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Creating just workplaces

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Explores why most current initiatives for creating just workplaces don't have the desired impact; whether unjust workplaces are symptoms of a deeper disease; and how Relational Thinking addresses the challenge

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Creating just workplaces

  1. 1. Creating Just Workplaces: Transforming Capitalism From Within Prabhu Guptara prabhusguptara@gmail.com
  2. 2. Structure of my presentation A. Preliminary matters B. Why current initiatives are (mostly) inadequate C. Unjust Workplaces: a symptom of a deeper disease! D. «Relational Thinking»: a movement for reform E. Conclusion 2
  3. 3. Please note • The intention of my presentation is to provoke you to think!!!
  4. 4. Structure of my presentation A. Preliminary matters √ B. Why current initiatives are (mostly) inadequate C. Unjust Workplaces: a symptom of a deeper disease! D. «Relational Thinking»: a movement for reform E. Conclusion 4
  5. 5. Why the sorts of initiatives most of us represent are not sufficient to create just workplaces globally 1. They don’t take into account the hierarchy of business life
  6. 6. Big versus small • 1,000,000 small companies employed 30 million people • 90,000 big firms employed 45 million people
  7. 7. Small companies=30; big companies=500 workplaces • If you had a chance of influencing only one company, it is obvious that the bigger company is the better one to try to influence • However, most of us, from the participant list, are involved in small companies. • So, however much inspiration and knowledge we gather, our chances of impacting the workplace for the majority of the world’s workers is rather small… • …unless we can find a way of maximising our impact – and we will look at that….
  8. 8. Berkshire Hathaway bigger than Hungary Hungary's GDP: $128.96 billion Berkshire Hathaway's Revenue: $136.19 billion - Fortune/CNN Money, IMF, http://www.businessinsider.com/25-corporations-bigger-tan-countries-2011 6
  9. 9. General Electric bigger than New Zealand New Zealand's GDP: $140.43 billion GE's Revenue: $151.63 billion Source: Fortune/CNN Money, IMF, http://www.businessinsider.com/25-corporations-bigger-tan-countries-2011-6?op=1#ixzz3EWnay7si
  10. 10. Exxon Mobil is bigger than Thailand Thailand's GDP: $318.85 billion Exxon Mobil's Revenue: $354.67 billion Exxon Mobil the world's 30th biggest economy Source: Fortune/CNN Money, IMF, http://www.businessinsider.com/25-corporations-bigger-tan-countries-2011-6?op=1#ixzz3EWrtUcHH
  11. 11. Walmart is bigger than Norway Norway's GDP: $414.46 billion Walmart's Revenue: $421.89 billion Walmart the world's 25th biggest countrySource: Fortune/CNN Money, IMFhttp://www.businessinsider.com/25-corporations-bigger-tan-countries-2011-6?op=1#ixzz3EWulb0jL
  12. 12. $491 B $478 B $476 B $415 B $331 B $242 B 0 100 200 300 400 500 ExxonMobil Royal Dutch Shell Walmart Stores, Inc Austria Denmark Greece Scale of Enterprise Revenue of corporations and GDP of countries in Billions of US$, IMF, 2014
  13. 13. Why the sorts of initiatives most of us represent are not sufficient to create just workplaces globally: 1. They don’t take into account the hierarchy of business life, which means that big companies have the greatest power and impact 2.Whether in small companies or in big ones, such initiatives don’t take into account the factor of levels of work and influence
  14. 14. Why the sorts of initiatives most of us represent are not sufficient to create just workplaces globally: 1. They don’t take into account the hierarchy of business and political life, which means that the big have the power and the greatest impact 2. Whether in small companies or in big ones, such initiatives don’t take into account the factor of levels of work and influence a. Individual (personal peace and prosperity)
  15. 15. Why the sorts of initiatives most of us represent are not sufficient to create just workplaces globally: 1. They don’t take into account the hierarchy of business and political life, which means that the big have the power and the greatest impact 2. Whether in small companies or in big ones, such initiatives don’t take into account the factor of levels of work and influence a. Individual (personal peace and prosperity) b. Teams at Work (harmony, creativity, productivity)
  16. 16. Why the sorts of initiatives most of us represent are not sufficient to create just workplaces globally: 1. They don’t take into account the hierarchy of business and political life, which means that the big have the power and the greatest impact 2. Whether in small companies or in big ones, such initiatives don’t take into account the factor of levels of work and influence a. Individual (personal peace and prosperity b. Teams at Work (harmony, creativity, productivity) c. Corporate
  17. 17. Why the sorts of initiatives most of us represent are not sufficient to create just workplaces globally: 1. They don’t take into account the hierarchy of business and political life, which means that the big have the power and the greatest impact 2. Whether in small companies or in big ones, such initiatives don’t take into account the factor of levels of work and influence a. Individual (personal peace and prosperity b. Teams at Work (harmony, creativity, productiveness) c. Corporate d. Global
  18. 18. Structure of my presentation A. Some preliminary comments √ B. Why current initiatives are (mostly) inadequate √ C. Unjust Workplaces: a symptom of a deeper disease! C. «Relational Thinking»: a movement for reform E. Conclusion 20
  19. 19. Other symptoms • Financial sector instability • Already glaring Inequalities growing even further • Shrinking provision of ‘public goods/ services’ • Environmental damage • Imminent danger of war • ……………………………………….. Are we in Crisis?
  20. 20. Social Challenges to the Global Order • Demography • Community deficit • Migration (c) Relational Research, 2014
  21. 21. The Demographic Challenge in Asia and Europe Data from the CIA, 2014 2.07 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 2.2 Singapore Hong Kong Japan Italy Germany Switzerland China Self-sustaining population Number of children per adult woman (TFR)
  22. 22. Debt mountain Sovereign Debt Corporate Debt Personal Debt
  23. 23. Disengaged Investors
  24. 24. (c) Relational Research, 2014 Disembodied welfare
  25. 25. Political Challenges to the Global Order • Disengaged voters • Identity politics • Size of multinationals (c) Relational Research, 2014
  26. 26. 0.00% 10.00% 20.00% 30.00% 40.00% 50.00% 60.00% 70.00% 80.00% 90.00% 100.00% UK Netherlands France Average Germany Spain Italy Election turnout % in the 2014 European elections
  27. 27. The need for a revolution in thinking Relational Research © 2013
  28. 28. A New Framework Understanding of: • Personal identity • Work • Poverty • Development • Technology • Business • Government
  29. 29. Relational Thinking An Economic Strategy • From debt to equity • Engaged shareholders • Relational companies • Relational Ratings Agency (c) Relational Research, 2014
  30. 30. Relational Companies • From debt to equity in corporate finance (through the tax system) • Measurement of stakeholder relationships • Relational Ratings Agency • Relational Capital Reporting
  31. 31. Relational Finance • Ethical basis of return to capital? • Equity vs. debt • Engaged investors • Effective accountability
  32. 32. A New Slogan • No investment without involvement • No profit without participation • No reward without responsibility
  33. 33. Responsible Government • Money supply • Regulation • Foreign Affairs
  34. 34. Relational Welfare • Rootedness • Co-location of relatives • Family Associations
  35. 35. The Coming “Age of Relationships” (c) Relational Research, 2014
  36. 36. Any movement, to be successful, must touch you intellectually, spiritually, and emotionally… and get you to act! • Comprehensible • Comprehensive • Inspiring • Persuasive (Strategy or overall plan) • “Actionable”: tells you what you can contribute to the movement today
  37. 37. The Relational Thinking Network: a network of SECTORAL networks! • Schools • Companies • Consultants • Scientists • Technologists • Politicians • Administrators • Lawyers • ….
  38. 38. The Relational Thinking Network: a network of Regional networks! • UK • South Africa • Singapore • Hong Kong • Australia • USA • (Switzerland) • …………………….
  39. 39. Some Websites • http://relationalthinking.net • www.relationshipsfoundation.org • www.relationalresearch.org • www.relational-analytics.com • www.relationalschools.org

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