novel economic, efficient, environmentally benign, and sustainable multi-component separation technology based on acoustophoresis 99 Ground Fluor Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 100 SBIR Phase II: PET Radiotracer Synthesis 100 Innovative Energy Solution 101 SBIR Phase II: Clean, Inexpensive, and Carbon-free Energy from a Toxic Waste 101 IntraMicron Inc 102 SBIR Phase II: Synergistic Combinations of New Materials & Systems for Scalable Desulfurization of Distributed Biogas Resources 102 Itaconix Corporation 103 SBIR Phase II: Bio-Based Latex by Emulsion Polymerization of Alkyl Itaconates 103 Lignolink 104 SBIR Phase II: Advanced Development of Novel Maize and Sorghum Bioenergy Plants Using Lignolink Technology 104 Mango Materials 105 SBIR Phase II: A Novel Biodegradable Biopolymer from Waste Methane Gas 105 Modular Genetics, Inc. 106 SBIR Phase II: Production of an Acyl Glycinate Surfactant by Fermentation 106 Nanofiber Separations, LLC 107 SBIR Phase II: Efficient and Scalable Production of Functionalized Electrospun Nanofiber Felts of Regenerated Cellulose with Superior Capacity and Throughput for Bioseparations 107 NEXTECH MATERIALS LTD 108 SBIR Phase II: Superior Spinel-perovskite Composite Catalysts for Combustion of Volatile Organic Compounds 108
  9. 9. IXNATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION OMAX Corporation 109 SBIR Phase II: Development of Subminiature Abrasive-Waterjet Nozzles toward Micromachining 109 PH Matter, LLC 110 SBIR Phase II: Novel Catalysts for Air Cathodes 110 PolyInsight, LLC 111 SBIR Phase II: Scaling up the Synthesis of Novel Poly(ethylene glycol) Based Dendrimers for Targeted Drug Delivery Applications 111 Polymer Exploration Group, LLC 112 SBIR Phase II: Ice-release Coatings 112 Prasidiux LLC 113 SBIR Phase II: Development of Polymer Gel-Based Indicators to Monitor the Exposure of Shipments of Pharmaceuticals to Harmful Temperatures 113 Proton Energy Systems, Inc. 114 SBIR Phase II: High Efficiency Electrochemical Compressor Cell to Enable Cost Effective Small-Scale Hydrogen Fuel Production and Recycling 114 Rheonix, Inc 115 SBIR Phase II: A Fully Integrated Molecular Biosensor for Rapid Monitoring of Recreational Water 115 Serionix Inc. 116 SBIR Phase II: Ion-Exchange Fiber Composites for Rapid and Selective Removal of Perchlorate from Water 116 Sustainable Bioproducts LLC 117 SBIR Phase II: Direct Conversion of Lignocellulosic Feedstocks to Lipids and High-Value Products using a Proprietary Microbial Process 117 Sustainable Innovations, LLC 118 SBIR Phase II: Efficient Separation of Hydrogen From Reformate 118 Symbios Technologies LLC 119 SBIR Phase II: Advancing a Novel Low-voltage Electric Arc Method to Oxidize Organic Material in Contaminated Water 119 TeraPore Technologies, Inc. 120 SBIR Phase II: Asymmetric Block Copolymer Membranes for Ultrafiltration 120 TETRAMER TECHNOLOGIES, L.L.C. 121 SBIR Phase II: Commercialization of Innovative Low Refractive Index, High Temperature Perfluorocyclobutyl Polymers 121 Thixomat,Inc 122 STTR Phase II: New Process for High Strength/Weight Net-Shape Auto and Aero components from Mg Sheet 122 US Nano LLC 123 SBIR Phase II: Innovations in Nanowire Manufacturing: Large Scale Synthesis of Inorganic Semiconducting Nanowires and Application to Printed Photosensors 123 Vaporsens Inc. 124 SBIR Phase II: Highly Sensitive Nanofiber Sensors for Trace Detection of Explosives 124 EDUCATION APPLICATIONS 125 Academic Success For All Learners 126 SBIR Phase II: Adaptive Mobile Applications for Beginning Early Reading Instruction, Progress Monitoring, and Assessment 126 AgiVox, Inc. 127 SBIR Phase II: A Cloud-Based Service for Audio Access to News and Blogs 127
  10. 10. XNATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ApprenNet LLC 128 SBIR Phase II: Crowd Sourcing Apprenticeship Learning: LawMeets - A Web Platform for Teaching Entrepreneurial Lawyering 128 ArchieMD, Inc 129 STTR Phase II: Microgames for Improving Pediatric Compliance 129 Arqball LLC 130 SBIR Phase II: Interactive 3-D Technical Illustrations for Science and Engineering 130 Blank Slate Systems 131 SBIR Phase II: Sketch-based interaction for designing for laser cutters 131 Cohort FS, LLC 132 SBIR Phase II: CohortFS: A Replicated, Parallel Storage System for Cloud Computing 132 CueThink 133 SBIR Phase II: Development of a Media-Rich, Game-Based Social Learning Platform for Improving Math Process Skills 133 Eduworks Corporation 134 SBIR Phase II: Applying Semantic Paradata to Outcomes-aligned Assessment 134 Enclavix, LLC 135 SBIR Phase II: Project to Create an Automated System to Identify and Curate Web-based Resources for Entrepreneurs 135 EPIC Engineering & Consulting Group, LLC 136 SBIR Phase II: Implementing an Infrastructure Intelligence System for Water and Wastewater Utilities Using the Software as a Service (SaaS) Delivery Model 136 FTL Labs Corporation 137 SBIR Phase II: Interactive Multi-Touch Collaborative Table for Classrooms 137 Health Fidelity, Inc. 138 SBIR Phase II: Applying Language Understanding at the Point of Care to Enhance Clinical Documentation and Realize Quality Improvements 138 Independence Science, LLC 139 SBIR Phase II: Promoting STEM Education for Students Who are Blind or Print Disabled through the Development of the First Talking Pocket Size Scientific Data Collection Device 139 IS3D LLC 140 SBIR Phase II: Skills- and Assessments-Based Learning Environments 140 LaunchPad Central Inc. 141 SBIR Phase II: Cloud-based platform to support experiential entrepreneurship education online at scale 141 MammaCare Corporation 142 SBIR Phase II: Novel Tactile Online Nursing Trainer for Clinical Breast Exams 142 Modular Robotics Incorporated 143 SBIR Phase II: Learning Design Synthesis with a Mechatronics Kit 143 NOA, Inc. 144 SBIR Phase II: TerraFly-based System for Querying and Control of Mobile Devices 144 Numedeon, Inc. 145 SBIR Phase II: Building K-5 mathematical fluency through curriculum-based puzzle games within a collaborative virtual world 145 PublicRelay, Inc. 146 SBIR Phase II: Building a Flexible, Technology Adaptive Architecture to Support Processing of Content by Knowledge Workers 146 Scientific Imaging and Visualization, LLC 147 SBIR Phase II: Autonomous 3D Scanner for Building Interiors and Exteriors 147
  11. 11. XINATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Second Avenue Software, Inc. 148 SBIR Phase II: Martha Madison’s Marvelous Machines 148 Sensys Networks, Inc. 149 SBIR Phase II: Safety and Mobility System 149 starMobile, Inc. 150 SBIR Phase II: Enabling Rapid Mobilization of Enterprise Applications 150 Summit Performance Group 151 SBIR Phase II: Cloud-based Simulated Patients for Rapid Competency Development in Medical Education 151 The Spirituality Network, Inc. 152 SBIR Phase II: Emotionally Immersive Tele-Learning 152 Townsend Communications, Inc 153 SBIR Phase II: A Knowledge-Based System to Improve Student Advisement in Two Year Colleges 153 Triad Interactive Media 154 SBIR Phase II: An Online Professional Development Science Game for Pre-Service and In- Service Teachers 154 Workplace Technologies Research Inc. 155 SBIR Phase II: Accelerating Project Management Skills Development through “Experience”; Realistic Rehearsal for Project Teams in 3-Dimensional Immersive Virtual Environments. 155 Zyante Inc 156 SBIR Phase II: Developing a web-based authoring framework for animated interactive university STEM web content via curated crowdsourcing 156 ELECTRONIC HARDWARE, ROBOTICS AND WIRELESS TECHNOLOGIES 157 Active Spectrum Inc. 158 SBIR Phase II: Airborne Soot Sensor for Improving Fuel Efficiency and Reducing Pollutants 158 Adicep Technologies, Inc. 159 SBIR Phase II: Compliant Nonlinear Quasi-Passive Orthotic Joint 159 Artaic LLC 160 SBIR Phase II: High-Throughput Agile Robotic Manufacturing System for Tile Mosaics 160 Biorasis Inc. 161 SBIR Phase II: Self Calibrating, Wireless, Needle Implantable Sensor for Continuous Glucose Monitoring 161 Dioxide Materials Inc 162 SBIR Phase II: Sensors for Smart HVAC controls 162 Dynamic Spectrum Limited Liability Company 163 STTR Phase II: SpiderRadio: Enabling Cognitive Dynamic Spectrum Access Wireless Communications 163 Empire Robotics, Inc. 164 SBIR Phase II: An Innovative Robotic Jamming Gripper 164 FemtoScale Inc. 165 SBIR Phase II: Development of Particulate Mass and Count Monitoring Instruments Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical Resonant Balances 165 GridBridge, Inc 166 SBIR Phase II: A Highly Efficient GridBridge Grid Energy Router for Grid Modernization 166 Imprint Energy, Inc. 167 SBIR Phase II: Integration of Custom, Printable Batteries in Robotic Technologies 167 InView technology Corporation 168 SBIR Phase II: Low cost shortwave infrared (SWIR) spectral imaging microscope camera based on Compressive Sensing 168 KWJ Engineering Incorporated 169 SBIR Phase II: Screen-Printed Gas Sensor Using Nanoparticulate Catalyst 169
  12. 12. XIINATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Laserlith Corporation 170 STTR Phase II: Micromachined components for wireless applications 170 Leonardo Innovations Inc. 171 SBIR Phase II: Serendipitous Search System Using Lateral Analogy to Match Potential Solutions to Unmet Needs: Feasibility Study Based on Screening Approved Drugs for Repurposing 171 netBlazr Incorporated 172 SBIR Phase II: Low Cost Transparent Wireless Mesh Network Node 172 NextInput, Inc. 173 SBIR Phase II: Microelectromechanical Sensor for Touch Surfaces 173 ORB Analytics 174 STTR Phase II: Reconfigurable Wireless Platforms for Spectrally Agile Coexistence 174 PaneraTech Inc. 175 SBIR Phase II: Structural Imaging of High Temperature Furnace Walls 175 Physical Devices LLC 176 STTR Phase II: Universal Wireless Channel Selection Filter for Enhanced Access to RF Spectrum 176 Polymer Braille Inc. 177 SBIR Phase II: Full-Page Electronic Braille Display 177 Power Fingerprinting, Inc. 178 STTR Phase II: Security Monitoring and Intrusion Detection in SDR and CR Using Power Fingerprinting 178 Promethean Power Systems 179 SBIR Phase II: Improved Cold Thermal Energy Storage for Refrigeration Applications 179 Ratrix Technologies, LLC 180 SBIR Phase II: Low-complexity, High-throughput Wireless Networking 180 Reach Bionics 181 SBIR Phase II: Assistive Control System Harnessing Vestigial Neuromuscular Biosignals 181 S2 Corporation 182 SBIR Phase II: Photonics Enabled Extreme Bandwidth Wireless Communications Receiver 182 Spensa Technologies Inc. 183 SBIR Phase II: A Multimodal Sensor Platform for Automated Detection and Classification of Pest Insects 183 Sunstream Scientific Incorporated 184 SBIR Phase II: A Pneumatically Actuated Robot System 184 SupraSensor Technologies, LLC 185 SBIR Phase II: Development and Commercialization of Nitrate-Selective Sensors for Precision Agriculture 185 Tangible Haptics, LLC 186 SBIR Phase II: Electrostatic Normal Force Modulation for Haptic Touch Screens 186 Thalchemy Corp 187 SBIR Phase II: Low power hardware-software subsystem for intelligent sensory stream analysis 187 Triune Systems 188 SBIR Phase II: Micro-Solar Powered Battery Charger Circuit 188 United Science LLC 189 SBIR Phase II: In situ PFC Monitoring Sensors 189 VECARIUS 190 SBIR Phase II: High Efficiency, Compact Thermoelectric Generator (TEG) 190 VERISTRIDE, Inc. 191 SBIR Phase II: Real-Time Rehab to Improve Gait Symmetry in Amputees 191 Zipalog, Inc. 192 SBIR Phase II: Analog/Mixed-Signal Integrated Circuit Verification Coverage 192
  13. 13. XIIINATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES 193 Affectiva, Inc. 194 SBIR Phase II: Cloud-Enabled Analysis Of Facial Affect 194 BCL Technologies 195 SBIR Phase II: Automatic Extraction of Financial Data from Text 195 dMetrics Inc. 196 SBIR Phase II: Quantifying Consumer Rationale Expressed in Free Text Online Discussions 196 Gigashield Incorporated 197 SBIR Phase II: GigaShield USB Security 197 InferLink Corporation 198 SBIR Phase II:Statistical Inference for Advanced Entity Resolution 198 Learning Sites, Inc. 199 SBIR Phase II: Extracting Valuable Information Automatically from Objects with Surface Impressions via Photographs and Interactive Digital Surrogates 199 Lynx Laboratories Inc. 200 SBIR Phase II: Real-time, Low Cost Point-and-Shoot 3D Camera 200 Mental Canvas, LLC 201 SBIR Phase II: Reimagining Sketch in the Digital Age 201 Observable Networks, Inc 202 SBIR Phase II: Securing Industrial Control Networks with Network Forecasting 202 OmniSpeech 203 SBIR Phase II: Single-Channel Stationary/Non-Stationary Speech Extraction for Mobile Phones 203 Power Fingerprinting, Inc. 204 SBIR Phase II: Cyber Security Monitoring for Critical Embedded and Wireless Systems Using Power Fingerprinting 204 Private Machines Inc. 205 SBIR Phase II: SecureVault Cloud Platform 205 Safaba Translation Solutions, LLC 206 SBIR Phase II: Software-as-a-Service Customized Machine Translation for Commercial Language Service Providers and Their Clients 206 SecondWrite 207 SBIR Phase II: Analysis and Rewriting of Binary Code for Performance and Security 207 Sentient Corporation 208 SBIR Phase II: Analytical Modeling and Performance Prediction of Remanufactured Gearbox Components 208 Transmed Systems Inc 209 SBIR Phase II: Efficient Comparative Effective Research Tools In Real Time Environment 209 TRX SYSTEMS INC 210 SBIR Phase II: Collaborative Indoor Mapping Technologies 210 Veriflow Systems 211 SBIR Phase II: Reliable and Efficient Data-Plane Verification 211 VisiSonics Corporation 212 SBIR Phase II: Three Dimensional Headphone Audio for Music, Gaming, Entertainment and Telepresence 212 Whova 213 SBIR Phase II: Automated People Information Discovery and Mining 213 ZillionInfo 214 SBIR Phase II: Computing-Assisted Zoning Optimization and Service 214
  14. 14. XIVNATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION SEMICONDUCTORS AND PHOTONIC DEVICES AND MATERIALS 215 ARGIL, INC. 216 SBIR Phase II: Low-cost smart window film 216 Bridger Photonics, INC 217 SBIR Phase II: Fast and Accurate Laser Distance Metrology 217 ePack, Inc. 218 SBIR Phase II: A High Performance Environment Resistant Inertial Measurement Unit for Commercial Navigation Applications 218 General Engineering & Research, L.L.C. 219 SBIR Phase II: Chemically Impregnated Nanoparticles for Use in Copper Chemical Mechanical Planarization Slurry 219 Greentech Solutions, Inc. 220 SBIR Phase II: High Speed Laser Crystallization of Aluminum Doped ZnO Nanoparticles for High Performance Transparent Conductors 220 Innova Dynamics, Inc. 221 SBIR Phase II: Efficient Manufacturing of Nanostructured Flexible Transparent Conducting Electrodes 221 Inpria Corporation 222 SBIR Phase II: Aqueous Precursors for High Performance Metal Oxide Thin Films 222 Inston Inc 223 SBIR Phase II: Electric-Field-Controlled Nonvolatile Magnetic Memory 223 Invenio 224 SBIR Phase II: Dual-Wavelength Picosecond Fiber Laser Source for Label-Free Microscopy 224 Ler Technologies 225 SBIR Phase II: Defect Mapping Instrument for Optimizing Wafer Manufacturing Process 225 Lion Semiconductor 226 SBIR Phase II: Integrated Voltage Regulators for Small Footprint, Efficient Power Delivery in Mobile Electronics 226 LongWave Photonics LLC 227 SBIR Phase II: Tunable Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers for Spectroscopy 227 Lumiode, Inc. 228 SBIR Phase II: Monolithic Integration of LED Arrays and Silicon TFTs for Super High Brightness Microdisplays 228 NanoPhotonica 229 SBIR Phase II: Ultra High Efficiency Printable Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Display 229 Next Energy Technologies 230 SBIR Phase II: Improved Solution Processible Small Organic Molecule Architectures for Lightweight-Flexible Photovoltaics. 230 OEPIC SEMICONDUCTORS, INC 231 SBIR Phase II:Next Generation Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers 231 PLANT PV 232 SBIR Phase II: Low-Cost, Nickel-Based Metallization Pastes for Solar Cell Applications 232 Reveal Design Automation, Inc. 233 SBIR Phase II: Automatic Scalable Architectural Validation for Microprocessors 233 SmarterShade, Inc 234 SBIR Phase II: Thin Film Patterned Optical Retarders for Low Energy Smart Glass Applications 234 Soliculture 235 SBIR Phase II: A Sustainable Wavelength Selective Energy Producing Greenhouse 235 The Laser Sensing Company 236 SBIR Phase II: Towards Precision Ultra-Portable 13C/12C CO2 Atmospheric Isotopic Ratio Monitors Using Quantum Cascade Laser Spectroscopy 236
  15. 15. XVNATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Ubiquitous Energy, Inc 237 SBIR Phase II: Transparent Molecular Photovoltaic Devices 237 SMART HEALTH AND BIOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES 238 4-Web Spine Inc. 239 SBIR Phase II: Development of an Innovative Total Knee Replacement Device Leveraging Truss Implant Technology 239 Actuated Medical, Inc. 240 SBIR Phase II: Grip-Act-Reposition Miniaturized Stable Working Platform for Minimally Invasive Procedures Inside Active Organs 240 Avitus Orthopaedics, Inc. 241 SBIR Phase II: Development of a Minimally Invasive Device for Harvesting Autologous Bone Graft 241 Biodesy, Inc. 242 SBIR Phase II: Development of an SHG Instrument, Artemis QuantTM, for measuring conformational change in real time 242 BioSentinel, Inc. 243 SBIR Phase II: De Novo Assays for Detection of the Proteolytic Activity in Botulinum Neurotoxin-Based Pharmaceuticals 243 Carmot Therapeutics, Inc. 244 SBIR Phase II: A new drug discovery method to transform peptides to small molecules: proof of principle with p53-hdm2 244 CREmedical Corporation 245 SBIR Phase II: Innovative Electroencephalography to Advance the Research and Diagnosis of Brain Disorders 245 CytoVale, Inc 246 SBIR Phase II: A Cell Analysis Platform for Low-cost, Rapid Diagnosis of Sepsis Using Microfluidic Technologies 246 Deurion LLC 247 SBIR Phase II: A Surface Acoustic Wave Based Ion Source 247 Entanglement Technologies, Inc. 248 SBIR Phase II: A Real Time, High Sensitivity Atmospheric BTEX and 1,3-butadiene Vapor Monitor 248 Extend Biosciences Inc. 249 SBIR Phase II: A platform technology that significantly improves drug delivery 249 FlexDex, Inc 250 SBIR Phase II: Enhanced Dexterity Minimally Invasive Surgical Platform 250 Fluid Synchrony, LLC 251 SBIR Phase II: Wirelessly Operated Implantable Micropump for On-demand Drug Administration in Laboratory Animals 251 GlucoSentient, Inc. 252 SBIR Phase II: A Novel Device for Convenient Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Tacrolimus 252 Hospi Corporation 253 SBIR Phase II: Optimized Medication Administration Device for Palliative Care 253 Jade Therapeutics 254 SBIR Phase II: Biodegradable Polymer Film for Sustained Delivery of Antibiotics to the Surface of the Eye 254 Kaliber Imaging, Incorporated 255 SBIR Phase II: Mobility Monitor: An autonomous intelligent system developed to quantitatively determine mobility. 255 Koli 256 SBIR Phase II: A Medical Device to Treat Gallstone Disease 256 Montana Molecular LLC 257 SBIR Phase II: New Fluorescent Biosensors for Drug Discovery in Living Cells 257
  16. 16. XVINATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Nano3D Biosciences, Inc. 258 SBIR Phase II: In Vitro 3D Tissue Model for Toxicity Screening and Drug Discovery 258 NanoValent Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 259 SBIR Phase II: Targeted Nanoparticle Delivery Agent for Treatment of Adult Leukemia 259 OneBreath, Inc. 260 SBIR Phase II: A novel and cost effective mechanical ventilator for pandemic preparedness and emergency stockpiling 260 Ontash & Ermac Inc 261 SBIR Phase II: Development of an Affordable and Versatile Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) Borehole Tool 261 PharmaSeq, Inc. 262 SBIR Phase II: A microscopic electronic chip with sensors that can be implanted into living cells to monitor events in real time 262 Phase One Medical, LLC 263 SBIR Phase II: Development of a Distal Locking Hemodialysis Catheter System 263 Phi Optics Inc. 264 SBIR Phase II: Quantitative Phase Imaging for Life Sciences 264 Picosense 265 SBIR Phase II: Contactless and portable heart-rate device based on magnetic sensing technology 265 ProLynx LLC 266 SBIR Phase II: Controlled Drug Release from and Degradation of Hydrogels 266 Puracath Medical Inc. 267 SBIR Phase II: Novel Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter to Reduce Infections 267 Remedium Technologies, Inc. 268 SBIR Phase II: Sprayable Reversible Hemostat for Treatment of Non-Compressible Hemorrhage 268 Rivanna Medical 269 SBIR Phase II: Safe, Portable, Non-ionizing Bone Imaging with an Ultrasound-based X-ray Replacement Device 269 Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc. 270 SBIR Phase II: Metabolomics of Human Embryonic Stem Cells to Predict Teratogenicity: An Alternative Developmental Toxicity Model 270 TeVido BioDevices LLC 271 SBIR Phase II: Bioprinted fat grafts for improved nipple reconstruction after breast cancer 271 Tymora Analytical Operations, LLC 272 SBIR Phase II: Development of Novel Dendrimer-based Technologies for Phosphorylation Analyses 272 Weinberg Medical Physics LLC 273 SBIR Phase II: Cost-Effective Compact Dental MRI Scanner 273 Z Lens LLC 274 SBIR Phase II: Development of a Lens Replacement Device that Provides Enhanced Visual Acuity. 274 ZSX Medical 275 SBIR Phase II: Novel Surgical Closure Device for Minimally Invasive Procedures 275 ACCELERATING INNOVATION RESEARCH (AIR) TECHNOLOGY TRANSLATION PROGRAM 276 Arizona State University 277 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation - Buckled Stiff Thin Films on Soft Substrates for High-Resolution Strain Sensing 277 Arizona State University 278 Air Option 1: Technology Translation - Compiler Technology for Modern Manycore Architectures 278
  17. 17. XVIINATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Case Western Reserve University 279 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation: Low-cost, Metal-free, Carbon-based Oxygen Reduction Catalysts for Highly-efficient Fuel Cells 279 Colorado State University 280 PFI:AIR - TT: Technology Translation of Discoveries in Computational Modeling to Advance Thin Film Manufacturing 280 CUNY City College 281 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation: Automated Targeted Destination Recognition for the Blind with Motion Deblurring 281 Duke University 282 PFI:AIR - TT: Graphenated-Carbon Nanotube (G-CNT) Composites for a Miniature, Optical Fiber-Integrated Spectroscopy Light Source 282 Georgia State University Research Foundation, Inc. 283 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation: Glycan based point-of-care diagnostics 283 Georgia Tech Research Corporation 284 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation: Large-scale manufacturing of polymer nanotube array thermal interface materials for efficient heat removal from high-temperature electronics 284 Georgia Tech Research Corporation 285 PFI:AIR - TT: An Accessible Robotic Platform for Children with Disabilities 285 Georgia Tech Research Corporation 286 Air Option 1: Technology Translation - Network Deduplication for Smartphones and Tablets 286 Illinois Institute of Technology 288 PFI:AIR-TT: WC/Co Materials with High Hardness and Toughness Simultaneously Enabled by the WC Platelet Microstructure 288 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 289 PFI:AIR - TT: A Platform for Multi-Material Fabrication 289 Michigan State University 290 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation: Gliding Robotic Fish for Long-duration Sensing in Aquatic Environments 290 Michigan Technological University 291 PFI:AIR - TT: Blood Typing Device without Reagents: Sensing Electrodes to Replace Optics 291 Northeastern University 292 Air Option 1: Technology Translation - The Gear Bearing Drive: A Novel Compact Actuator for Robotic Joints 292 Northwestern University 294 PFI:AIR - TT: Hybrid Tri-pyramid Robot: A Novel Type of Double-Sided Incremental Forming Machine 294 Oregon State University 295 PFI:AIR - TT: Technology Translation: Air coupled transducer for acoustically assisted magnetic recording 295 Oregon State University 296 PFI:AIR - TT: Platform for Therapeutic Removal of Blood Constituents 296 Pennsylvania State Univ University Park 297 PFI:AIR - TT: One-Step Process for High Efficiency Textured Solar Cells 297 Princeton University 298 PFI:AIR - TT: Photo-type II-VI quantum well-based unipolar mid-infrared photodetectors 298 Tennessee Technological University 299 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation - Computationally Designed Shrinkage Reducing Admixtures for Concrete 299 Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station 300 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation: Enabling High Efficiency & Clean Combustion through the Integration of Low Heat Rejection Concepts with Advanced Low Temperature Comb Engines 300 University of Arizona 301 PFI AIR-TT: Improving Data Base Management System Performance Through Micro-Specialization 301
  18. 18. XVIIINATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION University of California-Davis 303 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation - Plant Based Manufacturing of Orphan Drug Human Biobetter Alpha-1-Antitrypsin 303 University of California-Los Angeles 304 PFI:AIR - TT: Integrated Substrate for High-Efficiency Low-Cost Organic Light-Emitting Diodes 304 University of Central Florida 305 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation - Superadiabatic Combustion in Porous Media for Efficient Heat Production 305 University of Colorado at Boulder 306 PFI:AIR - TT: Scalable NIL-membranes 306 University of Colorado at Boulder 307 PFI:AIR - TT: Technology for Sustainable Growth of Wireless Communication Capacity 307 University of Connecticut 308 PFI:AIR-TT: Prototyping bioabsorbable composites for bone-fixation applications involving low to medium loads 308 University of Houston 309 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation: Control of Ion Energy Distributions in Plasma Processing 309 University of Michigan Ann Arbor 310 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation: Prototyping a smart multi-dimensional micro-gas chromatography instrument with unprecedented peak capacity 310 University of Michigan Ann Arbor 311 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation: Development and Evaluation of Field Prototype for Determining Excavator Proximity to Buried Utilities 311 University of Minnesota-Twin Cities 312 PFI:AIR - TT: Variable Displacement Linkage Pump Functional Demonstration 312 University of South Carolina at Columbia 313 Air Option 1: Technology Translation - Functionalized III-V Nitride based Microelectromechanical Sensors for Neutron Detection 313 University of South Dakota Main Campus 314 PFI:AIR - TT: Complete Print-Read-Decode Prototype for RGB Upconverting Inks 314 University of Southern California 315 AIR Option 1: Technology Transition - Commercialization of Additive Manufacturing of Metallic Parts Using Selective Inhibition from Sintering 315 University of Southern California 316 PFI:AIR - TT: A Novel Reactive Separation Process for the Clean-up of Landfill Gas and Other Gaseous Renewable Fuels 316 University of Southern California 317 NSF PFI: AIR-TT: Real-time Power Measurement Software Technology for Microprocessor 317 University of Southern California 318 PFI:AIR - TT: Games Programming Assessments for Personalized Mathematics Instruction 318 University of Southern California 319 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation - Wireless control of distributed and implanted micro infusion pumps 319 University of Texas at Arlington 320 PFI:AIR - TT: A Fieldable Speciation-Capable Green Analyzer For Arsenic 320 University of Texas at Arlington 321 PFI:AIR - TT: Establishing Manufacturing and Large-Scale Casting Process and Structural Design Criteria for Ultra-High Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete (UHP-FRC) 321 University of Texas at Dallas 322 AIR Option 1: Tech Translation - Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Coating Tech for Integrated Electrode- Membrane-Inner Wall Case Coating for Long Life Commercial Li-Sulfur Battery 322
  19. 19. XIXNATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION University of Toledo 324 PFI:AIR - TT: Situational Awareness during Fire and Emergency (SAFE) 324 University of Virginia Main Campus 325 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation - Transition of Replicated Laser Micro-textured Surface Technology Through Scalable Process and Reliability Testing 325 William Marsh Rice University 326 AIR Option 1: Technology Translation: Microbial fatty acid production from renewable biomass sugars 326 Worcester Polytechnic Institute 327 Air Option 1: AIR Technology Translation - Lithium Ion Battery Recycling: From Laboratory Research to Industrial Commercialization 327
  20. 20. ADVANCED MANUFACTURING & NANOTECHNOLOGY
  21. 21. 2NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advanced Energy Materials, LLC SBIR Phase II: Advanced Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project is in removing sulfur compounds from various fuels such as diesel, gasoline and mixture of refined fuels known as transmix. It is critically important to reduce sulfur levels below 10 ppm as the emissions from transportation vehicles can cause acid rain and associated undesired effects. Sulfur removal from fuels is even more critical for implementation of fuel cell technologies due to fuel reformer catalyst poisoning at sulfur levels as low as 1 ppm or below. Finally, there is a need for sulfur-tolerant cata- lysts and sulfur removal processes in value added chemical production using bio-derived and fossil derived fuels. The global market for hydro-desulfur- ization catalysts in the transportation fuel segment is estimated at over $1B and growing fast. The company’s proposed catalyst could address a market size of $150-200M/yr or more. It may find additional applications in com- mercial markets in ultra-low sulfur diesel, fuel reformer technology and sulfur tolerant catalysts. The development of a scalable manufacturing method for advanced materials undertaken in this project will contribute to U.S. com- petitiveness and strengthen Cleantech and energy sectors in the state of KY. This project addresses the development of high performance catalysts need- ed for the removal of sulfur from hydrocarbon fuels. However, sulfur re- moval at concentrations below 50 ppm is difficult due to the presence of hetero-cyclic thiophenic species. During Phase I, the company developed a catalyst product and demonstrated its performance in terms of ultra-deep hydrodesulfurization activity, reducing sulfur levels from 200 ppm to much lower than 1 ppm in a variety of fuels. Phase II studies will allow optimization of the catalysts for hydrodesulfurization activity and mechanical properties. Catalysts with bi-functional activity toward aromatics hydrogenation and hy- drodesulfurization will reduce several process steps, thereby reducing the costs involved in hydroprocessing of fuels. Phase II studies will enable devel- opment of a process for scalable production of nanowires. The fundamental insight from the performance can be extended toward designing various high performance catalysts using nanowire supports. Some beneficial effects using nanowire supports include unique active metal/support interactions; single crystal surfaces for uniform morphologies for active metals and their alloys and management of active sites. Specifically, in the case of hydrode- sulfurization, nanowire supports provided an easier diffusion pathway for sulfur transfer to maintain active metal sites for desulfurization activity. Phase II Award No.: 1430633 Award Amount: $743,052.00 Start Date: 10/01/2014 End Date: 09/30/2016 PI: Juan He 201 E. Jefferson St, Suite 302 Louisville, KY 40202-1249 Phone: (502) 296-4469 Email: hejn.uc@gmail.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  22. 22. 3NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ARL Designs SBIR Phase II: Scratch and Abrasion Resistant Superhydrophobic Polymer Coatings This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project will leverage the advances we made in fabricating flexible polymer surfaces that shed water at low tilt angles while remaining superhydrophobic after abrasion. In Phase I we developed a model which correlated surface morphology with mechanical robustness. In Phase II we will apply this model to the develop- ment of a processes compatible with high speed, large-scale fabrication techniques. The roofing industry seeks material that is self-cleaning, anti-foul- ing and is highly resistant to weather events over time. A durable, superhy- drophobic polymeric roof membrane will meet this market need. Commercial success depends on (1) qualifying production speeds up to 100 feet/min, (2) proving compliance to current product requirements and (3) showing val- ue-add. Phase II studies will elucidate the mechanisms that contribute to the stability of the surfaces when exposed to UV light, allowing us to improve weatherability. Having demonstrated the self-cleaning properties of our polymer surfaces in Phase I, we will focus on anti-fouling properties in Phase II (i.e. low bacterial adhesion and reduced algae growth.) The broader impact of this SBIR Phase II project will be twofold. Foremost, a direct impact will be revenue and job growth in the US manufacturing sector. Secondarily, the technology will support federal policy goals on energy and the environment. Approximately $40 billion is spent annually in the US to air condition buildings. DOE funded studies show that in warm climates, substi- tuting a cool roof for a conventional roof can reduce carbon emissions which drive climate change. Cool roofs also relieve strain on the electrical grid by reducing peak power demand. Widespread use of cool roofs can improve air quality, hence human health, by slowing the formation of smog. Super- hydrophobic polymer membranes fabricated using technology developed in this proposal will help keep roofs clean and better able to reflect heat. Furthermore, coating of outdoor infrastructure equipment, such as wind tur- bine blades and offshore energy exploration platforms, will enable the safe operation of such facilities during icing conditions due to the ability of the superhydrophobic surface to prevent ice accretion. Field tests are underway. Food handling equipment will benefit from reduced adhesion of bacteria to surfaces, thus improving food safety. Phase II Award No.: 1330949 Award Amount: $749,995.00 Start Date: 09/01/2013 End Date: 08/31/2015 PI: Elizabeth Kujan 28 Morehouse Place New Providence, NJ 07974-2426 Phone: (908) 468-8124 Email: beth@arldesignsllc.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  23. 23. 4NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Coulometrics SBIR Phase II: The Development of Higher Voltage, Longer Life and Lower Cost Activated Carbon Materials for Supercapacitors The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project is in significantly increasing the ways super- capacitors and lithium ion batteries are used today. Supercapacitors offer very high power capabilities and high energy efficiency and have been used in many renewable energy applications such as hybrid buses and wind turbines. Currently, their use is limited due to high cost and low energy den- sity relative to Li-ion batteries. Coulometrics has developed a proprietary process that can modify low cost activated carbon materials into superca- pacitor grade carbons with 25% higher energy density and twice the cur- rent lifespan of existing materials. These critical developments will lower the overall system cost and improve cell life allowing for more widespread use of supercapacitors in renewable energy applications. Coulometrics has also shown that a very similar process can be used to convert natural graph- ite to lithium ion grade anode materials with higher energy density and significantly lower cost. This process will also enable a Northern American company to become the first producer of graphite for lithium ion batteries on the continent which can significantly reduce lithium ion battery cost for applications such as electric vehicles. Both projects will have additional envi- ronmental benefits including reduced greenhouse gas emissions, less burning of fossil fuels, and help protect the environment. The project seeks to break through a significant barrier that has kept ultra- capacitor voltage and energy density stagnant for over a decade and sig- nificantly reduce costs of lithium ion battery carbon materials. Supercapaci- tor companies all produce products with different carbons, electrolytes, cell construction, etc. and yet are all confined to the same performance specifi- cations. We believe that this is related to oxidation/reduction reactions that occur on the carbon surface; a fairly intuitive hypothesis; however attempts at solutions have been futile. The surface treatment we developed in Phase I has resulted in a reduction of these oxidation/reduction currents by more than 50%. This technology will lead to the largest performance gains in the ultracapacitor industry in over 10 years. Additionally, one of the most chal- lenging factors limiting market growth for ultracapacitors is their high cost, of which activated carbon accounts for 27%. Coulometrics’ treatment applied to inexpensive water filtration carbon, also developed in Phase I, has shown very similar performance enhancements, and will cost up to 95% less than commercial activated carbon materials. The surface modification process for graphitic carbons will enable the low cost and high quality production of carbon anode materials for lithium ion batteries based on natural graphite. This breakthrough can significantly reduce lithium ion battery cost which is a key element for more wide spread adoption of electric vehicles which will help reduce our nation’s dependence on the need to import foreign oil. Phase II Award No.: 1430918 Award Amount: $649,434.00 Start Date: 10/01/2014 End Date: 09/30/2016 PI: Edward Buiel 100 Cherokee Boulevard Chattanooga, TN 37405-3860 Phone: (423) 954-7766 Email: ebuiel@coulometrics.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  24. 24. 5NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ECOSIL Technologies LLC SBIR Phase II: High-Performance Metal Pretreatments This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project aims to devel- op a chromate- and phosphate-free metal surface pre-treatment product that reduces cost, and provides significant environmental and health bene- fits. Iron and zinc phosphate chemicals are currently widely used in surface treatment processes, which require from 7 to 10 process steps, consume en- ergy to heat treatment baths, and produce a large quantity of waste that must be treated. This adds cost, and results in phosphate discharge to the environment. Based on the Phase I project, a chromate- and phosphate-free pre-treatment chemical will be further developed in this project. This chemi- cal reduces the number of pre-treatment process to less than 5 steps, can be used at ambient temperature, and produces 90% less waste. It is expected to demonstrate enhanced performance in corrosion protection and paint ad- hesion over similar products. The broader commercial impacts of this project will be to dramatically re- duce cost, complexity and negative environmental impact of metal surface pretreatment in manufacturing processes without compromising performance. Potential applications will be in automobile, aerospace, steel (coil coatings), consumer electronics, appliance, and many other industries. An important so- cietal impact will be the better protection to workers in plants, as this process is not toxic and does not require elaborate waste disposal procedures. This project will also enhance the scientific understanding of mechanisms by which pretreatments contribute to the protection of metals. Phase II Award No.: 1152518 Award Amount: $710,219.00 Start Date: 04/01/2012 End Date: 06/30/2015 PI: Danqing Zhu 160A Donald Drive Fairfield, OH 45014-3018 Phone: (513) 858-2365 Email: zhud@ecosiltech.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  25. 25. 6NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Graphene Frontiers LLC SBIR Phase II: Roll-to-roll Production of Uniform Graphene Films at Atmospheric Pressure and Low Temperature This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project will demon- strate and develop technology for the roll-to-roll production of continuous graphene films. The graphene production technology is based upon innova- tions in the graphene synthesis and graphene handling, addressing critical deficiencies limiting industrial manufacture of graphene. The synthesis pro- cess is performed at atmospheric pressure, allowing roll-to-roll graphene formation on continuous tapes of copper foil passed through the growth region. This eliminates the need for an expensive vacuum furnace and allows fabrication of graphene films larger than the furnace size. The graphene handling process developed during Phase I enables the transfer of graphene sheets from the metal catalyst to nearly any smooth surface without any high temperature steps and without the use of harsh chemicals. Most importantly, the graphene transfer preserves the original metal substrate for reuse. The reusable substrate dramatically reduces the cost of graphene production and eliminates the largest source of waste in the process. In Phase II, we will demonstrate the continuous film processes for graphene synthesis and trans- fer to new surfaces and design a large area roll-to-roll graphene production system. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is through the indus- trial scale availability of high quality, low cost graphene sheets. Transparent, electrically and thermally conductive, strong, flexible, and gas impermeable, graphene is an emerging “super material” with innumerable proposed ap- plications including flexible transparent conductors for displays and photo- voltaics; high frequency electronics for communications; chemical and bio- logical sensors; corrosion barrier; filtration and water desalination; energy storage; and many more. Industrial quantities of graphene films will enable the development of these and other applications, with substantial benefit to society. The technology that we will to develop has advantages of cost, qual- ity, and design flexibility over competing concepts. Successful completion of this SBIR project will establish Graphene Frontiers as a leading commercial supplier of high-quality graphene to the business and research communities at an attractive price. Our business model includes revenue from sale of the graphene material, licensing of our proprietary growth technology, and spe- cialized products. Our first graphene-based product, TEM grids for electron microscopy, is already on sale with a development partner. These advances will position Graphene Frontiers to attract additional funding from investors, customers, and other non-SBIR sources. Phase II Award No.: 1330991 Award Amount: $752,606.00 Start Date: 09/15/2013 End Date: 08/31/2015 PI: Bruce Willner 3624 Market Street Philadelphia, PA 19104-2619 Phone: (267) 223-5051 Email: bruce@graphenefrontiers.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  26. 26. 7NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Halotechnics, Inc. SBIR Phase II: Advanced Molten Salt for Solar Thermal Power Generation with Supercritical Steam Turbines This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project proposes to develop a novel molten salt for solar thermal power generation with super- critical steam turbines. Solar thermal technology developers must increase the operating temperature of their plants to lower their levelized cost of electricity and reduce the cost of thermal storage. Building upon a successful Phase I program, the project team has developed a prototype salt mixture that could enable this trend. It is low cost, exhibits a melting point below 240 deg. C, and has a high maximum temperature of 700 deg. C, a broad oper- ating range currently unavailable elsewhere. The project will conduct a high throughput R&D program to rapidly screen up to thousands of unique mix- tures of inorganic salts to optimize the physical properties of the prototype fluid. The project will apply combinatorial chemistry techniques, originally developed for pharmaceutical applications, to this new field. After screening many candidates, the project will evaluate the materials compatibility of a few promising mixtures with common steel and nickel-based alloys. Corrosion mitigation techniques will be developed and evaluated. The project will con- duct flow testing in a lab-scale test loop capable of 700 deg. C operation. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project will be the enabling of low-cost electricity from the sun. It is imperative that society reduce its usage of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas, coal) to address pressing concerns - climate change and environmental degradation, energy security, and price volatility. Solar thermal power, a compelling source of renewable electricity at large scale, is the most promising solution to reduce fossil fuel use. How- ever, electricity from solar thermal power currently costs too much to be di- rectly competitive with fossil fuels. Furthermore, solar thermal plants need a cheap way to store heat in order to produce power after sundown or when utilities demand it. This project focuses on the material at the heart of these plants - the heat transfer fluid - and thermal storage system. The market for thermal storage is projected to reach $3.7 billion by 2015. Thermal storage is growing increasingly valuable as utilities realize the need for solar power that can deliver smooth, reliable output regardless of weather conditions. The development of the proposed innovation would both reduce the cost of solar thermal power and enable economical thermal storage, bringing the nation significantly closer to eliminating the use of coal. Phase II Award No.: 1230442 Award Amount: $599,999.00 Start Date: 09/15/2012 End Date: 09/30/2015 PI: Justin Raade 867 Vermont St. San Francisco, CA 94107-2614 Phone: (510) 693-7116 Email: jraade@halotechnics.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  27. 27. 8NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Keystone Tower Systems SBIR Phase II: Optimization of Tapered Spiral Welding for Wind Turbine Towers This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project addresses two roadblocks to reducing the cost of wind energy: the labor-intensive con- struction process, and size limitations imposed by road or rail transport for turbine components. The former issue drives up manufacturing costs and re- duces US competitiveness with countries with inexpensive labor, while the lat- ter forces sub-optimized tower designs and prevents turbines from growing larger and taking advantage of faster, steadier winds at higher hub heights. This project addresses both of these problems by adapting spiral welding - a well-understood system for pipe and piling manufacturing - to wind tower production. Spiral welding is highly automated, requiring as little as 10% of the labor of the equivalent manual process. It also combines multiple oper- ations into a single machine that can be operated on-site, eliminating trans- port costs and barriers. This project’s innovation is to adapt existing spiral welders -that can manufacture only straight,constant wall-thickness pipe - to producing tapered, variable wall thickness towers. A novel material geom- etry and automated control of machine parameters are the keys to trans- forming the standard system to one optimized for turbine tower production. With on-site spiral welding of turbine towers, significant reductions in cost of wind energy are possible. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project will be felt in many areas: technical,commercial and environmental. The system’s major contribu- tion is an increase in the use of wind energy for US electricity, enabled by both reduction in energy cost and increase in the number of cost-effective wind sites. Reducing the cost of tall towers enables increases in the height and size of wind turbines, allowing them to reach and be optimized for steadier, higher speed winds. With these increase in size and optimization, decreases in cost of wind energy of 12% (for 120m tall towers) or more are possible. In addition, the US land area for which wind energy is cost effective can be doubled at 120m hub heights. Spiral-welding of turbine towers also provides US jobs and increases American competitiveness with overseas producers. Because on-site production is inherently local, manufac- turing jobs are created in the communities where wind turbines are installed. Also, this method gives local production a major cost advantage over imports by producing towers that are too large to transport from port to wind farm. This allows domestic manufacturing to not only compete, but dominate in a domestic tower market worth roughly $1B in 2011. Phase II Award No.: 1353507 Award Amount: $685,785.00 Start Date: 05/01/2014 End Date: 04/30/2016 PI: Eric Smith 337 Summer St. Boston, MA 02210-1707 Phone: (857) 225-0552 Email: eric@keystonetowersystems. com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  28. 28. 9NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Levant Power Corporation SBIR Phase II: Integrated Hydraulic Suspension Energy Recovery System for Heavy Vehicles This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project proposes to develop a fully functional turnkey regenerative semi-active shock absorber for heavy-duty transit buses and other commercial vehicles. An appreciable amount of energy is lost in a typical suspension as heat, especially in heavy vehicles. Existing technologies have been unable to efficiently capture this energy in a cost-effective manner. This project entails hydraulic and elec- tronic model optimization, design of vehicle-ready prototypes, fabrication, lab testing, installation, and operational testing of a hydraulic adaptive damping energy harvesting system. The objective of the project is to demon- strate real-world benefits of an efficient, adjustable damping regenerative shock absorber on a transit bus in operation with a municipal transit agency. Emphasis will be on efficiency improvements, semi-active ride control, and application specific integration requirements to ensure seamless installation and operation. Work will culminate in a fully fielded pilot demonstration and quantification of regenerated energy (improved fuel efficiency) and ride improvement benefits using the regenerative semi-active shock absorber. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is significant if the challenges of inexpensively, reliably, and efficiently capturing suspension energy are overcome. The technology has the potential to save millions of dollars per year in fuel for large fleets, and significantly reduce carbon emissions in the United States and abroad. Effectively incorporating an af- termarket or OEM retrofit-able regenerative energy capture system may open doors to many new regenerative technologies in the transportation and automotive sector, facilitating significant reductions in waste energy. In addi- tion, the research may lead to enabling technology for compact, sealed, and efficient hydraulic actuators and energy harvesters across several industrial applications. This may have applications in other fields such as off grid ma- rine (hydrokinetic) energy, aerospace actuators, heavy machinery dampers, orthotics/prosthetics, and robotics. Phase II Award No.: 1127397 Award Amount: $1,100,000.00 Start Date: 11/15/2011 End Date: 04/30/2016 PI: Zackary Anderson 288 Norfolk St. Cambridge, MA 02139-1430 Phone: (617) 313-0822 Email: zack@levantpower.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  29. 29. 10NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Lite Enterprises Inc SBIR Phase II: WIldlife Deterrence from Hazards Using High Brightness Ultraviolet Light This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project represents a new development in man’s ability to keep birds away from the airspace surrounding an airplane or out of the way of the massive rotors of wind turbines. Animals respond to a bright ultraviolet light in the same way as hu- mans respond to a bright flashlight in their eyes. If the light is strong enough, it causes an involuntary behavioral response resulting in the animal being deterred from the area of the light source. Ultraviolet light has the advan- tage of being visible to most species of animals while being invisible to humans. This Phase II project builds on the Phase I project that demonstrated with 98% confidence that bird behavior is influenced by the presence of the wildlife deterrence system’s bright ultraviolet light in a completely natural environment with no human presence. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is focused on three high value applications of the wildlife deterrence system. They are renew- able alternative energy (wind farms), air transportation (planes and air- ports), and agriculture (aquaculture and agriculture). Renewable energy is at the top of the U.S. priority list. Wind energy is one of the most promising forms of alternative energy. At the same time, there is an immediate and pressing need to reduce the mortality rate of endangered and protected species at wind farms. A compelling global need for the wildlife deterrence system is exemplified by the aviation industry and the incidence of bird strikes. The U.S. Department of Transportation Inspector General reported in August 2012 that in the past two decades, wildlife strikes have increased from 1,770 reported in 1990 to 9,840 reported in 2011, a greater than five-fold increase. Thirdly, although not at the level of importance as pro- tection of aircraft and deterrence of birds from wind farm turbine rotors, worldwide seafood demand has grown annually by 8.3 percent since 1970. This means that worldwide aquaculture production has rapidly expanded. Of particularly promising potential are solutions to the mussel farming prob- lems of the international aquaculture industry which is well established in many parts of the world. All producing locations in North America and Eu- rope share a common problem of severe predation loss from diving ducks such as the Common Eider that can be devastating to the mussel producer, with the potential to wipe out an entire crop (100%). Phase II Award No.: 1350562 Award Amount: $708,488.00 Start Date: 04/15/2014 End Date: 03/31/2016 PI: Donald Ronning 4 Bud Way, Ste. 15 Nashua, NH 03063-0072 Phone: (603) 821-0991 Email: liteenterprises@yahoo.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  30. 30. 11NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Nanofoundry, LLC SBIR Phase II: Nanomanufacturing process simulation and design The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project is in launching a scalable, environmental- ly-safe, chemical manufacturing process capable of producing high perfor- mance, cost-competitive, and domestically-sourced magnetic materials suit- able for a large range of industrial and consumer applications. This will drive jobs growth in the US, reduce supply chain risk, improve national se- curity by reducing reliance on foreign sole sources for critical materials, and enable greater energy efficiency nationwide. Nanofoundry’s carbide-based nanostructured magnet material represents the first major innovation in per- manent magnetic materials since the early 1980’s. In combination with an innovative manufacturing method, Nanofoundry expects to produce a large range of high value nanoparticle materials at low cost at industrial vol- umes. The permanent magnet market is $14 billion and is growing at nearly 9% annually. Nanofoundry projects that its first generation product, Cobalt Carbide nanoparticles, could capture $600 million of that market in 2018 dollars and that its second generation product (for which this project is foun- dational), could have an 80% to 90% cost advantage over current products, with the potential to capture over 30% of the global market. This project will break through historical barriers in two areas: launching a new product technology to the magnet market-the first transformational innovation in three decades-and developing a commercially-viable manu- facturing capability to produce high-quality magnetic nanoparticle material at industrial scales. The specific focus of this project is to develop a scal- able chemical production process to manufacture magnetic Cobalt Carbide nanoparticle material, and to prototype the use of the material in an end- use application. Several key innovations of this program include (1) the op- timization of a class of cobalt carbide nanoparticles for use as a permanent magnet material, (2) the application of continuous flow microreactor wet chemical process technology to the manufacturing of high quality nanopar- ticle carbides at large scale, and (3) the use of supercritical solvents for efficiency and environmentally-friendly processing. Phase II Award No.: 1430991 Award Amount: $696,053.00 Start Date: 10/01/2014 End Date: 09/30/2016 PI: Daniel Hudgins P.O. Box 6061 Glen Allen, VA 23058-6061 Phone: (804) 869-3594 Email: hudginsdm@gmail.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  31. 31. 12NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION nanoGriptech, Inc. SBIR Phase II: Manufacturing of Bio-Inspired Polymer Micro/ Nano-Fiber Arrays as New Gripping Materials This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project aims to de- velop a pilot-scale production system and process to enable the large-scale fabrication of continuous arrays of elastomeric micro/nano-scale fibers with complex geometry. Inspired by hairs that occur naturally on gecko feet, these micro/nano-scale elastomeric fibers demonstrate strong adhesive, shear, and peel strengths over a wide range of test substrates. Unlike other classes of adhesives such as pressure-sensitive tapes, these biologically-in- spired adhesives can be repeatedly used over thousands of test cycles with very little contamination and performance degradation over the material lifespan. However, this class of material has only been able to be fabricated through expensive micro/nano fabrication processes including photolithog- raphy, chemical etching, or time-consuming batch micro/nano molding pro- cesses. In this project, a pilot-scale manufacturing system will be constructed, optimized and evaluated. A roller-based molding and peeling process for high-speed, continuous, and large-area manufacturing of high aspect-ra- tio and three-dimensional micro/nano-scale fibers with a compliant backing layer will be developed using elastomer materials. The broader/commercial impacts of this project will be the potential to pro- vide a low-cost, high-volume process to mass produce continuous arrays of elastomeric micro/nano-scale fibers with complex geometry for applications in apparel, sporting equipment, healthcare, defense, industrial clamping, and consumer goods. These fibers will provide strong reversible adhesive or enhanced shear interfaces that are resistant to contamination and maintain their adhesive ability over the product lifespan. Phase II Award No.: 1152551 Award Amount: $610,000.00 Start Date: 4/15/12 End Date: 9/30/14 PI: Paul Glass 91 43rd St, Suite 200 Pittsburgh, PA 15201-3109 Phone: (412) 224-2136 Email: pglass@nanogriptech.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  32. 32. 13NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Navillum Nanotechnologies, LLC SBIR Phase II: New Low Cost and Large Scale Manufacturing of Semiconductor Nanocrystals The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) phase II project is in removing key manufacturing barriers that are currently hindering commercialization of semiconductor nanocrystals in diverse market segments worldwide. The unique size- and shape-related properties of these materials make them ideal for light emission applica- tions (including lighting and displays) and light harnessing applications (so- lar panels). If successful, nanocrystals will be produced in large quantities, inexpensively, and uniformly, resulting in a disruptive advance for existing markets and emerging applications. With greater availability and afford- ability, nanocrystals can be more easily utilized for more energy efficient lighting and displays, improve color quality in displays (laptops, tablets, cameras and mobile devices), increase efficiency of solar panels, and pene- trate more widely into advancing applications in medical research, diagnos- tics and treatment. Emerging applications include the use of semiconductor nanocrystals for biofuel cells, lasers, fiber optics, electronics, security and surveillance, aviation and geothermal tracers. This project continues the work initiated in Phase I on development of a low cost manufacturing method for production of large-scale and consistently high-quality semiconductor nanocrystals quantum dots urgently needed for their commercialization. The proposed research activities directly address this need through an innovative proprietary low-temperature wet chemical synthesis route. Compared to the conventional high-temperature synthesis route, this method can more precisely control the size and shape of products - properties that are necessary for successful incorporation of these products into end-user applications. Additionally, it circumvents scaling limitations of conventional high-temperature synthesis routes. In Phase I, we have success- fully demonstrated scale up of high quality CdSe nanocrystal quantum dots in a laboratory scale while lowering cost of production using our method. This Phase II funding focuses on demonstrating scaled-up production of larger quantities of high-quality nanocrystals, including heavy metal free quantum dots using our low-temperature method. It will also focus on post-synthesis processing of CdSe quantum dots developed in Phase I to meet Original Equipment Manufacturers’ specifications. Scale up to commercially viable amounts will be studied by developing a continuous flow model as well as by improving purification efficiency of the low temperature method. Phase II Award No.: 1430979 Award Amount: $722,895.00 Start Date: 09/01/2014 End Date: 08/31/2016 PI: Jacqueline Siy-Ronquillo 717 5th Avenue, #204 Salt Lake City, UT 84103-3572 Phone: (801) 502-4601 Email: j.siy@navillum.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  33. 33. 14NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NuMat Technologies, Inc. SBIR Phase II: High Performance MOF-Based Storage and Delivery of Electronic Gases The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project is in the development of a new hazardous gas storage and delivery system for semiconductor fabrication that will sig- nificantly promote worker health and safety benefits at a reduced cost. The new system incorporates a new class of ultra-high performing absorbents, namely Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs), that will greatly mitigate the environmental and public health risks by reducing incidents of toxic gas re- lease, chances of equipment damage, and fabrication facility evacuation. Moreover, the use of MOFs enables an increase in the storage capacity while providing savings in ventilation energy, and reducing the risk of leak- ages over both high pressure mechanical cylinders and sub-atmospheric carbon-based storage. Given the current vast market share of activated carbon cylinders, the higher capacity MOF filled cylinders offer the pros- pect of substantial decreased in per wafer production costs by minimizing gas cylinder change-outs and fabrication facility downtime. Furthermore, this technology represents the first large scale commercial application for MOFs, thus opening the doors for this promising class of materials for other gas storage applications. This project aims to increase the capacity of gas cylinders for the storage and delivery of highly toxic gases, such as arsine (AsH3), phosphine (PH3), and boron trifluoride (BF3), that are commonly used in semiconductor fab- rication. As a safety measure, these highly toxic gases are currently stored at low pressure in activated carbon-filled cylinders. However, the capacity of activated carbon adsorbents is severely limited by their ill-defined inter- nal pore structure. NuMat is developing higher capacity gas cylinders by focusing on the following key technical objectives: 1) Design highly porous, well-defined, crystalline MOF absorbents to be integrated into cylinders, allowing for high capacity storage of these highly toxic gases at sub-atmo- spheric pressures, 2) Develop industrially relevant MOF scale-up procedures to minimize the cost of production, 3) Maximize the volumetric storage of MOFs in cylinders by developing high density MOF pellets, and 4) Integrate high density MOF pellets into cylinders to displace the lower performing activated carbon filled cylinders currently used this commercial application. Additionally, the technical milestones achieved in this project will help to establish the necessary foundation for incorporating this class of ultra-high performing materials (MOFs) into other gas storage applications. Phase II Award No.: 1430682 Award Amount: $749,930.00 Start Date: 09/01/2014 End Date: 08/31/2016 PI: Mitchell Weston 2 N LA SALLE ST STE 1601 Chicago, IL 60602-4081 Phone: (847) 859-9404 Email: mitch@numat-tech.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  34. 34. 15NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Orthogonal, Inc SBIR Phase II: Enabling Large-Scale Manufacturing of Organic Electronic Devices Using Photolithography This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project aims to devel- op a photoresist system that is compatible with a much wider range of ma- terials than traditional photoresists, allowing for the patterning of advanced semiconducting polymers and small molecules on existing photolithographic equipment. Through Phase I project, Orthogonal has improved its fluorinated photoresist system by making two new materials with lower manufacturing cost and enhanced performance. In this Phase II project, the patterning of the widely used conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(sty- rene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS) and similar acidic materials will be studied. Multiple approaches will be taken to continuously improve the performance of the new photoresist materials. The scalability of one or both photoresist materials to large quantities will be investigated by addressing the major issues that may be challenging to the scale-up, including dealing with heat generation and finding a suitable initiator. The broader/commercial impacts of this project will be the potential to en- able the large-scale manufacturing of organic electronic devices by lever- aging the existing photolithographic infrastructure currently used in the in- dustry. The availability of the new photoresist materials in large quantities and consistent quality will help meet the performance and volume demands of organic electronic industry, which is expected to grow rapidly once a scal- able and high-yield manufacturing technique is available. Phase II Award No.: 1058509 Award Amount: $999,631.00 Start Date: 04/01/2011 End Date: 09/30/2016 PI: John DeFranco 95 Brown Road Ithaca, NY 14850-1257 Phone: (917) 687-5792 Email: john@orthogonalinc.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  35. 35. 16NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Persimmon Technologies Corporation SBIR Phase II: SBIR Phase II Spray-Formed Soft Magnetic Material for Efficient Hybrid-Field Electric Machines This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project aims to de- velop a novel soft magnetic material and fabrication process for magnetic circuits of electric machines, such as winding cores of electric motors. The technology utilizes a unique single-step near net-shape fabrication process based on metal spray deposition to produce an isotropic metal microstruc- ture characterized by small domains with high permeability, high saturation and low coercivity with a controlled formation of insulation boundaries that limit electric conductivity between neighboring domains. The resulting mate- rial provides an excellent three-dimensional magnetic path while minimizing energy losses associated with eddy currents. It can replace anisotropic lam- inated winding cores, which currently constrain the design of conventional electric motors to geometries with two-dimensional magnetic paths. As a further objective of the project, a new hybrid-field motor topology, with three-dimensional magnetic paths enabled by the proposed material and fabrication process, is being developed. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to enable pro- duction of electric motors with improved performance and efficiency while reducing cost and material scrap associated with manufacturing of motor winding cores. Electric motors are used extensively in a growing number of applications, including robotics, semiconductor and LED process equipment, industrial automation, electric vehicles, heating, ventilation and air condi- tioning systems, appliances, power tools, medical devices, and military and space exploration applications. These markets drive an increasing demand for electric motors with improved performance, higher efficiency, and lower cost. Considering the extensive use of electric motors globally, the disrup- tive change resulting from the proposed hybrid-field motor technology with spray-formed winding cores is expected to provide significant commercial, societal and environmental benefits, including improved manufacturing effi- ciency, waste reduction, and energy conservation. Phase II Award No.: 1230458 Award Amount: $1,027,658.00 Start Date: 09/01/2012 End Date: 08/31/2016 PI: Martin Hosek 200 Harvard Mill Square Wakefield, MA 01880-3239 Phone: (978) 397-6240 Email: mhosek@persimmontech.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  36. 36. 17NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION QuantLogic Corporation SBIR Phase II: Development of an Adaptive Dual-Fuel Injector to Enable High Efficiency Clean Combustion for SUV and Light Duty Truck Engines This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project will prototype, characterize, and verify performance merits and the commercial viability of an Adaptive Dual-Fuel (ADF) Injector. Diesel engines are 30~40% more efficient than port-injected gasoline, spark-ignited engines. Gasoline and E85 fuels are among the most widely available fuels, but are mostly used on spark-ignition gasoline engines with much lower thermal efficiency than diesel engines. The key innovation of the ADF injector enables direct-injec- tions of both gasoline/E85 and diesel fuel selectively on-demand from a single injector. The ADF injector can enable advanced combustion modes that have demonstrated simultaneous reduction of NOx and Particulate Matter (PM) emissions and improved engine efficiency through advanced low tem- perature combustion. The advanced combustion mode enabled by the ADF injector can improve the thermal efficiency of gasoline/E85 engines by ap- proximately 30~40% by using gasoline and/or E85 fuels in a compression ignition combustion mode. The adaptive dual-fuel injector also provides flex- ibility for enabling engines to run on either pure diesel, gasoline-diesel, or E85-diesel dual fuels. The Phase II work includes prototyping, spray visual- ization imaging and laser based measurements, computational optimization, and single-cylinder engine combustion testing to demonstrate the commercial viability of the proposed ADF injector. The broader/commercial impacts of this project pertain to significant bene- fits for energy security and environmental protection. The potential customers include engine OEMs and auto makers. This project will significantly benefit US consumers through fuel cost saving, enable low cost methods to meet the new CAFE standards, and benefit the US economy by expanding the “green” manufacturing base. The dual fuel injector, developed and analyzed in this work, provides new capabilities, which can enable transformative combus- tion methods for ultra-high efficiency, clean combustion. The industry-univer- sity collaborative engineering research directly support graduate student research and will train and educate the workforce of the future, providing them with the knowledge and skills needed to address the challenges of energy utilization. The research and development efforts, which focus on a critical problem of global importance, will be widely disseminated to engine designers, OEMs, and researchers, while the next generation of engineers is being trained. Phase II Award No.: 1353613 Award Amount: $736,945.00 Start Date: 04/15/2014 End Date: 03/31/2016 PI: Deyang Hou 5111 Avondale Drive Sugar Land, TX 77479-3809 Phone: (281) 980-7288 Email: dalianqlc@aol.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  37. 37. 18NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION SenSigma LLC SBIR Phase II: Sensors for InLine Certification Capability for Robotic Welding and Additive Manufacturing The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project is in influencing the whole metal manufactur- ing and materials processing industries by providing the capability of “Cer- tify as You Build”. The in-situ measurement/prediction of composition, phase transformation and manufacturing defect using the proposed spectroscopic sensor may also allow for the fabrication of near net shape and proper- ty (NNSP) components with heterogeneous structures and complex geom- etries for additive manufacturing industry. The project’s vision is to achieve “zero-scrap” materials processing and metal manufacturing operations, en- abling dramatically reduced post-processing to identify composition, micro- structure and manufacturing qualities. The project would provide sensing and process control to reduce waste and save time during welding and additive manufacturing processes. These savings would directly convert to dollars for the manufacturer, so there is strong motivation for adoption. Thus the pro- posed smart optical monitoring sensor will significantly contribute to the much needed transformation of the U.S. manufacturing industries. The key innovation is to use optical emission spectroscopy of plasma to dra- matically improve welding and additive manufacturing processes. The inno- vation actually goes far beyond sensing to categorize defects and predict composition and phase transformations. Its success relies heavily on signal processing and understanding the physical mechanisms of the manufactur- ing processes being monitored. The sensor and associated algorithms will lead to much more efficient manufacturing because of improved feedback control afforded by the process information provided. The key challenges lie in demonstrating on the shop floor 1) in-situ monitoring and control of phase transformation and composition by systematic diagnosis of the laser induced plasma, and 2) ability to detect and categorize manufacturing de- fects through understanding the effects of different defects on plasma and designing effective algorithms to interpret plasma signals. Phase II activi- ties are directed towards meeting those challenges and establish the sen- sor’s reliability for its earliest possible commercialization. The project will contribute to the competitive advantage for American metal manufacturing industry with “Certify as You Build” capability with its spectroscopic sensor called, minimize material wastage and lost labor time, and increase long- term product quality. Phase II Award No.: 1430981 Award Amount: $723,106.00 Start Date: 10/01/2014 End Date: 09/30/2016 PI: Lijun Song 1600 Huron Parkway Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5001 Phone: (734) 998-8328 Email: ljsong@SenSigmaLLC.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
  38. 38. 19NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Sinovia Technologies SBIR Phase II: Nanostructured Composite Transparent Electrodes for Touch Panels This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project focuses on bringing the company’s transparent conductive films to the touch panel mar- ket. The performance, cost, and durability of current touch sensors are lim- ited by shortfalls of the current industry standard material, indium tin oxide (ITO). The company is commercializing a conductive plastic film with supe- rior performance, cost, and durability. This study will cover expansion of its scale manufacturing capabilities, allowing it to provide both pre-patterned and customer-patternable transparent conductive films suitable for use in the market. During SBIR Phase I period, the company migrated its lab-scale prototyping methods to processes compatible with at-scale roll-to-roll manu- facture of unpattenered conductive films. While each step of its process was individually scaled to high throughput, production of a final product requires that all of the steps be combined into a single process flow. This Phase II grant will allow it to combine these processes while adding the ability to pro- duce functional circuits in addition to bulk films. It will also allow it to continue pushing its films’ performance higher by utilizing new techniques and mate- rials to increase the clarity of its films. Finally, the company will thoroughly characterize the lifetime properties of its final product. The broader impact/commercial impact of this project will be significant, as it will result in a fully designed process by which the company can produce market-ready products. It will also result in functional demonstration touch panels to put into the hands of its customers. At the conclusion of the study the company expects to have secured a design win with a customer and will be in an excellent position to raise operating capital at low risk to its investors so that the company may begin shipping products. As a Silicon Valley materials technology company, the company’s success in the touch panel market will help bring part of a major market back to the US that has moved overseas. This SBIR Phase II study will allow it to expand the staff and also support jobs at the US companies whose toll-coating facilities the company uses for its product development and manufacturing. Phase II Award No.: 1330932 Award Amount: $909,999.00 Start Date: 08/15/2013 End Date: 01/31/2016 PI: Whitney Gaynor 247 Santa Ana Ct. Sunnyvale, CA 94085-4511 Phone: (650) 704-8629 Email: whitney@sinoviatech.com Program Director: Rajesh Mehta Sector: Advanced Manufacturing and Nanotechnology
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