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By
iNaturewatch Foundation
About WED
• WED is the United Nations’ campaign for encouraging
global awareness and action for the environment. It is
cel...
Why Celebrate WED?
• When we see or experience the negative effects of
climate change, environmental degradation or resour...
Trade in Wildlife
The booming illegal trade in wildlife products is eroding Earth’s
precious biodiversity, robbing us of o...
Overview
• The trade endangers iconic elephants, rhinos, tigers, gorillas and
sea turtles. Lesser-known species include he...
What is Wildlife Trade?
Wildlife trade is any sale or exchange of wild
animal and plant resources by people. This
can invo...
Reasons for trade wildlife
• Food
• Animal fodder
• Building materials
• Healthcare
• Clothing and ornaments
• Pets
• Spor...
MAMMALS IN
TRADE
Section one
Furs & Skins: Facts
• The wild fur trade in India deals with at
least 20 species of animals.
• Of these, 18 species are en...
• Three leopard skins and bones were seized in Pithoragarh on 30 April 2016.
-Uttarakhand Police's special task force seiz...
Ivory
Live Mammals
• Globally, as many as 80-90% of the primates used in
medical research come from the wild.
• USA, the largest...
World over, live animals are used in zoos, circuses, private
collections or breeding programmes.
Tiger Products are openly sold in Asian Countries
Rhino Horns
Recently a Rhino was
killed by poachers at
Kaziranga in May 2016
Shahtoosh
Musk
Musk deers are killed
for their musk glands
Antlers and Horns: Facts
• The antlers of deer such as Chital, Sambar,
Barking Deer and Swamp Deer are found in the
trade....
Antlers & Horns: Facts
• Antlers are used in cutlery handles and
buttons. Also used as whole antlers for
trophies or shiel...
BIRDS IN TRADE
Section two
Live Birds
• The minimum declared value of the world bird
trade is US$ 44 million.
• About 3.5 to 5 million wild birds are...
Birds in Trade: Facts
As many as 5,00,000 live
Parrots and Parakeets
enter the global trade
annually.
Thirteen Rose Ringed...
Peregrine Falcons that are used in falconry for hunting
smaller birds in Dubai.
Swiftlet’s Nest
REPTILES IN
TRADE
Section three
Reptile Skins: Facts
• It is estimated that India used to export US$ 60
million worth of reptile skins annually when the
t...
Reptile skins are used for manufacturing wallets, belts,
shoes, whips and other leather accessories.
Turtles & Tortoises: Facts
• In India, there are 16 species of freshwater and semi-aquatic turtles, six
species of soft-sh...
146 endangered tortoises, were seized by
Customs at the Mumbai International Airport
on March 21.
BUTTERFLIES
IN TRADE
Section five
Butterflies in Trade: Facts
• Trade in butterflies is estimated to be worth US$ 100
million per year.
• Taiwan exports upt...
Butterfly in Trade: Facts
• Banded Apollos found in Ladakh region, are much sought after
butterfly species. One specimen c...
Butterfly plaques used as drawing room hangings,
ornaments, pen holders, table mats and other decorative
items are sold in...
MARINE
LIFE IN
TRADE
Section four
Shells in Trade: Facts
• Commercial Trochus, a coral reef species,
was once used to provide material for
buttons and was e...
Aquarium Fishes
• The total annual world market for aquarium fish is
growing by 10-15% per year.
• Asian countries supply ...
Whale Sharks in Trade: Facts
• Whale shark is the largest species of
shark, declared vulnerable under the IUCN
Red List.
•...
Finning is a gruesome act where the fishermen sometimes
cut all the fins after which the living animal is thrown back
to t...
Lesser Known Wildlife in Trade
Sea Cucumber
Sea Horse
Hairs, Bristles, Scales and Feathers
PLANTS IN
TRADE
Section six
Plant in Trade: Facts
• According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 4
billion people rely on herbal medici...
Ornamental Plants
• The world market for wild plants, for
decorating houses and gardens, is
large as trade among collector...
Orchids
• Orchids are the plants that are
most in demand in the world
trade due to their spectacular
beauty and exotic aur...
LAWS THAT PROTECT
WIDLIFE
Section seven
LAWS
•CITES: International trade in endangered and
threatened species is regulated by the Convention
on International Trad...
Quick Five Steps
1. Being better informed about the status of wildlife
and wildlife products. Spreading the word and
encou...
WHAT YOU CAN DO
Section eight
Say NO to Wildlife Products
iNaturewatch Foundation is a Navi Mumbai
based charitable trust working in the field
of urban environment in India
Contact...
Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016
Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016
Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016
Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016
Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016
Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016
Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016
Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016
Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016
Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016
Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016
Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016
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Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016

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Presentation on Trade in Wildlife base on the World Environment Day Theme 2016 "Go Wild For Life"

Published in: Environment
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Trade in wildlife 2.6.2016

  1. 1. By iNaturewatch Foundation
  2. 2. About WED • WED is the United Nations’ campaign for encouraging global awareness and action for the environment. It is celebrated every 5 June since 1972. • This year’s theme for WED – Go Wild for Life – encourages you to celebrate all those species under threat and take action of your own to help safeguard them for future generations
  3. 3. Why Celebrate WED? • When we see or experience the negative effects of climate change, environmental degradation or resource depletion it is easy to blame others - governments for not prioritising environmental policy; industry for raising greenhouse gas emissions; NGOs for not lobbying strongly enough; and individuals for not taking action. • WED however is a day we put aside our differences and instead celebrate the achievements we’ve made towards protecting the environment. • By celebrating WED, we remind ourselves and others of the importance of caring for our environment. Remember that every action counts, so join us: every year, everywhere, everyone!
  4. 4. Trade in Wildlife The booming illegal trade in wildlife products is eroding Earth’s precious biodiversity, robbing us of our natural heritage and pushing whole species toward extinction. The killing and smuggling is also undermining economies, fuelling organized crime, and feeding corruption and insecurity across the globe
  5. 5. Overview • The trade endangers iconic elephants, rhinos, tigers, gorillas and sea turtles. Lesser-known species include helmeted hornbills, pangolins and wild orchids. • Efforts to protect them have scored some successes. However, these and many other species remain at risk despite international campaigns to influence policy and considerable investments in conservation and law enforcement. • To turn this tide, more people need to understand the damage this illicit business is doing to our environment, economies, communities and security. • We must also change our habits and behaviour so that demand for wildlife products falls. • More awareness increases the pressure on governments and international bodies to introduce and enforce tougher laws and combat those still willing to break them.
  6. 6. What is Wildlife Trade? Wildlife trade is any sale or exchange of wild animal and plant resources by people. This can involve live animals and plants or a diverse range of products needed or prized by humans—including skins, medicinal ingredients, tourist curios, timber, fish and other food products. Most wildlife trade is probably within national borders, but there is a large volume of wildlife in trade internationally.
  7. 7. Reasons for trade wildlife • Food • Animal fodder • Building materials • Healthcare • Clothing and ornaments • Pets • Sport • Collections • Religion
  8. 8. MAMMALS IN TRADE Section one
  9. 9. Furs & Skins: Facts • The wild fur trade in India deals with at least 20 species of animals. • Of these, 18 species are endangered or vulnerable.
  10. 10. • Three leopard skins and bones were seized in Pithoragarh on 30 April 2016. -Uttarakhand Police's special task force seized the skins of five big cats from Haridwar forest division and arrested one of the poachers belonging to Bawaria gang in March 2016. -In January too, seven leopard skins and bones were seized in the Lalpur area of Pauri district. Fur & Skin: Facts
  11. 11. Ivory
  12. 12. Live Mammals • Globally, as many as 80-90% of the primates used in medical research come from the wild. • USA, the largest primate market in the world imports 13,000-17,000 live animals per year . • In 1992, 200 Indian star tortoises were seized in the Netherlands bound for USA. • Other mammals traded are Sloth Bear, Clouded Leopards, Slow Loris, Red Panda, Hoolock Gibbon, Clouded Leopard, Leopard Cat for pet and large cats for circus. • Thousands of Spiny-tailed Lizards were collected in western India and used for extracting oil, which is supposed to have aphrodisiacal properties.
  13. 13. World over, live animals are used in zoos, circuses, private collections or breeding programmes.
  14. 14. Tiger Products are openly sold in Asian Countries
  15. 15. Rhino Horns Recently a Rhino was killed by poachers at Kaziranga in May 2016
  16. 16. Shahtoosh
  17. 17. Musk Musk deers are killed for their musk glands
  18. 18. Antlers and Horns: Facts • The antlers of deer such as Chital, Sambar, Barking Deer and Swamp Deer are found in the trade. • The main export of antlers or products from India is to Europe, Australia, East Asia and USA. • Major supplier states are Andhra Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra. • Total collection is estimated to be 20 tons annually.
  19. 19. Antlers & Horns: Facts • Antlers are used in cutlery handles and buttons. Also used as whole antlers for trophies or shields for decorating houses. They are also reported to be used in traditional oriental medicines.
  20. 20. BIRDS IN TRADE Section two
  21. 21. Live Birds • The minimum declared value of the world bird trade is US$ 44 million. • About 3.5 to 5 million wild birds are documented in international commercial trade annually. • On a global basis, one out of three birds caught from the wild survives on an average; one dies during capture and another during transportation. • As per the Wildlife Protection Act, 1972, keeping and sale of wild birds is prohibited.
  22. 22. Birds in Trade: Facts As many as 5,00,000 live Parrots and Parakeets enter the global trade annually. Thirteen Rose Ringed Parakeets were seized in Uttar Pradesh on 16 March 2016 by the forest department with help from Wildlife SOS
  23. 23. Peregrine Falcons that are used in falconry for hunting smaller birds in Dubai.
  24. 24. Swiftlet’s Nest
  25. 25. REPTILES IN TRADE Section three
  26. 26. Reptile Skins: Facts • It is estimated that India used to export US$ 60 million worth of reptile skins annually when the trade was legal. • Under the Wildlife Protection Act and CITES, all the following reptiles are protected by law, trade in these species is illegal – Marsh Crocodile, Salt Water Crocodile, Common Monitor Lizard, Yellow Monitor Lizard, Rock Python, Cobra, Rat snake, Russell’s Viper.
  27. 27. Reptile skins are used for manufacturing wallets, belts, shoes, whips and other leather accessories.
  28. 28. Turtles & Tortoises: Facts • In India, there are 16 species of freshwater and semi-aquatic turtles, six species of soft-shell turtles, four species of land tortoises and five species of marine turtles. • All the 5 marine turtles are endangered and three are traded mainly for meat. • Although international trade is banned, there are reports of smuggling turtles from India to Bangladesh for meat and of live star tortoises mainly to the Middle East for the pet trade. • Major centres for smuggling of tortoises for the pet trade are Chennai, Bangalore, and Ahmedabad. Both tortoises and turtles are traded as pet to countries like Europe, Middle East and S.E. Asia. • Turtle shell is used for making handbags, comb-handles, fancy hair- clips, etc. A handbag of Hawksbill shell decorated with corals, pearls and more, which is an attraction for foreign tourists, can cost up to a lakh of rupees in India.
  29. 29. 146 endangered tortoises, were seized by Customs at the Mumbai International Airport on March 21.
  30. 30. BUTTERFLIES IN TRADE Section five
  31. 31. Butterflies in Trade: Facts • Trade in butterflies is estimated to be worth US$ 100 million per year. • Taiwan exports upto 500 million butterflies per year, many of them collected from all over Asia.
  32. 32. Butterfly in Trade: Facts • Banded Apollos found in Ladakh region, are much sought after butterfly species. One specimen can fetch upto thousands of dollars in Europe and USA. • Main collection centres- Himalayan and Trans Himalayan region, North East India, Andaman and Nicobar Islands.
  33. 33. Butterfly plaques used as drawing room hangings, ornaments, pen holders, table mats and other decorative items are sold in many countries.
  34. 34. MARINE LIFE IN TRADE Section four
  35. 35. Shells in Trade: Facts • Commercial Trochus, a coral reef species, was once used to provide material for buttons and was exported from India. It is still being fished in small quantities for decorative purposes. • Turban shells provide mother-of-pearl for making decorative buttons, beads and jewellery. They are much in demand for making curios and utilitarian articles. • Conches are collected for decorative purposes. • Sacred chanks are exploited for the popular bangle industry in West Bengal. Imported from Sri Lanka, it is one of the most traded shells. • Giant Clams are the largest bivalves in the world and are mostly exploited for edible purposes by the local population.
  36. 36. Aquarium Fishes • The total annual world market for aquarium fish is growing by 10-15% per year. • Asian countries supply most of the freshwater aquarium fishes in the market today. • As many as 340-500 million fish are kept as pets in USA alone. • USA imports some 125 million ornamental fish per year. • One study indicates that only 300 fish out of the 1,000 taken from the sea survive on an average. • India exports Aquarium fish annually to various countries including USA, Japan, Malaysia, Nepal, Singapore, Netherlands, Germany and others.
  37. 37. Whale Sharks in Trade: Facts • Whale shark is the largest species of shark, declared vulnerable under the IUCN Red List. • India banned whale shark hunting in 2001, making it the first fish to be protected under the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. • Fins are exported and used for making fin- soup, and the liver is used to extract an oil, which is consumed locally.
  38. 38. Finning is a gruesome act where the fishermen sometimes cut all the fins after which the living animal is thrown back to the water, to die a slow and horrifying death.
  39. 39. Lesser Known Wildlife in Trade Sea Cucumber
  40. 40. Sea Horse
  41. 41. Hairs, Bristles, Scales and Feathers
  42. 42. PLANTS IN TRADE Section six
  43. 43. Plant in Trade: Facts • According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 4 billion people rely on herbal medicines to some extent. • India and Brazil are the largest exporters of medicinal plants. • In India, the collection of medicinal plants continues unabated especially in the North-east, the Himalayas and the Western Ghats. • The notion that a plant collected from the wild is more efficacious than a cultivated one pose problems for plant conservation. Hence, the wild plant may fetch up to three times as much as a cultivated variety. • Medicinal plants are traded as chips, pulp, bark, fruit, root, wood, herb, flower, seed, petals, rhizomes, nuts, shells and others. • Plants that are in trade are Indian Birthwort, Himalayan May apple, Kutki, Indian Serpent root, Yam, Himalayan Spikenard, Golden Moss, and Yew. These medicinally important plants are highly endangered and are protected under Wildlife Protection Act.
  44. 44. Ornamental Plants • The world market for wild plants, for decorating houses and gardens, is large as trade among collectors adds to the peril of species that are rare and difficult to cultivate. • Such as Cactus ,Rare Cycads and Carnivorous plants
  45. 45. Orchids • Orchids are the plants that are most in demand in the world trade due to their spectacular beauty and exotic aura. Orchids, like the very rare Lady’s Slipper (Paphiopedilum rothschildianum), are sold at high price. • Orchid trade centres in India include Kalimpong, Shillong and Trivandrum. • Wild orchids are often smuggled out of the country as cut flowers by wrongly declaring them as lilies or other exotic flowers.
  46. 46. LAWS THAT PROTECT WIDLIFE Section seven
  47. 47. LAWS •CITES: International trade in endangered and threatened species is regulated by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wildlife Fauna and Flora (CITES) which strives to ensure that international trade in wild animals and plants is legal, sustainable and traceable and is not detrimental to the survival of the species in the wild. International commercial trade is strictly prohibited for those species listed as Appendix I. • Wildlife Protection Act 1972 • TRAFFIC
  48. 48. Quick Five Steps 1. Being better informed about the status of wildlife and wildlife products. Spreading the word and encouraging others to get better informed 2. Supporting governments and local communities to tackle the illegal trade in wildlife 3. Reporting crimes when they are witnessed through mobile technology and national hotlines 4. Working to reduce human-wildlife conflict for land and resources at community level 5. Making individual choices that don’t threaten species such as not buying products from wildlife protected by law and by supporting companies that demonstrate sustainable supply chains and environmentally responsible policies.
  49. 49. WHAT YOU CAN DO Section eight
  50. 50. Say NO to Wildlife Products
  51. 51. iNaturewatch Foundation is a Navi Mumbai based charitable trust working in the field of urban environment in India Contact: 2 Mandar, Plot A-23, Sector-12, Kharghar, Navi Mumbia- 410210. 9820165525, inaturewatch@gmail.com, www.inaturewatch.org

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