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ENGINEERS AUSTRALIA
Chartered Status
- a Handbook for Applicants
ENGINEERS AUSTRALIA
Chartered Status – A Handbook for Applicants
STATUS	 REVISION	 DATE	 AUTHORISATION
Controlled Document	 02/2011	 February 2011	 Director, Education and Assessment
Note:
This Chartered Status Handbook for Applicants undergoes regular critical review and revision to reflect
contemporary Engineers competencies and how they are gained. Accordingly, Applicants for Chartered Status
should refer to the current version of the Chartered Status Handbook for Applicants on the Engineers Australia
website at http://www.engineersaustralia.org.au/professional-development
2
© Copyright Engineers Australia 2011
This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced
by any process without prior written permission from Engineers Australia. Requests and inquiries concerning the
reproduction and rights should be addressed to the Director Education and Assessment, Engineers Australia,
11 National Circuit Barton ACT 2600.
FOREWORD
Congratulations on your decision to seek Chartered Status. In doing so, you
have acknowledged that academic qualifications are only the beginning of
a career in engineering and that continuing professional development is
an essential component of maintaining your knowledge after initial formal
education has been completed.
Chartered Status is the next important goal in a career in engineering.
Professional Engineers, Engineering Technologists and Engineering Officers
(Associates) who attain Chartered Status represent the highest professional
standards, expressing a commitment to keeping pace with the increasing
expectations and requirements of engineering in our modern world. Chartered
Status is a credential which affords you international recognition and most
importantly, certification that you are competent to practise and exercise
leadership within the engineering team.
Engineering employers, clients and governments are increasingly valuing the
quality and professionalism that Chartered Status represents as insurance
against risk and uncertainty and to match expectations of value and safety.
Additionally, Chartered Status is the linkage to registration, which is becoming
more important to governments and consumers of engineering services.
Having met the additional requirements of Engineers Australia, Chartered
practitioners automatically qualify to join the National Professional Engineers
Register (NPER), the National Engineering Technologists Register (NETR) or
the National Engineering Associates Register (NEAR). Chartered Status will
also provide a pathway to registration in Queensland under that state’s
Professional Engineers Act.
This handbook has been designed to assist you in preparing for the
competency based assessment for Chartered Status in one of the three
occupational categories: Chartered Professional Engineer (CPEng), Chartered
Engineering Technologist (CEngT) and Chartered Engineering Officer (CEngO)
and subsequent registration on the respective register.
The achievement of Chartered Status and Registration will require effort and
determination on your part. However, I can assure you that the benefits that
will flow to you will make it well worth your while.
We are here to support you throughout the whole process.
Peter Taylor FIEAust CPEng
Chief Executive
3
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CONTENTS
Introduction
Chartered Status Pathways .................................................................................................. 6
Defining the Engineering Team........................................................................................... 7
Competency Terms.................................................................................................................10
Professional Formation.........................................................................................................10
Engineering Practice Report
Preparing your Engineering Practice Report..................................................................11
Preparing for your Competency Based Assessment...................................................11
Mature Experienced Engineers Pathway to Chartered Status................................13
Appendix A
Stage 2 Competency Units and Elements......................................................................14
Appendix B
Registration, Areas of Practice, Colleges and International Agreements............17
Appendix C
Part 1: Stage 2 Competency Units, Elements and Defining Activities.................22
Part 2: Standards to which Stage 2 Competencies must be Demonstrated......36
Appendix D
Example of a Career Episode Report................................................................................39
Appendix E
Code of Ethics...........................................................................................................................41
Appendix F
Engineers Australia Accredited Assessors......................................................................44
Appendix G
Application for Chartered Status of Engineers Australia..........................................45
5
6
INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this handbook is to crystallise your understanding of engineering competencies and how they are gained.
You will be able to apply this to preparing your Engineering Practice Report and successfully completing your application.
Please follow the handbook carefully for the best results.
To become a Chartered Engineer (CPEng), Technologist (CEngT) or Officer (Associate) (CEngO) you must be eligible for
membership of Engineers Australia. Please visit www.engineersaustralia.org.au under Membership for information on
becoming a member.
CHARTERED STATUS PATHWAYS
This diagram simplifies how to obtain and maintain Chartered Status for Engineers, Technologists and Officers (Associates):
Eligibility
Requirements:
1.	 Membership of Engineers
Australia or eligibility to become
a member
2.	 Period of professional formation
representing 3+ years of
engineering experience
Maintaining
Chartered Status:
•	 150 hours of Continuing
Professional Development
required every 3 years
•	 Subject to audit every 5 years
The four ways
to become Chartered:
1.	Engineering Practice Report +
Professional Interview
•	Submit one report for
assessment
•	Attend professional interview
2.	Professional Development
Program + Professional
Interview
•	Submit continuous Career
Episode Reports and be
assessed for each
•	Attend professional interview
3.	Mature Experienced Engineers
Pathway
•	Submit Statement of
Experience and Continuing
Professional Development
record
•	Attend professional interview
•	Requires 15+ years of
experience including 5 in
position(s) of responsibility
•	Must be an Engineers Australia
member
4.	Mutual Recognition Agreement
•	Recognised international
qualification is checked and
verified
7
DEFINING THE ENGINEERING TEAM
The engineering team includes a variety of occupations and specialisations. This handbook covers
three occupational categories: Professional Engineer, Engineering Technologist and Engineering
Officer (also known as Engineering Associate).
PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS
The benchmark Stage 1 qualification for Professional Engineers is the four-year Bachelor of
Engineering degree.
Professional Engineers are responsible for interpreting technological possibilities to society,
business and government. They are also responsible for ensuring, as far as possible, that policy
decisions are properly informed, and that costs, risks and limitations are properly understood as
the desired outcomes. Professional Engineers are required to take responsibility for engineering
projects and programs in the most far-reaching sense. They are responsible for the reliable
functioning of all materials and technologies used; integration to form complete and self-
consistent systems; and all interactions between the technical systems and the environment in
which they function. The latter includes understanding the requirements of clients and of society
as a whole; working to optimise social, environmental and economic outcomes over the lifetime of
the product or program; interacting effectively with the other disciplines, professions and people
involved; and ensuring that the engineering contribution is properly integrated into the totality of
the undertaking.
Professional Engineers at the level of Stage 2 competency are expected to have demonstrated the
propensity to take charge of major projects or interactions in a work situation, even if they have
not actually done so.
The work of Professional Engineers is predominately intellectual in nature. In the technical
domain, they are primarily concerned with the advancement of technologies and with the
development of new technologies and their applications through innovation, creativity and
change. They may conduct research concerned with advancing the science of engineering and with
developing new engineering principles and technologies. Alternatively, they may contribute to
continual improvement in the practice of engineering, and to devising and updating the Codes and
Standards that govern it.
Professional Engineers have a particular responsibility for ensuring that all aspects of a project
are soundly based in theory and fundamental principle, and for understanding how new
developments relate to established practice and to other disciplines with which they may interact.
One hallmark of a professional is the capacity to break new ground in an informed and responsible
way.
Professional Engineers may lead or manage teams appropriate to these activities, may establish
their own companies or move into senior management roles in engineering and related
enterprises.
8
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGISTS
The benchmark Stage 1 qualification for Engineering Technologists is the three-year Bachelor of Engineering
degree.
Engineering Technologists normally operate within a relatively well-defined technical environment and
undertake a wide range of functions and responsibilities. They are typically specialists in a particular field
of engineering technology and their expertise lies in familiarity with its current state of development and
its most recent applications. Within their specialist field, their expertise may be at a high level and fully
equivalent to that of a Professional Engineer. However, Engineering Technologists are not expected to exercise
the same breadth of perspective as a Professional Engineer nor carry the same responsibilities for stakeholder
interactions, for system integration and for synthesizing overall approaches to complex situations and complex
engineering problems.
The work of Engineering Technologists combines the need for a strong grasp of practical situations and
applications, with the intellectual challenge of keeping abreast of leading-edge developments in their particular
field. For this purpose they need a strong understanding of scientific and engineering principles and a well-
developed capacity for analysis. The work of Engineering Technologists is mostly about applying current and
emerging technologies, often in new contexts or to applying established principles in the development of new
practice. They may contribute to the advancement of particular technologies as well.
Some Engineering Technologist qualifications include an emphasis on technical management as well as
a grounding in a particular area of technology. Technical management is seen as an appropriate field of
specialisation in itself and many Engineering Technologists build their own career paths in this direction.
Examples of such specialisation include product development, mine management, and the management and
maintenance of processing plants, complex building services or testing laboratories.
Persons may also be recognised as Engineering Technologists who hold degrees in fields related to engineering
and who have developed expertise and experience in applying their knowledge in conjunction with engineering
work. Examples might be in geology and geotechnics, information technology and software development,
mining, biomedical technology, optical communications, renewable energy systems and agriculture.
The competencies of Engineering Technologists equip them to approve and certify many technical operations
such as calibration and testing regimes, compliance with performance-based criteria for fire safety and the
design of components and sub-systems and of installations such as building services that do not call for
significant new development. Such certification should be fully acceptable in the public domain and should not
require further endorsement by other practitioners perceived to be more highly qualified.
Engineering Technologists may lead or manage teams appropriate to these activities. Some may establish their
own companies or may move into senior management roles in engineering and related enterprises, employing
professional engineers and other specialists where appropriate.
9
ENGINEERING OFFICERS (ASSOCIATES)
The benchmark Stage 1 qualification for Engineering Officers is the two-year Advanced Diploma/
Associate Degree in Engineering, classified at Level 6 (AQF-6) under the Australian Qualifications
Framework.
Engineering Officers focus mainly on practical applications. They may be expert in installing,
testing and monitoring equipment and systems, in the operation and maintenance of advanced
plant, and in managing or supervising tradespeople in these activities. They may be expert in
selecting equipment and components to meet given specifications and in assembling these to
form systems customised to particular projects.
Engineering Officers are often required to be familiar with Standards and Codes of Practice and
to become expert in the interpretation and application of such Standards in a wide variety of
situations. Many develop very extensive experience of practical installations. In fact, they are often
more knowledgeable than a Professional Engineer or Engineering Technologist on detailed aspects
that can contribute very greatly to safety, cost or effectiveness in operation.
In other instances, Engineering Officers may develop high levels of expertise in aspects of design
and development processes. These might include, for example, the use of advanced software to
perform detailed design of structures, mechanical components and systems, manufacturing or
process plants, electrical and electronic equipment, information and communications systems.
Another example might be in the construction of experimental or prototype equipment. Again,
experienced operators in these areas often develop detailed practical knowledge and experience
complementing the broader or more theoretical knowledge of others.
Engineering Officers need a good grounding in engineering science and the principles underlying
their field of expertise to ensure that their knowledge is portable across different applications
and situations. Context-specific training and experience in a particular job are not sufficient to
guarantee generic competency. Given a good knowledge base however, Engineering Officers
may build further on this through high levels of training in particular contexts and in relation to
particular equipment. Aircraft maintenance is an excellent example.
The competencies of Engineering Officers equip them to certify the quality of engineering work
and the condition of equipment and systems in defined circumstances, laid down in recognised
Standards and Codes of Practice. Such certification should be fully acceptable in the public domain
and should not require further endorsement by other practitioners who are perceived to be more
highly qualified.
Engineering Officers may lead or manage teams appropriate to these activities. Some may
establish their own companies or may move into senior management roles in engineering
and other related enterprises, employing Professional Engineers and other specialists where
appropriate.
10
COMPETENCY TERMS
Competency is the ability to perform activities within
an occupation to standards expected and recognised
by employers and the community. Competencies are
expressed in terms of Units and Elements and are
demonstrated through the demonstration of the
Defining Activities. The Unit title describes a particular
area of performance, for example Engineering Practice.
The Elements are the necessary components or activities
which make up the Unit of Competency. Each Element
has a set of Defining Activities which provide a guide
to the level of performance and allow a judgment to be
made on whether the element of competency has been
achieved.
Graduates are Stage 1 Professional Engineers,
Engineering Technologists or Engineering Officers, that
is, they have demonstrated the attainment of essential
educational competencies through the completion of a
recognised tertiary engineering qualification. Graduates
work under guidance and supervision.
Those with Chartered Status or Professional Engineers,
Engineering Technologists or Engineering Officers
(Associates) who have demonstrated Stage 2 competence
will have undertaken broad-based experience. They
have the competencies to work independently and
display leadership in creating and applying new
engineering practices on a regular basis, that is; they
have demonstrated engineering skills and judgment in
addition to educational competencies and can practice in
a competent, independent and ethical manner.
PROFESSIONAL FORMATION
The period during which a graduate engineer gains the
necessary professional engineering competencies in
order to practice in an independent and ethical manner is
known as Professional Formation. Professional Formation
mainly takes place following the completion of a formal
engineering or technology degree or advanced diploma/
associate degree. Engineering experience gained prior
to graduation may be admissible in cases where the
experience meets Stage 2 competency standards.
A minimum period of Professional Formation is not
generally stipulated as the assessment for the award of
Chartered Status is based on demonstrated competencies
rather than a period of time. However, in accordance
with Engineers Australia Bye-Laws and Membership
Regulations, a graduate must have at least three years of
work experience at the level of their related occupational
category to achieve Chartered Status.
The period for Professional Formation is usually
minimised in cases where the enterprise you are working
for has partnered with Engineers Australia to provide its
employees with an approved Professional Development
Program (PDP). Engineers can also join the PDP as
individual participants. Details about the PDP can be
found on the Engineers Australia website at
www.engineersaustralia.org.au
11
PREPARING YOUR ENGINEERING
PRACTICE REPORT
Your Engineering Practice Report (EPR) consists of a
series of written Career Episode Reports (CERs) each
describing experience gained during your Professional
Formation.
A Career Episode Report (CER) is a documented
component of your professional experience. It
indicates the attainment of experience related to
relevant Elements of Competency. A career episode
may be made up of a number of related professional
experiences over a continuous period.
The significance of individual career episodes varies.
A minor career episode may cover a relatively short
period of time (several months) and be advanced to
claim some Elements of Competency. A major career
episode (a large or lengthy project for example)
can be advanced to demonstrate an entire Unit of
Competency.
A collection of narratives relating to the career
episodes forms the basis of your EPR. Each narrative
(report) should emphasise problems identified and the
problem-solving techniques you utilised in overcoming
them.
Full details of the Stage 2 Competencies and the
Standards by which they are measured are given at
Appendix C. Of particular importance are the Standards
(Part 2 of Appendix C). The Standards set the context
against which a competency must be demonstrated
within each occupational category. The notes provide
essential guidance as to how you should interpret and
address the Unit.
There are several steps you should follow when
preparing for the Competency Based Assessment.
Follow the steps closely and contact the Engineers
Australia Accredited Assessor identified at Appendix F if
you have any queries.
PREPARING FOR YOUR COMPETENCY
BASED ASSESSMENT
STEP 1
To be eligible for Chartered Status you must:
•	 be a financial member, or eligible to become a
member, of Engineers Australia in one of the three
engineering occupational categories (for details
of how to apply, refer to the Engineers Australia
website www.engineersaustralia.org.au)
•	 have at least three years of engineering experience
in the relevant occupational category.
STEP 2
Determine in which occupational category you will be
applying for Chartered Status: Chartered Professional
Engineer (CPEng), Chartered Engineering Technologist
(CEngT) or Chartered Engineering Officer (CEngO). To
assist you, please refer to the previous section titled
“Defining the Engineering Team”.
STEP 3
Write the CERs that, when assembled, will form your
EPR based on your professional experience in the
general area of practice in which you are seeking
recognition. Should you be seeking registration on
the NPER/NETR/NEAR, browse through the section
titled “Registration, Areas of Practice, Colleges and
International Agreements”in Appendix B. If you are
seeking recognition in a specific area of practice, you
need to seek further information as explained in
Appendix B. Your report then needs to demonstrate
that you have practised independently in the specific
area.
Reports should emphasise:
•	 your personal contribution and responsibilities
•	 the problems you faced
•	 the solution(s) you found
•	 the engineering judgments you made
•	 the impact your solution(s) and judgments
generated.
ENGINEERING PRACTICE REPORT
12
An example of a Career Episode Report (CER) is shown
in Appendix D. Your CER is to be printed on A4 sheets,
in English, in narrative form and using the first person
singular, and should describe the specific contributions
you have made.
STEP 4
Consult the list of Units and Elements of Competency in
Appendix A and make a selection of the Elements you
believe you have achieved.
Review your selection against the respective Defining
Activities (Appendix C) and ensure that you have
demonstrated most or all of the Defining Activities in
order to claim that you have demonstrated an element of
competence. Please note that only the Elements and not
the Defining Activities are to be noted in the right hand
column.
When writing your CERs you will need to refer to
Appendix C both Part 1 and Part 2. Remember that
your EPR must show that you have demonstrated your
competency in all three Compulsory Units of Competency
(including all seventeen Elements) plus two of the ten
Elective Units of Competency (including the specified
number of Elements).
If you have not demonstrated the requisite Units and
Elements, write further career episodes until you have
satisfied the requirement. Remember that the wording
of each CER should clearly indicate how these Elements
have been demonstrated (refer to the CER example at
Appendix D).
Your EPR can now be formed by linking all your CERs.
STEP 5
Each of your CERs must be verified by a senior
experienced engineer (preferably a Chartered Engineer)
from at least the same occupational category in which
you are seeking Chartered Status. Verifiers must be able
to attest that you have performed the work you have
written about. In some cases this may not be possible
and a Statutory Declaration (refer to the Application Form
in Appendix G) is required in lieu of attestation.
STEP 6
You are now able to complete your application by
providing one original and two copies of the following
documentation:
a)	 Completed Application Form
b)	 A certified passport-style photo
c)	 A certified true copy of your passport bio-data page
or Australian Driver’s Licence (where this is not
available, a certified copy of your Birth Certificate or
Official Identity Document may be acceptable in lieu).
d)	 A verified Curriculum Vitae (CV) covering your
employment experience since completing your first
tertiary qualifications. The CV is to be verified by
a responsible Engineer whose signature must be
accompanied by their printed name, address, email
address, phone number and status or if verified by
a member of Engineers Australia, their membership
number, printed name and signature. The CV
verification should cover at least the last three years
of engineering employment. The following statement
is to be signed by the verifier:
“I verify that this is a true statement of the career
history of (candidate’s name) during the period (date)
to (date).”
If you cannot provide verification of employment for
any of the last three year period, a properly witnessed
Statutory Declaration stating why you have not been
able to have the information verified, what steps you
took to locate the verifier and that the information
contained in your CV is true and correct covering that
period must accompany your application. Refer to
page 5 of the Application Form.
e)	 Details of your Continuing Professional Development
(CPD) for example, formal education and training,
seminars or conferences attended, presentations and
papers and private reading. For further details refer to
the Engineers Australia website at
www.engineersaustralia.org.au
f)	 Your Engineers Australia membership number
(documented on the Application Form). If you
are not a current member of Engineers Australia
and hold accredited Australian engineering
qualifications (typically a four-year professional
engineering qualification, a three-year engineering
technology qualification or a two-year advanced
diploma/associate degree in engineering) you must
provide a certified copy of your degree/diploma
testamur(s). If your qualifications are not accredited
by Engineers Australia or are from a country other
than Australia, a certified copy of your assessment
letter from Engineers Australia indicating that
you have qualifications which meet the academic
requirements to confer recognition as a Stage 1
Engineer must be provided. If you are applying under
a Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) please refer
to our website www.engineersaustralia.org.au under
Membership for further information.
g)	 Payment of the Chartered assessment fee.
Please refer to the latest fee schedule at
www.engineersaustralia.org.au under Membership.
13
STEP 7
Submit all of these documents and your payment
to the Accredited Assessor located in your region
identified at Appendix F.
STEP 8
When your EPR is assessed as satisfactory, you will be
invited to attend a Professional Interview (PI). The PI is
essentially a peer review of the competencies you have
claimed. The PI will be conducted by a panel which
includes Chartered Members of Engineers Australia in
your chosen engineering discipline and area of practice.
The Engineers Australia Accredited Assessor will also be
present or linked by telephone to act as a facilitator and
moderator at the interview.
At the start of the PI you will be asked to make an
uninterrupted fifteen-minute presentation in support
of your application. During the remainder of the
PI you should be prepared to discuss the Defining
Activities pertaining to your selected Elements of
Competency. Questions by the Assessment Panel on
technical aspects of your career are anticipated to
take approximately 30 minutes. This may be extended
depending on the circumstances. The interview is not
expected to exceed 60 minutes.
You should also be prepared to answer questions on the
Engineers Australia Code of Ethics (refer to Appendix
E) and contemporary engineering issues such as the
environment and sustainability. If there are points
that require clarification, you may be requested to
undertake a Technical Assignment at the completion of
your PI.
Unsuccessful applicants will receive counseling and
advice regarding future professional development
requirements they should seek in order to attain
Chartered Status.
Applicants for registration in a specific area of practice
should note that the Assessment Panel has to be
satisfied that you have:
•	 Met the Stage 2 competencies in a general area of
practice; and
•	 Provided evidence of your practice in the specific
area.
You should note that as a practicing engineer in
Australia you are expected to be able to communicate
effectively in the English language. Your competencies
in English will be assessed during the PI and in the
assessment of the EPR.
MATURE EXPERIENCED ENGINEERS
PATHWAY TO CHARTERED STATUS
Mature and more experienced engineering participants
with at least fifteen years of broad-based engineering
experience since graduation and who have been
responsible for substantial work in their occupational
category may demonstrate their acquisition of
competencies by submission of a less voluminous
Statement of Experience.
Potential applicants should download the “Mature
Experienced Engineers Pathway to Chartered Status”
document available at www.engineersaustralia.org.au
and read in conjunction with this Handbook.
Applicant’s attention should be drawn to the Entry
Requirements and Method of Application.
14
APPENDIX A
STAGE 2 COMPETENCY UNITS AND ELEMENTS
COMPULSORY UNITS AND THEIR RESPECTIVE ELEMENTS
For competency demonstration requirements, refer to Step 4 of the previous section Engineering Practice Report.
Fuller details of the Competencies are given in Appendix C (Part 1 and 2).
When applying for Chartered Status and registration on the National Professional Engineers Register (NPER) /
National Engineering Technologists Register (NETR) / National Engineering Associates Register (NEAR) you need to
address the following three Compulsory Units of Competency (UNIT C1, C2, C3). Note that all seventeen [17] Elements
within the Units must be addressed.
UNIT C1	 ENGINEERING PRACTICE	 Your checklist
ELEMENTS:
C1.1 Presents and Develops a Professional Image YES NO
C1.2 Pursues Continuing Professional Development YES NO
C1.3 Integrates Engineering with Other Professional Input YES NO
C1.4 Develops Engineering Solutions YES NO
C1.5 Identifies Constraints on Potential Engineering Solutions YES NO
UNIT C2	 ENGINEERING PLANNING AND DESIGN	 Your checklist
ELEMENTS:
C2.1 Interprets and Scopes Design Requirements YES NO
C2.2 Prepares Concept Proposal and Seeks Advice on Latest Technology YES NO
C2.3 Implements Planning and Design Process YES NO
C2.4 Reviews the Design to Achieve Acceptance YES NO
C2.5 Prepares and Maintains Documentation During the Design Process YES NO
C2.6 Validates Design YES NO
UNIT C3	 SELF MANAGEMENT IN THE ENGINEERING WORKPLACE	 Your checklist
ELEMENTS:
C3.1 Manages Self YES NO
C3.2 Works Effectively with People YES NO
C3.3 Facilitates and Capitalises on Change and Innovation YES NO
C3.4 Plans and Manages Work Priorities and Resources YES NO
C3.5 Maintains Customer Focus and Relationships with Clients/Stakeholders/
Suppliers/Regulators
YES NO
C3.6 Manages Information YES NO
15
Plus
You need to address two of the ten Elective Units and the specified number of Elements stipulated within the
Units. Note that E1A and E1B are mutually exclusive, as are E4A and E4B.
ELECTIVE UNITS AND THEIR RESPECTIVE ELEMENTS
UNIT E1A	 ENGINEERING BUSINESS MANAGEMENT	 Your checklist
ELEMENTS: AT LEAST FIVE ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED FROM THE FOLLOWING:
E1A.1 Contributes to Engineering Business Strategies YES NO
E1A.2 Develops Client Relationships YES NO
E1A.3 Manages the Implementation of Engineering Plans within the Business YES NO
E1A.4 Manages Resources YES NO
E1A.5 Manages People YES NO
E1A.6 Manages Suppliers YES NO
E1A.7 Manages Business Information YES NO
E1A.8 Monitors Engineering Business Performance YES NO
OR
UNIT E1B	 ENGINEERING PROJECT MANAGEMENT	 Your checklist
ELEMENTS: AT LEAST FIVE ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED FROM THE FOLLOWING:
E1B.1 Develops Project Integration YES NO
E1B.2 Scopes the Project YES NO
E1B.3 Manages People YES NO
E1B.4 Manages the Physical Resources within the Project YES NO
E1B.5 Manages Quality, Safety, Environment and Risk YES NO
E1B.6 Manages Cost and Procurement YES NO
E1B.7 Manages Time and Progress YES NO
E1B.8 Finalises the Project YES NO
UNIT E2	 ENGINEERING OPERATIONS	 Your checklist
ELEMENTS: ELEMENT E2.2 AND AT LEAST FOUR OTHER ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED FROM THE FOLLOWING:
E2.1 Plans Operations and Systems YES NO
E2.2 Manages the Process with the Operation/System YES NO
E2.3 Manages the Assets within the Operation/System YES NO
E2.4 Manages People YES NO
E2.5 Measures and Documents Engineering Operation/System YES NO
E2.6 Management of Environmental Performance YES NO
UNIT E3	 MATERIALS/COMPONENTS/SYSTEMS	 Your checklist
ELEMENTS: ELEMENTS E3.1, E3.2 AND AT LEAST TWO OTHER ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED FROM THE
FOLLOWING:
E3.1 Determines Engineering Requirements YES NO
E3.2 Designs/Develops Materials/Components/Systems YES NO
E3.3 Defines Processes to Prepare Materials/Components/Systems YES NO
E3.4 Manages the Uses of Materials/Components/Systems within the Project/
Operation
YES NO
E3.5 Manages the Recovery, Reuse and Disposal of Materials/Components/Systems YES NO
16
UNIT E4A	 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT	 Your checklist
Please note: Applicants for NPER Environmental (general) MUST address this Unit and MUST also respond to the
“Guideline for Environmental Engineering*”.
ELEMENTS: ELEMENTS E4A.1, E4A.2, E4A.3 AND AT LEAST ONE OTHER ELEMENT MUST BE ADDRESSED FROM THE
FOLLOWING:
E4A.1 Determines the Existing Environmental Condition YES NO
E4A.2 Establishes Stakeholders’Expectations YES NO
E4A.3 Reviews Existing Environmental Conditions Against Stakeholders’Expectations YES NO
E4A.4 Develops and Ranks Strategies to Achieve Sustainable Development YES NO
E4A.5 Implements, Monitors and Evaluates Strategies YES NO
*The “Guideline for Environmental Engineering”can be located on the National Engineering Registration Board
website at www.engineersaustralia.org.au/nerb under Areas of Practice – General Areas – Environmental Engineering.
OR
UNIT E4B	 INVESTIGATION AND REPORTING	 Your checklist
ELEMENTS: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED
E4B.1 Responds to/Identifies Problems YES NO
E4B.2 Plans the Investigation YES NO
E4B.3 Carries out the Investigation YES NO
E4B.4 Draws Conclusions and Makes Recommendations YES NO
UNIT E5	 RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AND COMMERCIALISATION	 Your checklist
ELEMENTS: ELEMENT E5.1, E5.2, E5.3, E5.4 AND AT LEAST ONE OTHER ELEMENT MUST BE ADDRESSED FROM THE
FOLLOWING:
E5.1 Identifies Opportunities for New or Improved Processes and/or Products YES NO
E5.2 Identifies the Resources Required for the R&D YES NO
E5.3 Initiates Concept Development YES NO
E5.4 Gains Commitment to the R&D Proposal YES NO
E5.5 Ensures Research is Undertaken YES NO
E5.6 Collaborates in the Commercialisation of Research Outcomes YES NO
UNIT E6	 SOURCE AND ESTIMATE MATERIALS	 Your checklist
ELEMENTS: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED
E6.1 Defines Requirements and Sources for Materials YES NO
E6.2 Estimates Materials YES NO
E6.3 Procures Materials/Resources YES NO
E6.4 Prepares Materials/Components/Systems for use in the Project/Operation YES NO
UNIT E7	 CHANGE AND TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT	 Your checklist
ELEMENTS: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED
E7.1 Participates in Planning the Introduction of Technical Change YES NO
E7.2 Develops Technically Creative and Flexible Approaches and Solutions YES NO
E7.3 Manages Emerging Technical Challenges and Opportunities YES NO
UNIT E8	 TECHNICAL SALES AND PROMOTION	 Your checklist
ELEMENTS: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED
E8.1 Identifies Sales Opportunities YES NO
E8.2 Applies Product Knowledge to Client Requirements YES NO
E8.3 Promotes Technical Capability of the Product/System YES NO
E8.4 Seeks Client Feedback YES NO
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APPENDIX B
REGISTRATION, AREAS OF PRACTICE, COLLEGES, AND INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS
INTRODUCTION
Public Safety is protected when only competent practitioners are registered to provide engineering services
in critical areas. Registered practitioners will be engaged to provide services in such areas only if stipulated by
regulation or demanded by the market.
Information imbalance is reduced when registration standards are made available. Published information must
express the observable functions that are necessary to practise competently in each area of the register in terms of
competency-based eligibility criteria.
In some instances, Regulatory Schemes are used when governments find a need to place aspects of practice
under the law. This is usually because the government has assessed that practice by unqualified or inadequately
experienced or uninsured practitioners in such areas puts the community at a greater risk than the constraints on
competition associated with registration.
The National Professional Engineers Register (NPER) was launched in 1994, the National Engineering Technologists
Register (NETR) was introduced in 1996 and the National Engineering Associates Register (NEAR) was launched in
2008. Engineers Australia administers the three National Engineering Registers on advice from a board established
to ensure the registers operate with integrity and in the public interest at no cost to the government, with a
particular emphasis on public safety and the risks associated with information imbalance in an engineer-client
relationship.
NATIONAL ENGINEERING REGISTRATION BOARD
The National Engineering Registration Board (the Board) was established jointly by Engineers Australia, the
Association of Professional Engineers, Scientists and Managers, Australia (APESMA) and Consult Australia
(formerly ACEA). The Board, representing State and Territory Governments, Community Organisations and
Professional Associations, ensures that national registers are administered in the public interest. The Board, which
includes a nominated Engineering Technologist and Engineering Associate, supervises the administration of the
registers. Engineers Australia administers NPER, NETR and NEAR as the service provider to the Board.
REGULATORY SCHEMES
The Engineers Australia Professional Standards Scheme is a limitation of liability scheme approved under the
professional standards legislation of each State and Territory. The scheme is designed to improve the occupational
standards of the profession, protect consumers and put a cap on the amount of damages a court can award
against members covered by the scheme in legal actions for economic loss or property damage arising from
anything they did or did not do in carrying out their occupation.
Engineers Australia is an approved assessment entity under the Professional Engineers Act 2002(QLD), approved to
assess qualifications and competencies under Part 2 of the Act for persons wishing to apply for registration as a
Registered Professional Engineer of Queensland (RPEQ). Registration on NPER or CPEng provides sufficient evidence
for a successful assessment.
Registration on NPER also provides evidence of technical competence required for accreditation as a certifier under
the Building Professionals Act 2005 (NSW).
18
REGISTRATION STANDARDS
Assessment against Stage 2 Competency Standards
(Appendix C Part 2) is necessarily related to the
occupational roles in which the competencies have been
exercised, and to the scope offered by those roles – but
is not necessarily limited to them. A person employed in
one occupational group may well demonstrate some of
the attributes of another group; and different people may
perform the same role in different ways, for example, in
the degree of initiative shown.
The integrity of the registration system is sustained
where applicants expect to be assessed against objective
competency standards that take account of their
knowledge and understanding as well as their workplace
activities in a way that is both visible and defensible.
REGISTRATION OBLIGATIONS
Members of Engineers Australia and non-members who
register on NPER/NETR/NEAR undertake to be bound by
Engineers Australia’s Code of Ethics and the Disciplinary
Regulations that underpin it. All registrants are required
to practise only within the limits of their competence
and to maintain records of their Continuing Professional
Development (CPD) for audit purposes.
Chartered members and registered non-members, at
the time of application, undertake to record a minimum
of 150 hours of CPD activities in any three-year period.
Applicants also must certify that they have spent a total
of at least one year during the last three years engaged
in independent practice or working as an employee
under general direction or have been enrolled in a formal
postgraduate course directly related to their areas of
practice. Details of acceptable CPD activities, minimum
requirements and certain limitations can be found on the
Engineers Australia website at www.engineersaustralia.
org.au/yourcpdaudit.
AREAS OF PRACTICE
Twelve general areas of practice are available for
registration on the National Engineering Registers:
Aerospace Engineering, Biomedical Engineering,
Building Services Engineering, Chemical Engineering,
Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Environmental
Engineering, Information, Telecommunications,
Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering,
Structural Engineering, Naval Architecture and
Management.
Five specific areas of practice are currently available to
practitioners who are registered in an appropriate general
area of practice on a National Engineering Register:
Fire Safety Engineering, Heritage and Conservation
Engineering, In-service Inspection of Amusement Rides
and Devices, Pressure Equipment Design Verification and
Subdivisional Geotechnics.
Information on areas of practice can be found at
www.nerb.org.au/areas-of-practice.
CURRENT GENERAL AREAS OF PRACTICE
The following descriptions are provided to help you
choose your general area of practice on a national
Engineering Register. For further information and
guidelines on eligibility criteria, applicants should visit
www.nerb.org.au/areas-of-practice.
AEROSPACE ENGINEERING
Aerospace Engineering is concerned with aerodynamics
and performance, aircraft stores, airports and ground
systems, airways systems, cabin environment, cockpit
ergonomics, communications systems, computer systems
and avionics, crashworthiness, electrical systems,
electronic warfare, environmental effects, fire safety and
control, flight management systems, flight simulators,
flight navigation systems noise and acoustic effects,
propulsions systems, radar systems, risk management,
satellite systems, software, structures, test flight control,
tracking systems, vehicle dynamics and vehicle launch
and recovery.
BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING
Biomedical Engineering is concerned with research,
design, development, evaluation, manufacture,
installation, operation, maintenance, management and
control of biomedical devices, facilities and equipment
designed to support and enhance human life and help
individuals to overcome physical disabilities. It is also
concerned with the planning and assessment of medical
procedures and the development of related data handling
facilities. Applicants must have significant training in
the life sciences, typically 80 hours of formal education
or equivalent, and hold or have held a position of
professional responsibility in biomedical engineering.
BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERING
Building Services Engineering is concerned with aspects
of the built environment, involving air conditioning
and mechanical ventilation, electrical light and power,
fire services, Fire Safety Engineering, water and waste
services, data and communications, security and access
control, vertical transportation, acoustics in buildings and
energy management.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Chemical Engineering is concerned with research,
teaching, design, development, economics, manufacture,
installation, operation, sales, maintenance and
management of commercial scale chemical plants and
process systems, industrial processing and fabrication of
products undergoing chemical and/or physical changes
being applied to materials for construction, process
systems and equipment for instrumentation and control,
and protection of the environment. Applicants must
have experience in the safety aspects of design and/or
operations. In addition, they must have experience in
two of the following functions involving process systems
and equipment: design, evaluation, operation, materials
selection and fabrication.
19
CIVIL ENGINEERING
Civil Engineering is concerned with materials such as
steel, concrete, timber, earth and rock, and with their
application in the research, design, development,
manufacture, construction, operation, maintenance and
management of hydraulic, structural, environmental
and systems aspects of infrastructure works and services
such as water, sewerage, transport, urban development
and municipal services, and with building and
construction for other infrastructure industries.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Electrical Engineering is concerned with research, design,
development, manufacture, installation, operation,
maintenance and management of equipment, plant and
systems within the electrical, electronic, communication
and computers systems areas being applied to electrical
power generation, transmission, distribution and
utilization, manufacture, instrumentation and control
in industry, communications networks, electronic plant
and equipment, integration and control of computer
systems.
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
Environmental Engineering is concerned with water and
waste water treatment and environmental management
(including application or re-use and recycling), waste
management (including ecoefficiency and cleaner
production concepts, and life cycle assessment),
surface and ground water system environmental
management (including water quality management),
contaminated land assessment and remediation,
natural resource management, environment protection,
management and pollution control, environmental
management system design (including environmental
management planning and auditing), environmental
impact assessments and environmental information
systems, natural systems accounting (including
economic evaluation), social impact analysis, community
consultation and dispute resolution, sustainable
assessment and management, and environmental policy
formulation.
INFORMATION, TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND
ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING
Information, Telecommunications and Electronics
Engineering is concerned with communications and
telecommunications systems and engineering, computer
systems engineering, software engineering, electronics
engineering, internet, microelectronics and optical fibre
technology.
MANAGEMENT
This category is for practitioners who undertake
functions recognised as being managerial rather than
technical in content. Applicants seeking registration
under the management category would be expected
to be undertaking activities which call upon their
engineering qualifications and experience.
Such managerial activities might typically include
general management in an engineering environment,
policy development, quality assurance and total
quality management, design and delivery of training
programs, marketing of engineering products or services,
financial or human resource management. You will
not normally be able to register in the management
category unless you previously have gained sufficient
experience in an engineering discipline and have met
the requirements for registration in this engineering
discipline. Subsequent to this experience you must have
acquired appropriate skills and knowledge in general
management.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Mechanical Engineering is concerned with design,
development, research, evaluation, manufacture,
installation, testing, operation, maintenance and
management of machines, mechanical and mechatronic
systems, automated systems and robotic devices,
thermodynamic and combustion systems, fluid and
thermal energy systems, materials and manufacturing
equipment and process plant and materials handling
systems. This is applied to manufacturing, land, sea
and air transportation, electricity generation, mining,
minerals and metals processing, food, agricultural and
forest products processing, thermal and environmental
control systems in buildings and industry and
refrigeration and air conditioning systems. Applicants
must have experience in the safety aspects of design
and/or operation of machines, plant, systems or
processes and with noise, airborne and waterborne
emission controls to reduce environmental impact.
NAVAL ARCHITECTURE
Naval Architecture is multidisciplinary in nature but,
at its simplest: A Naval Architect is a Ship Designer.
To expand on this: A Naval Architect is a Professional
Engineer who is responsible for the safe design and
specification of ships, boats and marine structure, both
civil and military, including merchant ships (cargo and
passenger), warships, submarines and underwater
vehicles, offshore structures (fixed and floating), high
speed craft, workboats and pleasure craft. The Naval
Architect can also be involved in, or manage, the
construction, repair/refit or operation of such ships/
marine structures.
STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING
Structural Engineering is concerned with research,
planning, design, construction, inspection, monitoring,
maintenance, rehabilitation and demolition of
permanent and temporary structures and structural
systems and their components and with associated
technical, economic, environmental, aesthetic and
social aspects. Structures might include buildings,
bridges, in-ground structures, footings, frameworks and
space frames, including those for motor vehicles, space
vehicles, ships, aeroplanes and cranes, composed of
any structural material including composites and novel
materials.
20
SPECIFIC AREAS OF PRACTICE
If you also require registration in a specific area of
practice, you may apply for it concurrently with your
application for Chartered Status. However, you should
note that the evidence of competency you offer
in support of your application would then need to
demonstrate that you have practiced independently
in the specific area and, in some cases, that you have
undertaken certain required professional development
activities. For further information applicants should refer
to www.nerb.org.au/areas-of-practice.
Alternatively, please contact an Engineers Australia office
for this information to be mailed to you.
THE ENGINEERING REGISTRATION SYSTEM
GENERAL
A registration system that distinguishes areas of
engineering service and lists registered practitioners
provides a ready and reliable mean to confirm a
practitioner’s competence. Registration enables
government, industry and individual consumers to
engage the appropriate professional person or team to
perform the required engineering services.
There are three occupational categories in the
engineering work force – Professional Engineer,
Engineering Technologist and Engineering Officer
(Associate). Members in these categories cooperate
in various ways to perform engineering services. Their
activities and competencies are often closely inter-related
and it is difficult, and sometimes artificial, to say where
the responsibilities of one occupational category end and
those of another begin. There are activities that could be
undertaken in different circumstances by any member
of the engineering team. Other activities are clearly the
province of one occupational category and not of another
– for example, the province of a Professional Engineer
but not an Engineering Associate, or vice versa. This
distinction will often be determined by the standard to
which competency has been demonstrated against the
Australian Engineering Competency Standards Stage 2.
Some features of engineering are common to all three
categories. All engineering is about the application of a
distinctive body of knowledge, based on mathematics,
science and technology. Engineering practice is integrated
with business opportunity and risk management. Practice
continually evolves in the light of new theories, new
evidence and new experience, and specializes to a greater
or lesser extent in particular fields of application.
All registered engineering professionals observe
a common Code of Ethics, undertake to accept
responsibility for outcomes only within their area of
competence and specifically commit to keeping up-to-
date through continuing professional development to
support their engagement in delivering engineering
services. They deliver engineering outcomes that
minimise adverse social, economic and environmental
consequences, with due regard for the safety, health and
welfare of the community.
The full range of engineering services demands a broad
spectrum of knowledge, skills and expertise from
the engineering team which comprises Professional
Engineers, Engineering Technologist and Engineering
Associates. The national engineering registration system
provides guidance on the scope of practice within
its three occupational categories on the basis of the
following distinguishing attributes.
DISTINGUISHING ATTRIBUTES
PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS
Professional Engineers apply their lifelong learning,
critical perception and engineering judgment to the
performance of engineering services. They challenge
current thinking and conceptualise alternative
approaches, often engaging in research and development
of new engineering principles, technologies and
materials. Engineers apply their analytical skills and well
developed grasp of scientific principles and engineering
theory to design original and novel solutions to complex
problems. Their disciplined and systematic approach to
innovation and creativity, comprehension of risks and
benefits and informed professional judgment enables
them to select optimal solutions, justify and defend the
selection to colleagues, clients and the community.
Registered Professional Engineers can be expected to
comprehend complexity, function independently and
display leadership within multi-disciplinary and cross-
cultural teams. Within their engineering discipline, they
will optimise costs and benefits to clients and community
within identified constraints, while achieving desired
outcomes ethically, and within the context of a safe
and sustainable environment. They accept ultimate
responsibility for the selection and application of design
tools, implementation strategies and overall integration
and functionality of engineering projects and programs.
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGISTS
Engineering Technologists exercise ingenuity,
originality and understanding in adapting and applying
technologies, developing related new technologies or
applying scientific knowledge within their specialised
technical environment. Their education, expertise and
analytical skills equip them with a robust understanding
of the theoretical and practical application of engineering
and technical principles. Within their branch of
technology, they contribute to the improvement of
standards and codes of practice, and the adaptation of
established technologies to new situations.
Registered Engineering Technologists can be expected
to determine interactions between a technology and the
system in which it operates, recognise and take account
of its suitability and manage associated technical risks.
21
Technologists accept responsibility for the detailed
technological requirements of their engineering
services with due regard to the fundamental properties
and limitations of components and systems involved.
They may lead and manage teams engaged in the
inspection, approval and certification of designs, tests,
installations and reliable operations. They identify
problematic circumstances, take remedial action and
keep colleagues, clients and community informed,
while ensuring performance-based criteria are satisfied
within a safe and sustainable environment.
ENGINEERING OFFICERS (ASSOCIATES)
Engineering Associates apply their detailed knowledge
of standards and codes of practice to selecting,
specifying, installing, commissioning, monitoring,
maintaining, repairing and modifying complex assets
such as structures, plant, equipment, components
and systems. Their education, training and experience
equip them with the necessary theoretical knowledge
and analytical skills for testing, fault diagnosis and
understanding the limitations of complex assets in
familiar operating situations.
Registered Engineering Associates can be expected
to exercise engineering judgment within the scope of
accepted standards and codes of practice to the design,
inspection, certification, safe operation and cost-
effectiveness of complex assets. They may supervise
tradespeople, lead and manage teams and utilise
advanced software and design aids to achieve practical
and reliable designs, installations and operations of
complex assets.
INTERNATIONAL ARRANGEMENTS
Becoming a Chartered Member of Engineers Australia
may allow you to join overseas institutions without
having to undertake further examination or interview.
Engineers Australia has negotiated mutual recognition
agreements with numerous overseas professional
associations that provide reciprocal membership.
This information can be found at
www.engineersaustralia.org.au
Engineers Australia is part of two multilateral
international registers, the APEC Engineer Register
and the EMF International Recognition agreement for
Professional Engineers – IntPE (Aus).
The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Engineer
Register is an initiative of the Commonwealth
Government and Engineers Australia to facilitate cross
border mobility for Professional Engineers in the APEC
region. An APEC Engineer Register has been established
in Australia, Canada, Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong China,
Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, the
Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, the United States of
America and Russia.
The Engineers Mobility Forum (EMF) has constituted an
International Recognition Agreement for Professional
Engineers. The International Register of Professional
Engineers is operated in Australia, Canada, Chinese
Taipei, Hong Kong China, India, Ireland, Japan, Korea,
Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore, Sri Lanka, South
Africa, the UK and the USA. Engineers registered on the
International Register may use the postnominal IntPE
(Aus).
A person who is registered on the National Professional
Engineers Register (NPER) has already met, to a
significant extent, the requirements for enrolment
on the APEC Engineer Register or on the IntPE (Aus)
Register. The APEC Handbook and Application Form
can be found at www.nerb.org.au >Registers >
International.
COLLEGES
Colleges represent the learned-society function
of Engineers Australia. They are responsible for
maintaining, extending and promoting the body of
knowledge, formulating standards for accrediting
university degree programs and practice competencies
for admission to Chartered Status and Registration,
providing expert members of accreditation and
assessment panels, promoting discipline-specific
continuing professional development, and mentoring
the development of graduate engineers.
There are currently eight Colleges of Engineers
Australia: Biomedical, Chemical, Civil, Electrical,
Environmental, Information Telecommunications and
Electronics, Mechanical and Structural, which together
broadly cover all areas of practice in engineering.
When you apply for Chartered Status (CPEng, CEngT
or CEngO), you should also nominate a College. This
would indicate that you would be seeking Chartered
Membership of this College, which covers your area
of engineering practice. For example, you may have
studied Mechanical Engineering but your work-
related competencies could have been in Structural
Engineering. Your nominated College would therefore
be “Structural”. You are able to nominate more than one
College, however, your EPR must show that you have
gained experience in areas of practice covered by the
College(s) you nominate.
22
APPENDIX C
PART 1 - STAGE 2 COMPETENCY UNITS, ELEMENTS AND DEFINING ACTIVITIES
UNIT C1: Engineering Practice COMPULSORY
DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to apply a professional approach to a specific area
of engineering practice.
Element Defining Activities
C1.1 Presents and develops a
professional image
a.	Practises in a field of engineering, in accordance with the code of ethics, as a
significant part of normal work duties
b.	Demonstrates use of appropriate engineering techniques and tools
c.	Produces outcomes that require innovative thought and intellectual rigour
d.	Publishes the outcomes of innovation in reports or professional papers
e.	Achieves recognition for engineering expertise from colleagues and clients
f.	 Identifies opportunities to solve problems through applying engineering
knowledge
g.	Demonstrates an awareness of environmental/community/political issues
that would benefit from engineering input
C1.2 Pursues continuing professional
development
a.	Reviews own strengths and determines areas for development
b.	Plans for further professional development
c.	Undertakes engineering professional development activities
d.	Improves non engineering knowledge and skills to assist in achieving
engineering outcomes
C1.3 Integrates engineering with
other professional input
a.	Interacts with appropriate professionals and specialists to achieve agreed
outcomes and develop broader knowledge
b.	Seeks a range of information sources to develop and strengthen present
engineering focus
c.	Challenges current practices to identify opportunities for improvement
through a multi-disciplined, inter-cultural approach
C1.4 Develops engineering solutions a.	Identifies and proposes options to achieve engineering solutions
b.	Produces new concepts/design/solutions/methods
c.	Demonstrates the achievement of improvements in processes and
outcomes
d.	Plans and manages the development of solutions
e.	Proposes means of testing, measuring and evaluating solutions
f.	 Develops and applies new engineering practices on a regular basis
C1.5 Identifies constraints on
potential engineering solutions
a.	Identifies the interrelationship of social, physical, environmental, political,
financial and cultural issues with the proposed engineering solutions
b.	Identifies professional risks, statutory responsibilities and liabilities
c.	Implements Occupational Health and Safety and other statutory
requirements
d.	Identifies hazards and consequent risks, and initiates appropriate safety
and disaster management measures
e.	Identifies long term environmental and sustainability issues associated
with engineering activities
NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
23
UNIT C2: Engineering Planning and Design COMPULSORY
DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to be involved in the interpretation of
requirements, apply engineering principles, conceptualise options and apply creativity to development of plans
and designs that meet the client’s requirements.
Element Defining Activities
C2.1 Interprets and scopes design
requirements
a.	Negotiates and interprets the client’s requirements
b.	Brings to the client’s attention the implications of sustainability and
options for an improved environmental outcome
c.	Documents the requirements, negotiates and obtains agreement on
acceptance criteria
d.	Analyses client requirements for the design criteria to ensure that all
appropriate specification are included in the design requirements
e.	Reviews the design requirements by considering the impact of the
plan/design of all development and implementation factors, including
constraints and risks
f.	 Selects and applies engineering standards and design specifications
to write functional specifications which meet the requirements
g.	Defines and agrees the acceptance criteria with the client
C2.2 Prepares concept proposal and
seeks advice on latest technology
a.	Applies innovative approaches to the development of possible design
concepts, responding to imperatives such as sustainability
b.	Investigates and analyses the possible design concepts to achieve the
design requirements
c.	Seeks advice from appropriate personnel and sources where the
concept proposal has non standard engineering requirements
d.	Collaborates with the client to adapt the plan/design brief/concept to
improve outcomes and overcome possible problems
e.	Advises the client of the likely impacts on the community
f.	 Seeks advice on the latest technologies
C2.3 Implements planning and
design process
a.	Arranges design tasks to meet the agreed outcomes and cost
structure
b.	Analyses and selects resources/processes/systems to develop the plan
or design
c.	Develops and checks the design solution using the engineering
specification
d.	Creates (when appropriate) a demonstration model of the design
e.	Establishes documentation management process
C2.4 Reviews the design to achieve
acceptance
a.	Reviews the design to ensure that user requirements are met
b.	Informs the user of the likely impact on the user’s lifestyle
c.	Incorporates corrections and makes improvements to the design
ensuring social responsibilities, such as sustainability, are met
d.	Reviews the design with the client to gain documented acceptance
C2.5 Prepares and maintains
documentation during the design
process
a.	Ensures that the supporting documentation required to implement
the design is accurate, concise, complete and clear
b.	Ensures that the designed item is identified by agreed design
documentation/records
c.	Applies the agreed documentation control process when making
changes to the design
d.	Ensures that the documentation for the design remains accurate and
current during the design development
C2.6 Validates design a.	Prepares and implements plans to verify that completed physical work
meets clients’requirements
b.	Develops periodic test schedules to monitor performance and enable
others to take any corrective action necessary
c.	Seeks feedback from the commissioning process to facilitate
corrective actions or improvements
d.	Evaluates the performance of the design outcome in the user’s
environment using appropriate tools
e.	Evaluates community reaction to the design outcome
NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
24
UNIT C3: Self-Management in the Engineering Workplace COMPULSORY
DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to perform work competently, making judgments
about work priorities and information requirements to achieve effective working relationships and engineering
outcomes.
Element Defining Activities
C3.1 Manages self a.	Manages own time and own processes
b.	Exercises initiative in the workplace
c.	Completes tasks in a competent and timely manner
d.	Demonstrates professional ethics as the opportunity occurs
e.	Copes with change
C3.2 Works effectively with people a.	Communicates effectively with others
b.	Recognises the value of cultural diversity and applies appropriate workplace
practices for a viable workplace ecology
c.	Develops and maintains trust and confidence of colleagues, clients and
suppliers through competent performance
d.	Seeks and values input from internal and external sources to enhance
communication
e.	Mentors others in specific areas of engineering focus
f.	 Builds and maintains network relationships that value and sustain a team
ethic
C3.3 Facilitates and capiltalises on
change and innovation
a.	Initiates opportunities to introduce change
b.	Works with others to introduce change
c.	Develops creative and flexible approaches and solutions
d.	Manages emerging challenges and opportunities
e.	Manages in a manner to advance sustainability
C3.4 Plans and manages work
priorities and resources
a.	Prioritises competing demands to achieve personal, team and the
organisation’s goals and objectives
b.	Prepares, monitors and reviews work plans, programs and budgets
c.	Plans resource use to achieve profit/productivity/sustainability/
environmental impact minimisation targets
C3.5 Maintains customer focus
and relationships with clients/
stakeholders/suppliers/regulators
a.	Identifies client needs
b.	Works in collaborative relationships with clients/suppliers in the planning
and implementation of the project
c.	Demonstrates commercial awareness
d.	Manages the procurement process
e.	Negotiates to ensure that available capability meets requirements
f.	 Provides regular and complete progress reports
C3.6 Manages information a.	Locates and reviews relevant information
b.	Applies relevant legislation, statutory requirements and standards
c.	Manages information relating to insurances, indemnities, and commercial
instruments
d.	Documents processes and outcomes
e.	Analyses information
NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
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UNIT E1A: Engineering Business Management ELECTIVE
DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to contribute to business strategies through
the provision of specialist engineering knowledge and experience.
Element Defining Activities
E1A.1 Contributes to
engineering business
strategies
a.	Provides engineering analysis to contribute to the development of strategic
plans and sustainability
b.	Integrates engineering objectives into business planning
c.	Seeks emergent business opportunities based upon engineering initiatives
to create opportunities
d.	Works with others to develop engineering performance targets and financial
plans
e.	Provides advice on engineering related costs and risks
f.	 Implements processes to monitor and adjust team performance within the
organisation’s continuous improvement policies
g.	Undertakes risk assessment within organisational guidelines
h.	Develops quality plans for engineering operations
i.	 Applies whole of life costing
E1A.2 Develops client
relationships
a.	Plans to meet internal and external clients’engineering requirements
b.	Ensures delivery of quality engineering products and services
c.	Seeks client feedback on the delivery of engineering products and services
d.	Monitors, adjusts and reports on the client service received
e.	Assists customers to identify sustainable options and implications
E1A.3 Manages the
implementation of
engineering plans within the
business
a.	Allocates roles and responsibilities to staff to achieve engineering plans
b.	Provides engineering leadership
c.	Manages performance and standards
d.	Contributes to the solution of engineering problems
e.	Monitors strategic engineering plans, goals and targets
f.	 Manages costs
g.	Manages safety and quality
h.	Manages environmental issues
i.	 Manages risks and contingencies
E1A.4 Manages resources a.	Implements resources management plans
b.	Procures resources
c.	Manages asset maintenance
d.	Manages disposal, waste management and recycling plans
e.	Provides advice on engineering costs
f.	 Contributes to the innovative management of resources
E1A.5 Manages people a.	Implements people management plans
b.	Monitors team and individual performance targets
c.	Participates in the selection of staff
d.	Ensures the provision of skills and competencies requested to meet business
targets
e.	Manages the workplace culture so that staff work in a continual learning
environment
f.	 Ensures the adherence to ethical, OH&S and quality standards
g.	Provides performance feedback
E1A.6 Manages suppliers a.	Participates supplier selection
b.	Prepares documents for engagement of suppliers
c.	Plans and implements monitoring of suppliers
E1A.7 Manages business
information
a.	Indentifies and complies with all statutory reporting requirements
b.	Uses management information systems effectively to store and retrieve data
for decision making
c.	Prepares and presents business plans/budgets in accordance with the
organisation’s guidelines and requirements
E1A.8 Monitors engineering
business performance
a.	Establishes monitoring processes and feedback systems to ensure agreed
targets are met
b.	Establishes monitoring and reporting processes to ensure statutory
requirements are met
c.	Establishes and monitors processes so that continuous improvement is
achieved at all levels of the business
NOTE: AT LEAST FIVE ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally 5 out of 8 elements are
demonstrated and claimed in one CER to fulfill the essential requirement of this Unit.
26
OR
UNIT E1B: Engineering Project Management ELECTIVE
DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to scope and manage engineering projects
within a program of work ensuring that time, cost and quality are managed effectively and that progress is
maintained to achieve the outcomes within and across a number of projects.
Element Defining Activities
E1B.1 Develops project integration a.	Integrates the project with the business direction
b.	Manages communication across the project with all stakeholders
c.	Designs/agrees upon the documentation system across the project
d.	Manages integration of all aspects of project design
e.	Plans and manages the integration of the transition of each stage of the
project cycle
f.	 Relates the project to community aspirations
g.	Develops the Project Plan
E1B.2 Scopes the project a.	Collaborates with the clients/project owners and the team to define
project deliverables for various phases within the project budget
b.	Identifies measurable outcomes to evaluate the project on completion
c.	Develops project scope and feasibility accessing other areas of expertise
as required
d.	Defines parameters for the environmental management plan
e.	Manages the relation between project management and environmental
management
E1B.3 Manages people a.	Implements people management plans
b.	Monitors team and individual performance targets
c.	Ensures that the project team has adequate skills and resources to
achieve the project outcomes
d.	Participates in the selection of staff
e.	Manages the workplace culture so that staff work in a continual learning
environment
f.	 Discusses project scope and project objectives with those involved in the
project
g.	Delegates the achievement of outcomes to ensure cost, time and
material resources are appropriately allocated and applied
h.	Ensures the adherence to ethical, environmental, OH&S and quality
standards
i.	 Provides performance feedback
j.	 Informs project members of the relationship of the project to other
program outcomes
E1B.4 Manages the physical
resources within the project
a.	Develops resource, material conservation, recovery and waste
management plans
b.	Defines project resource performance parameters in consultation with
others
c.	Develops strategies to maintain the effective performance of the
resources
d.	Initiates training programs for staff to monitor resource condition
e.	Diagnoses problems and identifies requirements for appropriate testing
f.	 Establishes environmental and sustainability criteria for procurement of
materials, equipment and services
E1B.5 Manages quality, safety,
environment and risk
a.	Initiating a quality program to ensure that outcomes are achieved to the
required standard of quality specified in the contract
b.	Manages the reporting and documentation of quality and controls non-
conformances
c.	Establishes plans for management of OH&S and Environmental Control
d.	Manages hazard identification and the prevention of accidents
e.	Manages remedial action and reporting when accidents occur
f.	 Identifies risks, their potential impacts, and produces a risk
minimisation plan
27
E1B.6 Manages cost and
procurement
a.	Determines procurement requirements for the project
b.	Ensures that the procurement process conforms with all probity
requirements
c.	Determines project budget and monitors and controls project costs
d.	Monitors the production of deliverables to ensure that cost trend
deviations from budget are quickly identified and remedied
e.	Specifies contract requirements to achieve the project outcomes
f.	 Reviews requested variations against contract terms and conditions,
the agreed project outcomes and variations in project requirements or
conditions
g.	Reviews and approves matters during any defects and liability periods
E1B.7 Manages time and progress a.	Determines and implements project programs
b.	Monitors project progress against programs and initiates remedial action
if necessary
c.	Identifies and manages potential areas of conflict at the work site and
between stakeholders, customers and regulators
d.	Monitors contracts against outcomes
e.	Keeps accurate records on all aspects of project progress including
environmental conditions and performance reporting
f.	 Communicates on project progress to the project team, clients,
stakeholders and regulators
E1B.8 Finalises the project a.	Reviews and documents the project outcomes against the project
requirements
b.	Establishes the acceptance criteria for the project in consultation with
the client
c.	Plans the handover of the project
NOTE: AT LEAST FIVE ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally 5 out of 8 elements are
demonstrated and claimed in one CER to fulfill the essential requirement of this Unit.
28
UNIT E2: Engineering Operations ELECTIVE
DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to manage or coordinate ongoing engineering
operations and make decisions to optimise the performance of the plant/system in a dynamic environment.
Element Defining Activities
E2.1 Plans operations and systems a.	Liaises with design, development and other related groups to develop the
plant/system operational plan
b.	Takes a whole of life perspective when identifying future requirements and
possible impacts on the plant/system/operation
c.	Confirms that the goal of the operation meets the organisation’s objectives
d.	Plans to optimise the flexibility and productivity of the operation
e.	Communicates engineering requirements and implications for financial
planning
f.	 Communicates the plan for the operation/plant/system to those involved
in implementation or adaptation
E2.2 Manages the process within the
operation/system
a.	Specifies, procures and allocates resources required to carry out the
processes
b.	Regulates process/system to control variation
c.	Implements logistics plan to ensure spares and parts are available
d.	Initiates corrective action to reduce variation and operational faults in the
process or system
e.	Monitors processes and modifies them to achieve optimum outcomes
f.	 Analyses the relative value of modifications to the system/process
g.	Advocates improvements to the operation to commercial managers and
other stakeholders
h.	Manages sustainable environmental practices during the operation of the
process/system
E2.3 Manages the assets within the
operation/system
a.	Defines asset performance parameters in consultation with others
b.	Develops maintenance strategies and maintenance implementation plans
c.	Prepares and manages whole of life costing
d.	Trains staff to implement condition monitoring
e.	Diagnoses faults and identifies requirements for appropriate technical
testing
f.	 Develops logistics and costings for the resources acquisition required to
support the maintenance plan
g.	Plans for and implements the decommissioning and disposal of assets
h.	Develops an energy and resource minimisation plan
E2.4 Manages people a.	Ensures that the staff are trained in the operation of the process/system
b.	Briefs and coordinates work teams to operate the process/system
c.	Provides system/plant/operational procedures
d.	Reviews performance and competency development of operational teams
e.	Collaborates with and guides work teams to optimise the process/system
f.	 Guides work teams to implement all OH&S practices
E2.5 Measures and documents
engineering operation/system
a.	Reviews outcomes of the process in terms of quality, cost and time against
the operational plan
b.	Analyses productivity to determine where improvements can be made
c.	Develops system or work procedures required to operate and improve the
process
E2.6 Manages environmental
performance
a.	Conducts regular environmental audits of processes/procedures and
systems
b.	Devises energy demand management plan and monitoring
c.	Devises waste management plan and monitoring
d.	Devises water conservation plan and monitoring
e.	Devises materials conservation plan and monitoring
f.	 Monitors and manages workplace environmental conditions and risks
g.	Devises environmental reporting structure and process
NOTE: ELEMENT E2.2 AND AT LEAST FOUR OTHER ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
29
UNIT E3: Materials/Components/Systems ELECTIVE
DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to select safe and sustainable materials,
components and systems which are a part of solutions to engineering problems and meet client and community
expectations.
Element Defining Activities
E3.1 Determines engineering
requirements
a.	Determines fundamental project/operation parameters in consultation
with the client
b.	Considers the characteristics of specific projects/operations with regard
to materials, components and system requirements
c.	Determines and evaluates client and community expectations of the
materials/components/systems used
d.	Identifies and evaluates factors affecting the selection of materials/
component/ systems including client and community expectations
e.	Determines a selection strategy that includes methods, costs and
benefits
f.	 Brings sustainable consequences and options to the client’s notice
E3.2 Designs/develops materials/
components/systems
a.	Defines design requirements and environmental performance criteria
for materials/components/systems
b.	Scopes the design and development process
c.	Gains acceptance of the specifications for material/components/
systems
d.	Plans for disposal/renewal/long term storage options
e.	Applies engineering principles to the development of the materials/
components/systems
f.	 Tests the developed materials/components/ systems against the
design requirements and environmental performance criteria prior to
integration into the project/operation
E3.3 Defines processes to prepare
materials/components/systems for
use in the project/operation
a.	Defines cost effective, sustainable and efficient methods for the
preparation of materials/components/systems
b.	Schedules the access and preparation of materials/components/
systems
c.	Carries out tests using the selected methods to ensure agreed
standards are achieved
d.	Determines interaction that may occur between materials/
components/systems within the operation/project
e.	Prepares certification reports on the characteristics and uses of
materials/ components/systems
f.	 Defines appropriate lifespan profiles for materials/components/systems
E3.4 Manages the use of materials/
components/systems within the
project/operation
a.	Maintains the material/components/systems according to the quality
systems
b.	Reviews the performance of the material/components/systems against
the required outcomes of the project/operation
c.	Applies and modifies procedures to ensure that the material/
component/system is protected from deterioration
d.	Researches new methods to improve performance and introduces new
components/materials/systems according to the quality systems
e.	Reviews community satisfaction with the functionality, sustainability
and aesthetics of the materials/systems used in the project/operation
E3.5 Manages the recovery, reuse and
disposal of materials/ components/
systems
a.	Defines a process for recovery and reusing the maximum amount of
material
b.	Defines the process for disposal/long term storage, minimising
materials to landfill and the production of greenhouse gas emissions
c.	Defines risks in material disposal
d.	Selects the appropriate engineering methods following a consideration
of options
e.	Applies relevant legislation
f.	 Documents the process of disposal/storage/renewal
NOTE: ELEMENTS E3.1, E3.2 AND AT LEAST TWO OTHER ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
30
UNIT E4A: Environmental Management ELECTIVE
DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to examine and determine the environmental
management requirements of engineering work.
Element Defining Activities
E4A.1 Determines the existing
environmental condition
a.	Researches and reviews sustainable imperatives and environmental values
for the engineering project area through consultation and research
b.	Develops/responds to and initiates briefs for environmental studies which
adequately reflect the extent of required work
c.	Audits existing environmental condition and identifies priorities
d.	Scopes the environmental impact of any engineering intervention into the
biophysical and socio-cultural environment
e.	Identifies probable environmental engineering outcomes for the specific
parameters within the brief
f.	 Records/reports on the findings of the initial assessment
E4A.2 Establishes stakeholders’
expectations
a.	Consults with all major stakeholders to establish clear and agreed
sustainability goals and objectives
b.	Determines expectations regarding each component of the environment
c.	Integrates environmental considerations and the imperative for
sustainability with the overall outcome of the operation or project
d.	Identifies stakeholder views on specific options for environmental
improvement and development of sustainability
e.	Records and reports on expectations for project/operation integration
E4A.3 Reviews existing
environmental conditions against
stakeholders’expectations
a.	Determines variations between environmental and sustainability goals and
the current condition of the environment
b.	Establishes the possibilities and options for the ongoing minimisation of
environmental impacts, environmental regeneration and the development
of sustainability
c.	Determines existing directions of project requirements against
expectations
E4A.4 Develops and ranks strategies
to achieve sustainable development
a.	Develops options from professional and stakeholder advice
b.	Determines criteria to assess the feasibility of options
c.	Evaluates available options against assessment criteria to identify risks and
priorities
d.	Provides an environmental report
e.	Develops and reports on strategies to implement preferred options
E4A.5 Implements, monitors and
evaluates strategies
a.	Implements strategies in consultation with appropriate stakeholders and
communities
b.	Integrates environmental management plan and procedures into all
aspects of engineering design and application
c.	Collects and reviews data on implementation of strategies
d.	Evaluates progress and reviews strategies
e.	Reviews outcomes with stakeholders
NOTE: ELEMENTS E4A.1, E4A.2, E4A.3 AND AT LEAST ONE OTHER ELEMENT MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
This unit is MANDATORY for candidates seeking Environmental College membership and registration on the National
Engineering Registers (NPER, NTER or NEAR) in the General Area of Practice of Environmental Engineering.
The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally all 4 Elements are
demonstrated and claimed in one CER to demonstrate the ability to manage the key components of environmental
management of a project in its entirety.
31
OR
UNIT E4B: Investigation and Reporting ELECTIVE
DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to identify and respond to opportunities for
engineering investigation and to make recommendations that solve engineering problems or improve present
applications.
Element Defining Activities
E4B.1 Responds to/Identifies
problems
a.	Redefines problems as necessary
b.	Identifies opportunities for engineering investigations and the likely
stakeholders
c.	Identifies sources of appropriate knowledge
d.	Develops/acts on a brief to carry out the investigation
e.	Researches relevant information, seeking input from stakeholders
f.	 Confirms likely scope of investigation and possible engineering
applications with the relevant stakeholders by developing acceptance
criteria
E4B.2 Plans the investigation a.	Assesses likely resources required for the investigation
b.	Costs the investigation
c.	Identifies and plans interaction with stakeholders
d.	Provides a structure for review which may lead to recommendations for
other projects
e.	Sets sustainability objectives and priorities
f.	 Produces a program of activities for the investigation
g.	Determines method of approach
h.	Ensures that the necessary resources are available
i.	 Liaises with other organizations and individuals who may be affected
by/or who are involved in the investigation
j.	 Defines and agrees upon acceptance criteria and direction with
stakeholders
E4B.3 Carries out the investigation a.	Researches and analyses to isolate problems
b.	Reflects on the definition of problems to ensure accurate definition
c.	Identifies the technological requirements for the investigation
d.	Develops initial options for action
e.	Integrates both the engineering and possible multi-disciplinary issues
into the research to achieve a sustainable solution
f.	 Identifies hazards and risks
g.	Applies scientific methodologies taking into account the legal, financial,
health and environmental requirements
h.	Reviews and improves the brief continuously
i.	 Completes the investigation ensuring that all relevant factors have been
taken into account
E4B.4 Draws conclusions and makes
recommendations
a.	Synthesises information and develops creative recommendations
b.	Considers all aspects of the research in developing conclusions
c.	Costs the recommendations
d.	Reviews the development of conclusions with stakeholders
e.	Seeks feedback on deliverables to ensure that the brief is satisfied
NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally all 4 Elements are
demonstrated and claimed sequentially in one CER to provide the required continuity of events.
32
UNIT E5: Research and Development and Commercialisation ELECTIVE
DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to identify opportunities for Research &
Development (R&D), identify commercial opportunities for the outcomes and to plan and design the research.
Research is a significant aspect of the work and may involve pure research as well as applied research.
Element Defining Activities
E5.1 Indentifies
opportunities for new or
improves processes and/
or products
a.	Identifies and documents opportunities for the engineering application or adaptation
of new concepts, products or technologies
b.	Analyses situations or required outcomes, in consultation with potential clients and
other stakeholders, to determine justification for research
c.	Defines the process for initial background documentation and literature review
d.	Identifies emerging risks of pursuing or rejecting the opportunity
e.	Identifies potential benefits and tangible outcomes of the research and development
opportunity
f.	 Identifies how sustainability can drive innovation and improvement in process and
products
E5.2 Identifies the
resources required for the
R&D
a.	Scopes the R&D concept to develop project objectives in terms of results and time
lines
b.	Formulates and submits cost estimates of development, design, methodology,
procedures, research and analysis
c.	Defines research deliverables in terms of specific measurable results by stages of the
research
d.	Conducts R&D scoping under the direction of environmental management
requirements
E5.3 Initiates concept
development
a.	Determines preliminary strategic objectives and priorities being addressed by the
research
b.	Refines the research process required through a collaborative process to ensure that
all parties that could have a potential interest have an opportunity to express their
interest
c.	Identifies the extent and combination of fundamental or applied research
d.	Analyses the impact of emerging engineering methods, technologies, processes and
hypotheses to refine the R&D concept
e.	Scopes the R&D concept to develop project objectives in terms of results and time
limits
f.	 Clarifies commitment to the concept with all parties directly involved
g.	Develops the concept in relation to the imperatives of sustainability
E5.4 Gains commitment
to the R&D proposal
a.	Prepares formal application for research funds together with supporting documents
b.	Identifies commercial opportunities for R&D application
E5.5 Ensures research is
undertaken
a.	Establishes R&D project management
b.	Identifies a research focus, conducts tests and identifies information for general
application
c.	Methodically measures and records research project parameters
d.	Communicates and monitors R&D progress
e.	Ensures R&D continues to provide innovative engineering applications/ systems/
processes
f.	 Ensures regulatory and legal requirements are addressed
g.	Analyses recorded results and develops conclusions
h.	Reports results with analysis of their significance to the underlying engineering
problem
i.	 Prepares demonstrations (models or prototypes) of the R&D outcomes
E5.6 Collaborates in the
commercialisation of
research outcomes
a.	Collaborates with others to review the costs and benefits of R&D
b.	Provides recommendations for the implementation of R&D based on commercial
analysis
c.	Consults on the development of projects that are implementing R&D outcomes
d.	Provides engineering advice on specific aspects of commercialisation such as
regulatory and legal requirements, pricing, distribution and promotion
e.	Consults to transfer new technology into commercial production
NOTE: ELEMENTS E5.1, E5.2, E5.3, E5.4 AND AT LEAST ONE OTHER ELEMENT MUST BE ADDRESSED IN ORDER TO SATISFY
THIS UNIT
The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally all 5 Elements are
demonstrated and claimed in one CER to demonstrate competency in the key components of a research project.
33
UNIT E6: Source and Estimate Materials ELECTIVE
DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to define requirements, estimate the material
required and identify appropriate sources to access the material from.
Element Defining Activities
E6.1 Defines requirements and
sources for materials
a.	Defines the scope and parameters for the estimate following
interpretation of technical information
b.	Brings to the client’s attention the sustainable implications and options
c.	Analyses estimate requirements in consultation with interested parties
d.	Compares options for materials against technical requirements
e.	Determines and evaluates community expectations of the aesthetics
and functionality of the materials used in the project/operation
f.	 Identifies options and costs to sources of materials
E6.2 Estimates material a.	Carries out calculations to ensure the currency and accuracy of the
figures and rates used
b.	Defines cost effective sustainable and efficient methods for the
preparation of materials/components/systems
c.	Calculates estimates using the correct units in accordance with
specification requirements and procedures
d.	Determines interaction that my occur between materials/components/
systems within the operation/project
e.	Documents and presents estimates to meet the initial requirement
E6.3 Procures material/resources a.	Uses ordering documentation to identify materials and components for
purchasing
b.	Orders materials and components
c.	Maintains ordering and purchasing documentation
E6.4 Prepares materials/
components/systems for use in the
project/operation
a.	Defines cost effective sustainable and efficient methods for the
preparation of materials
b.	Schedules the access and preparation of materials
c.	Carries out tests using the selected methods to ensure agreed
standards are achieved
d.	Determines interaction that may occur between materials within the
operation/ project
e.	Prepares certification reports on the characteristics and uses of
materials
f.	 Accepts or rejects materials
NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally all 4 Elements are
demonstrated and claimed in one CER to demonstrate competency in the key components of the subject
engineering function.
34
UNIT E7: Change and Technical Development ELECTIVE
DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to implement technical developments and act
as a catalyst for the implementation of technical innovation so that improvements in products and services are
achieved.
Element Defining Activities
E7.1 Participation in planning the
introduction of technical change
a.	Contributes effectively in the product/service planning processes to
introduce technical improvements/change
b.	Identifies opportunities for technical improvements in products and
systems
c.	Consults with designated individuals/groups to introduce technical and
operational improvements/change
d.	Explains the business objective and plans to justify technical change to
products/services/systems
E7.2 Develops technically creative
and flexible approaches and
solutions
a.	Identifies and analyses alternative approaches to managing technical
problems
b.	Assesses risks and ensures an environmentally sustainable position is taken
to achieve technical improvements with a recognised benefit or advantage
to the organisation
c.	Participate in the workplace by promoting the development of innovative
approaches to achieve technical outcomes
d.	Reviews resource management to improve productivity and/or reduce costs
E7.3 Manages emerging technical
challenges and opportunities
a.	Responds to the changing technical needs of customers/stakeholders
b.	Keeps individuals/teams informed of progress in the implementation of
technical changes
c.	Negotiates and implements recommendations for improving the methods/
techniques to manage technical change
NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally all 3 Elements are
demonstrated and claimed in one CER to provide the required sequence of events.
35
UNIT E8: Technical Sales and Promotion ELECTIVE
DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to identify opportunities for the sale of
technical products/systems and provide technical product information to internal and external clients.
Element Defining Activities
E8.1 Identifies sales opportunities a.	Identifies potential clients
b.	Establishes contact with clients through providing information on
technical products related to their processes/product
c.	Seeks information on potential client concerns or awareness of
shortcomings in present processes
d.	Researches to identify future technical and market trends
e.	Identifies opportunities to present the features and the benefits of the
technical product/process
E8.2 Applies product knowledge to
client requirements
a.	Analyses the client’s process/service/product to identify areas for
improvement
b.	Assists the client to specify their requirements
c.	Provides information on the technical product/process to meet the
client’s acknowledged requirements or likely future requirements
d.	Promotes the environmental and energy factors of the product
e.	Trains clients in applying technical products
E8.3 Promotes technical capability of
the product/system
a.	Provides internal sales staff with information on the technical capability
of the product/system
b.	Develops and presents product/system promotional information
c.	Attends and contributes to industry conferences in the area of product/
system specialisation
E8.4 Seeks client feedback a.	Contacts clients to establish satisfaction with the product
b.	Reviews and acts on feedback
c.	Communicates with other staff to review process and improve service
where required
d.	Provides ongoing client support as required
NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally all 4 Elements are
demonstrated and claimed in one CER to demonstrate competency in the key components of the subject
engineering function.
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Engineers australia chartered status

  • 1. ENGINEERS AUSTRALIA Chartered Status - a Handbook for Applicants
  • 2. ENGINEERS AUSTRALIA Chartered Status – A Handbook for Applicants STATUS REVISION DATE AUTHORISATION Controlled Document 02/2011 February 2011 Director, Education and Assessment Note: This Chartered Status Handbook for Applicants undergoes regular critical review and revision to reflect contemporary Engineers competencies and how they are gained. Accordingly, Applicants for Chartered Status should refer to the current version of the Chartered Status Handbook for Applicants on the Engineers Australia website at http://www.engineersaustralia.org.au/professional-development 2 © Copyright Engineers Australia 2011 This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without prior written permission from Engineers Australia. Requests and inquiries concerning the reproduction and rights should be addressed to the Director Education and Assessment, Engineers Australia, 11 National Circuit Barton ACT 2600.
  • 3. FOREWORD Congratulations on your decision to seek Chartered Status. In doing so, you have acknowledged that academic qualifications are only the beginning of a career in engineering and that continuing professional development is an essential component of maintaining your knowledge after initial formal education has been completed. Chartered Status is the next important goal in a career in engineering. Professional Engineers, Engineering Technologists and Engineering Officers (Associates) who attain Chartered Status represent the highest professional standards, expressing a commitment to keeping pace with the increasing expectations and requirements of engineering in our modern world. Chartered Status is a credential which affords you international recognition and most importantly, certification that you are competent to practise and exercise leadership within the engineering team. Engineering employers, clients and governments are increasingly valuing the quality and professionalism that Chartered Status represents as insurance against risk and uncertainty and to match expectations of value and safety. Additionally, Chartered Status is the linkage to registration, which is becoming more important to governments and consumers of engineering services. Having met the additional requirements of Engineers Australia, Chartered practitioners automatically qualify to join the National Professional Engineers Register (NPER), the National Engineering Technologists Register (NETR) or the National Engineering Associates Register (NEAR). Chartered Status will also provide a pathway to registration in Queensland under that state’s Professional Engineers Act. This handbook has been designed to assist you in preparing for the competency based assessment for Chartered Status in one of the three occupational categories: Chartered Professional Engineer (CPEng), Chartered Engineering Technologist (CEngT) and Chartered Engineering Officer (CEngO) and subsequent registration on the respective register. The achievement of Chartered Status and Registration will require effort and determination on your part. However, I can assure you that the benefits that will flow to you will make it well worth your while. We are here to support you throughout the whole process. Peter Taylor FIEAust CPEng Chief Executive 3
  • 5. Introduction Chartered Status Pathways .................................................................................................. 6 Defining the Engineering Team........................................................................................... 7 Competency Terms.................................................................................................................10 Professional Formation.........................................................................................................10 Engineering Practice Report Preparing your Engineering Practice Report..................................................................11 Preparing for your Competency Based Assessment...................................................11 Mature Experienced Engineers Pathway to Chartered Status................................13 Appendix A Stage 2 Competency Units and Elements......................................................................14 Appendix B Registration, Areas of Practice, Colleges and International Agreements............17 Appendix C Part 1: Stage 2 Competency Units, Elements and Defining Activities.................22 Part 2: Standards to which Stage 2 Competencies must be Demonstrated......36 Appendix D Example of a Career Episode Report................................................................................39 Appendix E Code of Ethics...........................................................................................................................41 Appendix F Engineers Australia Accredited Assessors......................................................................44 Appendix G Application for Chartered Status of Engineers Australia..........................................45 5
  • 6. 6 INTRODUCTION The purpose of this handbook is to crystallise your understanding of engineering competencies and how they are gained. You will be able to apply this to preparing your Engineering Practice Report and successfully completing your application. Please follow the handbook carefully for the best results. To become a Chartered Engineer (CPEng), Technologist (CEngT) or Officer (Associate) (CEngO) you must be eligible for membership of Engineers Australia. Please visit www.engineersaustralia.org.au under Membership for information on becoming a member. CHARTERED STATUS PATHWAYS This diagram simplifies how to obtain and maintain Chartered Status for Engineers, Technologists and Officers (Associates): Eligibility Requirements: 1. Membership of Engineers Australia or eligibility to become a member 2. Period of professional formation representing 3+ years of engineering experience Maintaining Chartered Status: • 150 hours of Continuing Professional Development required every 3 years • Subject to audit every 5 years The four ways to become Chartered: 1. Engineering Practice Report + Professional Interview • Submit one report for assessment • Attend professional interview 2. Professional Development Program + Professional Interview • Submit continuous Career Episode Reports and be assessed for each • Attend professional interview 3. Mature Experienced Engineers Pathway • Submit Statement of Experience and Continuing Professional Development record • Attend professional interview • Requires 15+ years of experience including 5 in position(s) of responsibility • Must be an Engineers Australia member 4. Mutual Recognition Agreement • Recognised international qualification is checked and verified
  • 7. 7 DEFINING THE ENGINEERING TEAM The engineering team includes a variety of occupations and specialisations. This handbook covers three occupational categories: Professional Engineer, Engineering Technologist and Engineering Officer (also known as Engineering Associate). PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS The benchmark Stage 1 qualification for Professional Engineers is the four-year Bachelor of Engineering degree. Professional Engineers are responsible for interpreting technological possibilities to society, business and government. They are also responsible for ensuring, as far as possible, that policy decisions are properly informed, and that costs, risks and limitations are properly understood as the desired outcomes. Professional Engineers are required to take responsibility for engineering projects and programs in the most far-reaching sense. They are responsible for the reliable functioning of all materials and technologies used; integration to form complete and self- consistent systems; and all interactions between the technical systems and the environment in which they function. The latter includes understanding the requirements of clients and of society as a whole; working to optimise social, environmental and economic outcomes over the lifetime of the product or program; interacting effectively with the other disciplines, professions and people involved; and ensuring that the engineering contribution is properly integrated into the totality of the undertaking. Professional Engineers at the level of Stage 2 competency are expected to have demonstrated the propensity to take charge of major projects or interactions in a work situation, even if they have not actually done so. The work of Professional Engineers is predominately intellectual in nature. In the technical domain, they are primarily concerned with the advancement of technologies and with the development of new technologies and their applications through innovation, creativity and change. They may conduct research concerned with advancing the science of engineering and with developing new engineering principles and technologies. Alternatively, they may contribute to continual improvement in the practice of engineering, and to devising and updating the Codes and Standards that govern it. Professional Engineers have a particular responsibility for ensuring that all aspects of a project are soundly based in theory and fundamental principle, and for understanding how new developments relate to established practice and to other disciplines with which they may interact. One hallmark of a professional is the capacity to break new ground in an informed and responsible way. Professional Engineers may lead or manage teams appropriate to these activities, may establish their own companies or move into senior management roles in engineering and related enterprises.
  • 8. 8 ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGISTS The benchmark Stage 1 qualification for Engineering Technologists is the three-year Bachelor of Engineering degree. Engineering Technologists normally operate within a relatively well-defined technical environment and undertake a wide range of functions and responsibilities. They are typically specialists in a particular field of engineering technology and their expertise lies in familiarity with its current state of development and its most recent applications. Within their specialist field, their expertise may be at a high level and fully equivalent to that of a Professional Engineer. However, Engineering Technologists are not expected to exercise the same breadth of perspective as a Professional Engineer nor carry the same responsibilities for stakeholder interactions, for system integration and for synthesizing overall approaches to complex situations and complex engineering problems. The work of Engineering Technologists combines the need for a strong grasp of practical situations and applications, with the intellectual challenge of keeping abreast of leading-edge developments in their particular field. For this purpose they need a strong understanding of scientific and engineering principles and a well- developed capacity for analysis. The work of Engineering Technologists is mostly about applying current and emerging technologies, often in new contexts or to applying established principles in the development of new practice. They may contribute to the advancement of particular technologies as well. Some Engineering Technologist qualifications include an emphasis on technical management as well as a grounding in a particular area of technology. Technical management is seen as an appropriate field of specialisation in itself and many Engineering Technologists build their own career paths in this direction. Examples of such specialisation include product development, mine management, and the management and maintenance of processing plants, complex building services or testing laboratories. Persons may also be recognised as Engineering Technologists who hold degrees in fields related to engineering and who have developed expertise and experience in applying their knowledge in conjunction with engineering work. Examples might be in geology and geotechnics, information technology and software development, mining, biomedical technology, optical communications, renewable energy systems and agriculture. The competencies of Engineering Technologists equip them to approve and certify many technical operations such as calibration and testing regimes, compliance with performance-based criteria for fire safety and the design of components and sub-systems and of installations such as building services that do not call for significant new development. Such certification should be fully acceptable in the public domain and should not require further endorsement by other practitioners perceived to be more highly qualified. Engineering Technologists may lead or manage teams appropriate to these activities. Some may establish their own companies or may move into senior management roles in engineering and related enterprises, employing professional engineers and other specialists where appropriate.
  • 9. 9 ENGINEERING OFFICERS (ASSOCIATES) The benchmark Stage 1 qualification for Engineering Officers is the two-year Advanced Diploma/ Associate Degree in Engineering, classified at Level 6 (AQF-6) under the Australian Qualifications Framework. Engineering Officers focus mainly on practical applications. They may be expert in installing, testing and monitoring equipment and systems, in the operation and maintenance of advanced plant, and in managing or supervising tradespeople in these activities. They may be expert in selecting equipment and components to meet given specifications and in assembling these to form systems customised to particular projects. Engineering Officers are often required to be familiar with Standards and Codes of Practice and to become expert in the interpretation and application of such Standards in a wide variety of situations. Many develop very extensive experience of practical installations. In fact, they are often more knowledgeable than a Professional Engineer or Engineering Technologist on detailed aspects that can contribute very greatly to safety, cost or effectiveness in operation. In other instances, Engineering Officers may develop high levels of expertise in aspects of design and development processes. These might include, for example, the use of advanced software to perform detailed design of structures, mechanical components and systems, manufacturing or process plants, electrical and electronic equipment, information and communications systems. Another example might be in the construction of experimental or prototype equipment. Again, experienced operators in these areas often develop detailed practical knowledge and experience complementing the broader or more theoretical knowledge of others. Engineering Officers need a good grounding in engineering science and the principles underlying their field of expertise to ensure that their knowledge is portable across different applications and situations. Context-specific training and experience in a particular job are not sufficient to guarantee generic competency. Given a good knowledge base however, Engineering Officers may build further on this through high levels of training in particular contexts and in relation to particular equipment. Aircraft maintenance is an excellent example. The competencies of Engineering Officers equip them to certify the quality of engineering work and the condition of equipment and systems in defined circumstances, laid down in recognised Standards and Codes of Practice. Such certification should be fully acceptable in the public domain and should not require further endorsement by other practitioners who are perceived to be more highly qualified. Engineering Officers may lead or manage teams appropriate to these activities. Some may establish their own companies or may move into senior management roles in engineering and other related enterprises, employing Professional Engineers and other specialists where appropriate.
  • 10. 10 COMPETENCY TERMS Competency is the ability to perform activities within an occupation to standards expected and recognised by employers and the community. Competencies are expressed in terms of Units and Elements and are demonstrated through the demonstration of the Defining Activities. The Unit title describes a particular area of performance, for example Engineering Practice. The Elements are the necessary components or activities which make up the Unit of Competency. Each Element has a set of Defining Activities which provide a guide to the level of performance and allow a judgment to be made on whether the element of competency has been achieved. Graduates are Stage 1 Professional Engineers, Engineering Technologists or Engineering Officers, that is, they have demonstrated the attainment of essential educational competencies through the completion of a recognised tertiary engineering qualification. Graduates work under guidance and supervision. Those with Chartered Status or Professional Engineers, Engineering Technologists or Engineering Officers (Associates) who have demonstrated Stage 2 competence will have undertaken broad-based experience. They have the competencies to work independently and display leadership in creating and applying new engineering practices on a regular basis, that is; they have demonstrated engineering skills and judgment in addition to educational competencies and can practice in a competent, independent and ethical manner. PROFESSIONAL FORMATION The period during which a graduate engineer gains the necessary professional engineering competencies in order to practice in an independent and ethical manner is known as Professional Formation. Professional Formation mainly takes place following the completion of a formal engineering or technology degree or advanced diploma/ associate degree. Engineering experience gained prior to graduation may be admissible in cases where the experience meets Stage 2 competency standards. A minimum period of Professional Formation is not generally stipulated as the assessment for the award of Chartered Status is based on demonstrated competencies rather than a period of time. However, in accordance with Engineers Australia Bye-Laws and Membership Regulations, a graduate must have at least three years of work experience at the level of their related occupational category to achieve Chartered Status. The period for Professional Formation is usually minimised in cases where the enterprise you are working for has partnered with Engineers Australia to provide its employees with an approved Professional Development Program (PDP). Engineers can also join the PDP as individual participants. Details about the PDP can be found on the Engineers Australia website at www.engineersaustralia.org.au
  • 11. 11 PREPARING YOUR ENGINEERING PRACTICE REPORT Your Engineering Practice Report (EPR) consists of a series of written Career Episode Reports (CERs) each describing experience gained during your Professional Formation. A Career Episode Report (CER) is a documented component of your professional experience. It indicates the attainment of experience related to relevant Elements of Competency. A career episode may be made up of a number of related professional experiences over a continuous period. The significance of individual career episodes varies. A minor career episode may cover a relatively short period of time (several months) and be advanced to claim some Elements of Competency. A major career episode (a large or lengthy project for example) can be advanced to demonstrate an entire Unit of Competency. A collection of narratives relating to the career episodes forms the basis of your EPR. Each narrative (report) should emphasise problems identified and the problem-solving techniques you utilised in overcoming them. Full details of the Stage 2 Competencies and the Standards by which they are measured are given at Appendix C. Of particular importance are the Standards (Part 2 of Appendix C). The Standards set the context against which a competency must be demonstrated within each occupational category. The notes provide essential guidance as to how you should interpret and address the Unit. There are several steps you should follow when preparing for the Competency Based Assessment. Follow the steps closely and contact the Engineers Australia Accredited Assessor identified at Appendix F if you have any queries. PREPARING FOR YOUR COMPETENCY BASED ASSESSMENT STEP 1 To be eligible for Chartered Status you must: • be a financial member, or eligible to become a member, of Engineers Australia in one of the three engineering occupational categories (for details of how to apply, refer to the Engineers Australia website www.engineersaustralia.org.au) • have at least three years of engineering experience in the relevant occupational category. STEP 2 Determine in which occupational category you will be applying for Chartered Status: Chartered Professional Engineer (CPEng), Chartered Engineering Technologist (CEngT) or Chartered Engineering Officer (CEngO). To assist you, please refer to the previous section titled “Defining the Engineering Team”. STEP 3 Write the CERs that, when assembled, will form your EPR based on your professional experience in the general area of practice in which you are seeking recognition. Should you be seeking registration on the NPER/NETR/NEAR, browse through the section titled “Registration, Areas of Practice, Colleges and International Agreements”in Appendix B. If you are seeking recognition in a specific area of practice, you need to seek further information as explained in Appendix B. Your report then needs to demonstrate that you have practised independently in the specific area. Reports should emphasise: • your personal contribution and responsibilities • the problems you faced • the solution(s) you found • the engineering judgments you made • the impact your solution(s) and judgments generated. ENGINEERING PRACTICE REPORT
  • 12. 12 An example of a Career Episode Report (CER) is shown in Appendix D. Your CER is to be printed on A4 sheets, in English, in narrative form and using the first person singular, and should describe the specific contributions you have made. STEP 4 Consult the list of Units and Elements of Competency in Appendix A and make a selection of the Elements you believe you have achieved. Review your selection against the respective Defining Activities (Appendix C) and ensure that you have demonstrated most or all of the Defining Activities in order to claim that you have demonstrated an element of competence. Please note that only the Elements and not the Defining Activities are to be noted in the right hand column. When writing your CERs you will need to refer to Appendix C both Part 1 and Part 2. Remember that your EPR must show that you have demonstrated your competency in all three Compulsory Units of Competency (including all seventeen Elements) plus two of the ten Elective Units of Competency (including the specified number of Elements). If you have not demonstrated the requisite Units and Elements, write further career episodes until you have satisfied the requirement. Remember that the wording of each CER should clearly indicate how these Elements have been demonstrated (refer to the CER example at Appendix D). Your EPR can now be formed by linking all your CERs. STEP 5 Each of your CERs must be verified by a senior experienced engineer (preferably a Chartered Engineer) from at least the same occupational category in which you are seeking Chartered Status. Verifiers must be able to attest that you have performed the work you have written about. In some cases this may not be possible and a Statutory Declaration (refer to the Application Form in Appendix G) is required in lieu of attestation. STEP 6 You are now able to complete your application by providing one original and two copies of the following documentation: a) Completed Application Form b) A certified passport-style photo c) A certified true copy of your passport bio-data page or Australian Driver’s Licence (where this is not available, a certified copy of your Birth Certificate or Official Identity Document may be acceptable in lieu). d) A verified Curriculum Vitae (CV) covering your employment experience since completing your first tertiary qualifications. The CV is to be verified by a responsible Engineer whose signature must be accompanied by their printed name, address, email address, phone number and status or if verified by a member of Engineers Australia, their membership number, printed name and signature. The CV verification should cover at least the last three years of engineering employment. The following statement is to be signed by the verifier: “I verify that this is a true statement of the career history of (candidate’s name) during the period (date) to (date).” If you cannot provide verification of employment for any of the last three year period, a properly witnessed Statutory Declaration stating why you have not been able to have the information verified, what steps you took to locate the verifier and that the information contained in your CV is true and correct covering that period must accompany your application. Refer to page 5 of the Application Form. e) Details of your Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for example, formal education and training, seminars or conferences attended, presentations and papers and private reading. For further details refer to the Engineers Australia website at www.engineersaustralia.org.au f) Your Engineers Australia membership number (documented on the Application Form). If you are not a current member of Engineers Australia and hold accredited Australian engineering qualifications (typically a four-year professional engineering qualification, a three-year engineering technology qualification or a two-year advanced diploma/associate degree in engineering) you must provide a certified copy of your degree/diploma testamur(s). If your qualifications are not accredited by Engineers Australia or are from a country other than Australia, a certified copy of your assessment letter from Engineers Australia indicating that you have qualifications which meet the academic requirements to confer recognition as a Stage 1 Engineer must be provided. If you are applying under a Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) please refer to our website www.engineersaustralia.org.au under Membership for further information. g) Payment of the Chartered assessment fee. Please refer to the latest fee schedule at www.engineersaustralia.org.au under Membership.
  • 13. 13 STEP 7 Submit all of these documents and your payment to the Accredited Assessor located in your region identified at Appendix F. STEP 8 When your EPR is assessed as satisfactory, you will be invited to attend a Professional Interview (PI). The PI is essentially a peer review of the competencies you have claimed. The PI will be conducted by a panel which includes Chartered Members of Engineers Australia in your chosen engineering discipline and area of practice. The Engineers Australia Accredited Assessor will also be present or linked by telephone to act as a facilitator and moderator at the interview. At the start of the PI you will be asked to make an uninterrupted fifteen-minute presentation in support of your application. During the remainder of the PI you should be prepared to discuss the Defining Activities pertaining to your selected Elements of Competency. Questions by the Assessment Panel on technical aspects of your career are anticipated to take approximately 30 minutes. This may be extended depending on the circumstances. The interview is not expected to exceed 60 minutes. You should also be prepared to answer questions on the Engineers Australia Code of Ethics (refer to Appendix E) and contemporary engineering issues such as the environment and sustainability. If there are points that require clarification, you may be requested to undertake a Technical Assignment at the completion of your PI. Unsuccessful applicants will receive counseling and advice regarding future professional development requirements they should seek in order to attain Chartered Status. Applicants for registration in a specific area of practice should note that the Assessment Panel has to be satisfied that you have: • Met the Stage 2 competencies in a general area of practice; and • Provided evidence of your practice in the specific area. You should note that as a practicing engineer in Australia you are expected to be able to communicate effectively in the English language. Your competencies in English will be assessed during the PI and in the assessment of the EPR. MATURE EXPERIENCED ENGINEERS PATHWAY TO CHARTERED STATUS Mature and more experienced engineering participants with at least fifteen years of broad-based engineering experience since graduation and who have been responsible for substantial work in their occupational category may demonstrate their acquisition of competencies by submission of a less voluminous Statement of Experience. Potential applicants should download the “Mature Experienced Engineers Pathway to Chartered Status” document available at www.engineersaustralia.org.au and read in conjunction with this Handbook. Applicant’s attention should be drawn to the Entry Requirements and Method of Application.
  • 14. 14 APPENDIX A STAGE 2 COMPETENCY UNITS AND ELEMENTS COMPULSORY UNITS AND THEIR RESPECTIVE ELEMENTS For competency demonstration requirements, refer to Step 4 of the previous section Engineering Practice Report. Fuller details of the Competencies are given in Appendix C (Part 1 and 2). When applying for Chartered Status and registration on the National Professional Engineers Register (NPER) / National Engineering Technologists Register (NETR) / National Engineering Associates Register (NEAR) you need to address the following three Compulsory Units of Competency (UNIT C1, C2, C3). Note that all seventeen [17] Elements within the Units must be addressed. UNIT C1 ENGINEERING PRACTICE Your checklist ELEMENTS: C1.1 Presents and Develops a Professional Image YES NO C1.2 Pursues Continuing Professional Development YES NO C1.3 Integrates Engineering with Other Professional Input YES NO C1.4 Develops Engineering Solutions YES NO C1.5 Identifies Constraints on Potential Engineering Solutions YES NO UNIT C2 ENGINEERING PLANNING AND DESIGN Your checklist ELEMENTS: C2.1 Interprets and Scopes Design Requirements YES NO C2.2 Prepares Concept Proposal and Seeks Advice on Latest Technology YES NO C2.3 Implements Planning and Design Process YES NO C2.4 Reviews the Design to Achieve Acceptance YES NO C2.5 Prepares and Maintains Documentation During the Design Process YES NO C2.6 Validates Design YES NO UNIT C3 SELF MANAGEMENT IN THE ENGINEERING WORKPLACE Your checklist ELEMENTS: C3.1 Manages Self YES NO C3.2 Works Effectively with People YES NO C3.3 Facilitates and Capitalises on Change and Innovation YES NO C3.4 Plans and Manages Work Priorities and Resources YES NO C3.5 Maintains Customer Focus and Relationships with Clients/Stakeholders/ Suppliers/Regulators YES NO C3.6 Manages Information YES NO
  • 15. 15 Plus You need to address two of the ten Elective Units and the specified number of Elements stipulated within the Units. Note that E1A and E1B are mutually exclusive, as are E4A and E4B. ELECTIVE UNITS AND THEIR RESPECTIVE ELEMENTS UNIT E1A ENGINEERING BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Your checklist ELEMENTS: AT LEAST FIVE ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED FROM THE FOLLOWING: E1A.1 Contributes to Engineering Business Strategies YES NO E1A.2 Develops Client Relationships YES NO E1A.3 Manages the Implementation of Engineering Plans within the Business YES NO E1A.4 Manages Resources YES NO E1A.5 Manages People YES NO E1A.6 Manages Suppliers YES NO E1A.7 Manages Business Information YES NO E1A.8 Monitors Engineering Business Performance YES NO OR UNIT E1B ENGINEERING PROJECT MANAGEMENT Your checklist ELEMENTS: AT LEAST FIVE ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED FROM THE FOLLOWING: E1B.1 Develops Project Integration YES NO E1B.2 Scopes the Project YES NO E1B.3 Manages People YES NO E1B.4 Manages the Physical Resources within the Project YES NO E1B.5 Manages Quality, Safety, Environment and Risk YES NO E1B.6 Manages Cost and Procurement YES NO E1B.7 Manages Time and Progress YES NO E1B.8 Finalises the Project YES NO UNIT E2 ENGINEERING OPERATIONS Your checklist ELEMENTS: ELEMENT E2.2 AND AT LEAST FOUR OTHER ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED FROM THE FOLLOWING: E2.1 Plans Operations and Systems YES NO E2.2 Manages the Process with the Operation/System YES NO E2.3 Manages the Assets within the Operation/System YES NO E2.4 Manages People YES NO E2.5 Measures and Documents Engineering Operation/System YES NO E2.6 Management of Environmental Performance YES NO UNIT E3 MATERIALS/COMPONENTS/SYSTEMS Your checklist ELEMENTS: ELEMENTS E3.1, E3.2 AND AT LEAST TWO OTHER ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED FROM THE FOLLOWING: E3.1 Determines Engineering Requirements YES NO E3.2 Designs/Develops Materials/Components/Systems YES NO E3.3 Defines Processes to Prepare Materials/Components/Systems YES NO E3.4 Manages the Uses of Materials/Components/Systems within the Project/ Operation YES NO E3.5 Manages the Recovery, Reuse and Disposal of Materials/Components/Systems YES NO
  • 16. 16 UNIT E4A ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Your checklist Please note: Applicants for NPER Environmental (general) MUST address this Unit and MUST also respond to the “Guideline for Environmental Engineering*”. ELEMENTS: ELEMENTS E4A.1, E4A.2, E4A.3 AND AT LEAST ONE OTHER ELEMENT MUST BE ADDRESSED FROM THE FOLLOWING: E4A.1 Determines the Existing Environmental Condition YES NO E4A.2 Establishes Stakeholders’Expectations YES NO E4A.3 Reviews Existing Environmental Conditions Against Stakeholders’Expectations YES NO E4A.4 Develops and Ranks Strategies to Achieve Sustainable Development YES NO E4A.5 Implements, Monitors and Evaluates Strategies YES NO *The “Guideline for Environmental Engineering”can be located on the National Engineering Registration Board website at www.engineersaustralia.org.au/nerb under Areas of Practice – General Areas – Environmental Engineering. OR UNIT E4B INVESTIGATION AND REPORTING Your checklist ELEMENTS: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED E4B.1 Responds to/Identifies Problems YES NO E4B.2 Plans the Investigation YES NO E4B.3 Carries out the Investigation YES NO E4B.4 Draws Conclusions and Makes Recommendations YES NO UNIT E5 RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AND COMMERCIALISATION Your checklist ELEMENTS: ELEMENT E5.1, E5.2, E5.3, E5.4 AND AT LEAST ONE OTHER ELEMENT MUST BE ADDRESSED FROM THE FOLLOWING: E5.1 Identifies Opportunities for New or Improved Processes and/or Products YES NO E5.2 Identifies the Resources Required for the R&D YES NO E5.3 Initiates Concept Development YES NO E5.4 Gains Commitment to the R&D Proposal YES NO E5.5 Ensures Research is Undertaken YES NO E5.6 Collaborates in the Commercialisation of Research Outcomes YES NO UNIT E6 SOURCE AND ESTIMATE MATERIALS Your checklist ELEMENTS: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED E6.1 Defines Requirements and Sources for Materials YES NO E6.2 Estimates Materials YES NO E6.3 Procures Materials/Resources YES NO E6.4 Prepares Materials/Components/Systems for use in the Project/Operation YES NO UNIT E7 CHANGE AND TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT Your checklist ELEMENTS: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED E7.1 Participates in Planning the Introduction of Technical Change YES NO E7.2 Develops Technically Creative and Flexible Approaches and Solutions YES NO E7.3 Manages Emerging Technical Challenges and Opportunities YES NO UNIT E8 TECHNICAL SALES AND PROMOTION Your checklist ELEMENTS: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED E8.1 Identifies Sales Opportunities YES NO E8.2 Applies Product Knowledge to Client Requirements YES NO E8.3 Promotes Technical Capability of the Product/System YES NO E8.4 Seeks Client Feedback YES NO
  • 17. 17 APPENDIX B REGISTRATION, AREAS OF PRACTICE, COLLEGES, AND INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS INTRODUCTION Public Safety is protected when only competent practitioners are registered to provide engineering services in critical areas. Registered practitioners will be engaged to provide services in such areas only if stipulated by regulation or demanded by the market. Information imbalance is reduced when registration standards are made available. Published information must express the observable functions that are necessary to practise competently in each area of the register in terms of competency-based eligibility criteria. In some instances, Regulatory Schemes are used when governments find a need to place aspects of practice under the law. This is usually because the government has assessed that practice by unqualified or inadequately experienced or uninsured practitioners in such areas puts the community at a greater risk than the constraints on competition associated with registration. The National Professional Engineers Register (NPER) was launched in 1994, the National Engineering Technologists Register (NETR) was introduced in 1996 and the National Engineering Associates Register (NEAR) was launched in 2008. Engineers Australia administers the three National Engineering Registers on advice from a board established to ensure the registers operate with integrity and in the public interest at no cost to the government, with a particular emphasis on public safety and the risks associated with information imbalance in an engineer-client relationship. NATIONAL ENGINEERING REGISTRATION BOARD The National Engineering Registration Board (the Board) was established jointly by Engineers Australia, the Association of Professional Engineers, Scientists and Managers, Australia (APESMA) and Consult Australia (formerly ACEA). The Board, representing State and Territory Governments, Community Organisations and Professional Associations, ensures that national registers are administered in the public interest. The Board, which includes a nominated Engineering Technologist and Engineering Associate, supervises the administration of the registers. Engineers Australia administers NPER, NETR and NEAR as the service provider to the Board. REGULATORY SCHEMES The Engineers Australia Professional Standards Scheme is a limitation of liability scheme approved under the professional standards legislation of each State and Territory. The scheme is designed to improve the occupational standards of the profession, protect consumers and put a cap on the amount of damages a court can award against members covered by the scheme in legal actions for economic loss or property damage arising from anything they did or did not do in carrying out their occupation. Engineers Australia is an approved assessment entity under the Professional Engineers Act 2002(QLD), approved to assess qualifications and competencies under Part 2 of the Act for persons wishing to apply for registration as a Registered Professional Engineer of Queensland (RPEQ). Registration on NPER or CPEng provides sufficient evidence for a successful assessment. Registration on NPER also provides evidence of technical competence required for accreditation as a certifier under the Building Professionals Act 2005 (NSW).
  • 18. 18 REGISTRATION STANDARDS Assessment against Stage 2 Competency Standards (Appendix C Part 2) is necessarily related to the occupational roles in which the competencies have been exercised, and to the scope offered by those roles – but is not necessarily limited to them. A person employed in one occupational group may well demonstrate some of the attributes of another group; and different people may perform the same role in different ways, for example, in the degree of initiative shown. The integrity of the registration system is sustained where applicants expect to be assessed against objective competency standards that take account of their knowledge and understanding as well as their workplace activities in a way that is both visible and defensible. REGISTRATION OBLIGATIONS Members of Engineers Australia and non-members who register on NPER/NETR/NEAR undertake to be bound by Engineers Australia’s Code of Ethics and the Disciplinary Regulations that underpin it. All registrants are required to practise only within the limits of their competence and to maintain records of their Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for audit purposes. Chartered members and registered non-members, at the time of application, undertake to record a minimum of 150 hours of CPD activities in any three-year period. Applicants also must certify that they have spent a total of at least one year during the last three years engaged in independent practice or working as an employee under general direction or have been enrolled in a formal postgraduate course directly related to their areas of practice. Details of acceptable CPD activities, minimum requirements and certain limitations can be found on the Engineers Australia website at www.engineersaustralia. org.au/yourcpdaudit. AREAS OF PRACTICE Twelve general areas of practice are available for registration on the National Engineering Registers: Aerospace Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Building Services Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Information, Telecommunications, Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Structural Engineering, Naval Architecture and Management. Five specific areas of practice are currently available to practitioners who are registered in an appropriate general area of practice on a National Engineering Register: Fire Safety Engineering, Heritage and Conservation Engineering, In-service Inspection of Amusement Rides and Devices, Pressure Equipment Design Verification and Subdivisional Geotechnics. Information on areas of practice can be found at www.nerb.org.au/areas-of-practice. CURRENT GENERAL AREAS OF PRACTICE The following descriptions are provided to help you choose your general area of practice on a national Engineering Register. For further information and guidelines on eligibility criteria, applicants should visit www.nerb.org.au/areas-of-practice. AEROSPACE ENGINEERING Aerospace Engineering is concerned with aerodynamics and performance, aircraft stores, airports and ground systems, airways systems, cabin environment, cockpit ergonomics, communications systems, computer systems and avionics, crashworthiness, electrical systems, electronic warfare, environmental effects, fire safety and control, flight management systems, flight simulators, flight navigation systems noise and acoustic effects, propulsions systems, radar systems, risk management, satellite systems, software, structures, test flight control, tracking systems, vehicle dynamics and vehicle launch and recovery. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING Biomedical Engineering is concerned with research, design, development, evaluation, manufacture, installation, operation, maintenance, management and control of biomedical devices, facilities and equipment designed to support and enhance human life and help individuals to overcome physical disabilities. It is also concerned with the planning and assessment of medical procedures and the development of related data handling facilities. Applicants must have significant training in the life sciences, typically 80 hours of formal education or equivalent, and hold or have held a position of professional responsibility in biomedical engineering. BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERING Building Services Engineering is concerned with aspects of the built environment, involving air conditioning and mechanical ventilation, electrical light and power, fire services, Fire Safety Engineering, water and waste services, data and communications, security and access control, vertical transportation, acoustics in buildings and energy management. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Chemical Engineering is concerned with research, teaching, design, development, economics, manufacture, installation, operation, sales, maintenance and management of commercial scale chemical plants and process systems, industrial processing and fabrication of products undergoing chemical and/or physical changes being applied to materials for construction, process systems and equipment for instrumentation and control, and protection of the environment. Applicants must have experience in the safety aspects of design and/or operations. In addition, they must have experience in two of the following functions involving process systems and equipment: design, evaluation, operation, materials selection and fabrication.
  • 19. 19 CIVIL ENGINEERING Civil Engineering is concerned with materials such as steel, concrete, timber, earth and rock, and with their application in the research, design, development, manufacture, construction, operation, maintenance and management of hydraulic, structural, environmental and systems aspects of infrastructure works and services such as water, sewerage, transport, urban development and municipal services, and with building and construction for other infrastructure industries. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Electrical Engineering is concerned with research, design, development, manufacture, installation, operation, maintenance and management of equipment, plant and systems within the electrical, electronic, communication and computers systems areas being applied to electrical power generation, transmission, distribution and utilization, manufacture, instrumentation and control in industry, communications networks, electronic plant and equipment, integration and control of computer systems. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING Environmental Engineering is concerned with water and waste water treatment and environmental management (including application or re-use and recycling), waste management (including ecoefficiency and cleaner production concepts, and life cycle assessment), surface and ground water system environmental management (including water quality management), contaminated land assessment and remediation, natural resource management, environment protection, management and pollution control, environmental management system design (including environmental management planning and auditing), environmental impact assessments and environmental information systems, natural systems accounting (including economic evaluation), social impact analysis, community consultation and dispute resolution, sustainable assessment and management, and environmental policy formulation. INFORMATION, TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING Information, Telecommunications and Electronics Engineering is concerned with communications and telecommunications systems and engineering, computer systems engineering, software engineering, electronics engineering, internet, microelectronics and optical fibre technology. MANAGEMENT This category is for practitioners who undertake functions recognised as being managerial rather than technical in content. Applicants seeking registration under the management category would be expected to be undertaking activities which call upon their engineering qualifications and experience. Such managerial activities might typically include general management in an engineering environment, policy development, quality assurance and total quality management, design and delivery of training programs, marketing of engineering products or services, financial or human resource management. You will not normally be able to register in the management category unless you previously have gained sufficient experience in an engineering discipline and have met the requirements for registration in this engineering discipline. Subsequent to this experience you must have acquired appropriate skills and knowledge in general management. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Mechanical Engineering is concerned with design, development, research, evaluation, manufacture, installation, testing, operation, maintenance and management of machines, mechanical and mechatronic systems, automated systems and robotic devices, thermodynamic and combustion systems, fluid and thermal energy systems, materials and manufacturing equipment and process plant and materials handling systems. This is applied to manufacturing, land, sea and air transportation, electricity generation, mining, minerals and metals processing, food, agricultural and forest products processing, thermal and environmental control systems in buildings and industry and refrigeration and air conditioning systems. Applicants must have experience in the safety aspects of design and/or operation of machines, plant, systems or processes and with noise, airborne and waterborne emission controls to reduce environmental impact. NAVAL ARCHITECTURE Naval Architecture is multidisciplinary in nature but, at its simplest: A Naval Architect is a Ship Designer. To expand on this: A Naval Architect is a Professional Engineer who is responsible for the safe design and specification of ships, boats and marine structure, both civil and military, including merchant ships (cargo and passenger), warships, submarines and underwater vehicles, offshore structures (fixed and floating), high speed craft, workboats and pleasure craft. The Naval Architect can also be involved in, or manage, the construction, repair/refit or operation of such ships/ marine structures. STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING Structural Engineering is concerned with research, planning, design, construction, inspection, monitoring, maintenance, rehabilitation and demolition of permanent and temporary structures and structural systems and their components and with associated technical, economic, environmental, aesthetic and social aspects. Structures might include buildings, bridges, in-ground structures, footings, frameworks and space frames, including those for motor vehicles, space vehicles, ships, aeroplanes and cranes, composed of any structural material including composites and novel materials.
  • 20. 20 SPECIFIC AREAS OF PRACTICE If you also require registration in a specific area of practice, you may apply for it concurrently with your application for Chartered Status. However, you should note that the evidence of competency you offer in support of your application would then need to demonstrate that you have practiced independently in the specific area and, in some cases, that you have undertaken certain required professional development activities. For further information applicants should refer to www.nerb.org.au/areas-of-practice. Alternatively, please contact an Engineers Australia office for this information to be mailed to you. THE ENGINEERING REGISTRATION SYSTEM GENERAL A registration system that distinguishes areas of engineering service and lists registered practitioners provides a ready and reliable mean to confirm a practitioner’s competence. Registration enables government, industry and individual consumers to engage the appropriate professional person or team to perform the required engineering services. There are three occupational categories in the engineering work force – Professional Engineer, Engineering Technologist and Engineering Officer (Associate). Members in these categories cooperate in various ways to perform engineering services. Their activities and competencies are often closely inter-related and it is difficult, and sometimes artificial, to say where the responsibilities of one occupational category end and those of another begin. There are activities that could be undertaken in different circumstances by any member of the engineering team. Other activities are clearly the province of one occupational category and not of another – for example, the province of a Professional Engineer but not an Engineering Associate, or vice versa. This distinction will often be determined by the standard to which competency has been demonstrated against the Australian Engineering Competency Standards Stage 2. Some features of engineering are common to all three categories. All engineering is about the application of a distinctive body of knowledge, based on mathematics, science and technology. Engineering practice is integrated with business opportunity and risk management. Practice continually evolves in the light of new theories, new evidence and new experience, and specializes to a greater or lesser extent in particular fields of application. All registered engineering professionals observe a common Code of Ethics, undertake to accept responsibility for outcomes only within their area of competence and specifically commit to keeping up-to- date through continuing professional development to support their engagement in delivering engineering services. They deliver engineering outcomes that minimise adverse social, economic and environmental consequences, with due regard for the safety, health and welfare of the community. The full range of engineering services demands a broad spectrum of knowledge, skills and expertise from the engineering team which comprises Professional Engineers, Engineering Technologist and Engineering Associates. The national engineering registration system provides guidance on the scope of practice within its three occupational categories on the basis of the following distinguishing attributes. DISTINGUISHING ATTRIBUTES PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS Professional Engineers apply their lifelong learning, critical perception and engineering judgment to the performance of engineering services. They challenge current thinking and conceptualise alternative approaches, often engaging in research and development of new engineering principles, technologies and materials. Engineers apply their analytical skills and well developed grasp of scientific principles and engineering theory to design original and novel solutions to complex problems. Their disciplined and systematic approach to innovation and creativity, comprehension of risks and benefits and informed professional judgment enables them to select optimal solutions, justify and defend the selection to colleagues, clients and the community. Registered Professional Engineers can be expected to comprehend complexity, function independently and display leadership within multi-disciplinary and cross- cultural teams. Within their engineering discipline, they will optimise costs and benefits to clients and community within identified constraints, while achieving desired outcomes ethically, and within the context of a safe and sustainable environment. They accept ultimate responsibility for the selection and application of design tools, implementation strategies and overall integration and functionality of engineering projects and programs. ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGISTS Engineering Technologists exercise ingenuity, originality and understanding in adapting and applying technologies, developing related new technologies or applying scientific knowledge within their specialised technical environment. Their education, expertise and analytical skills equip them with a robust understanding of the theoretical and practical application of engineering and technical principles. Within their branch of technology, they contribute to the improvement of standards and codes of practice, and the adaptation of established technologies to new situations. Registered Engineering Technologists can be expected to determine interactions between a technology and the system in which it operates, recognise and take account of its suitability and manage associated technical risks.
  • 21. 21 Technologists accept responsibility for the detailed technological requirements of their engineering services with due regard to the fundamental properties and limitations of components and systems involved. They may lead and manage teams engaged in the inspection, approval and certification of designs, tests, installations and reliable operations. They identify problematic circumstances, take remedial action and keep colleagues, clients and community informed, while ensuring performance-based criteria are satisfied within a safe and sustainable environment. ENGINEERING OFFICERS (ASSOCIATES) Engineering Associates apply their detailed knowledge of standards and codes of practice to selecting, specifying, installing, commissioning, monitoring, maintaining, repairing and modifying complex assets such as structures, plant, equipment, components and systems. Their education, training and experience equip them with the necessary theoretical knowledge and analytical skills for testing, fault diagnosis and understanding the limitations of complex assets in familiar operating situations. Registered Engineering Associates can be expected to exercise engineering judgment within the scope of accepted standards and codes of practice to the design, inspection, certification, safe operation and cost- effectiveness of complex assets. They may supervise tradespeople, lead and manage teams and utilise advanced software and design aids to achieve practical and reliable designs, installations and operations of complex assets. INTERNATIONAL ARRANGEMENTS Becoming a Chartered Member of Engineers Australia may allow you to join overseas institutions without having to undertake further examination or interview. Engineers Australia has negotiated mutual recognition agreements with numerous overseas professional associations that provide reciprocal membership. This information can be found at www.engineersaustralia.org.au Engineers Australia is part of two multilateral international registers, the APEC Engineer Register and the EMF International Recognition agreement for Professional Engineers – IntPE (Aus). The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Engineer Register is an initiative of the Commonwealth Government and Engineers Australia to facilitate cross border mobility for Professional Engineers in the APEC region. An APEC Engineer Register has been established in Australia, Canada, Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, the United States of America and Russia. The Engineers Mobility Forum (EMF) has constituted an International Recognition Agreement for Professional Engineers. The International Register of Professional Engineers is operated in Australia, Canada, Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong China, India, Ireland, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore, Sri Lanka, South Africa, the UK and the USA. Engineers registered on the International Register may use the postnominal IntPE (Aus). A person who is registered on the National Professional Engineers Register (NPER) has already met, to a significant extent, the requirements for enrolment on the APEC Engineer Register or on the IntPE (Aus) Register. The APEC Handbook and Application Form can be found at www.nerb.org.au >Registers > International. COLLEGES Colleges represent the learned-society function of Engineers Australia. They are responsible for maintaining, extending and promoting the body of knowledge, formulating standards for accrediting university degree programs and practice competencies for admission to Chartered Status and Registration, providing expert members of accreditation and assessment panels, promoting discipline-specific continuing professional development, and mentoring the development of graduate engineers. There are currently eight Colleges of Engineers Australia: Biomedical, Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Environmental, Information Telecommunications and Electronics, Mechanical and Structural, which together broadly cover all areas of practice in engineering. When you apply for Chartered Status (CPEng, CEngT or CEngO), you should also nominate a College. This would indicate that you would be seeking Chartered Membership of this College, which covers your area of engineering practice. For example, you may have studied Mechanical Engineering but your work- related competencies could have been in Structural Engineering. Your nominated College would therefore be “Structural”. You are able to nominate more than one College, however, your EPR must show that you have gained experience in areas of practice covered by the College(s) you nominate.
  • 22. 22 APPENDIX C PART 1 - STAGE 2 COMPETENCY UNITS, ELEMENTS AND DEFINING ACTIVITIES UNIT C1: Engineering Practice COMPULSORY DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to apply a professional approach to a specific area of engineering practice. Element Defining Activities C1.1 Presents and develops a professional image a. Practises in a field of engineering, in accordance with the code of ethics, as a significant part of normal work duties b. Demonstrates use of appropriate engineering techniques and tools c. Produces outcomes that require innovative thought and intellectual rigour d. Publishes the outcomes of innovation in reports or professional papers e. Achieves recognition for engineering expertise from colleagues and clients f. Identifies opportunities to solve problems through applying engineering knowledge g. Demonstrates an awareness of environmental/community/political issues that would benefit from engineering input C1.2 Pursues continuing professional development a. Reviews own strengths and determines areas for development b. Plans for further professional development c. Undertakes engineering professional development activities d. Improves non engineering knowledge and skills to assist in achieving engineering outcomes C1.3 Integrates engineering with other professional input a. Interacts with appropriate professionals and specialists to achieve agreed outcomes and develop broader knowledge b. Seeks a range of information sources to develop and strengthen present engineering focus c. Challenges current practices to identify opportunities for improvement through a multi-disciplined, inter-cultural approach C1.4 Develops engineering solutions a. Identifies and proposes options to achieve engineering solutions b. Produces new concepts/design/solutions/methods c. Demonstrates the achievement of improvements in processes and outcomes d. Plans and manages the development of solutions e. Proposes means of testing, measuring and evaluating solutions f. Develops and applies new engineering practices on a regular basis C1.5 Identifies constraints on potential engineering solutions a. Identifies the interrelationship of social, physical, environmental, political, financial and cultural issues with the proposed engineering solutions b. Identifies professional risks, statutory responsibilities and liabilities c. Implements Occupational Health and Safety and other statutory requirements d. Identifies hazards and consequent risks, and initiates appropriate safety and disaster management measures e. Identifies long term environmental and sustainability issues associated with engineering activities NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
  • 23. 23 UNIT C2: Engineering Planning and Design COMPULSORY DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to be involved in the interpretation of requirements, apply engineering principles, conceptualise options and apply creativity to development of plans and designs that meet the client’s requirements. Element Defining Activities C2.1 Interprets and scopes design requirements a. Negotiates and interprets the client’s requirements b. Brings to the client’s attention the implications of sustainability and options for an improved environmental outcome c. Documents the requirements, negotiates and obtains agreement on acceptance criteria d. Analyses client requirements for the design criteria to ensure that all appropriate specification are included in the design requirements e. Reviews the design requirements by considering the impact of the plan/design of all development and implementation factors, including constraints and risks f. Selects and applies engineering standards and design specifications to write functional specifications which meet the requirements g. Defines and agrees the acceptance criteria with the client C2.2 Prepares concept proposal and seeks advice on latest technology a. Applies innovative approaches to the development of possible design concepts, responding to imperatives such as sustainability b. Investigates and analyses the possible design concepts to achieve the design requirements c. Seeks advice from appropriate personnel and sources where the concept proposal has non standard engineering requirements d. Collaborates with the client to adapt the plan/design brief/concept to improve outcomes and overcome possible problems e. Advises the client of the likely impacts on the community f. Seeks advice on the latest technologies C2.3 Implements planning and design process a. Arranges design tasks to meet the agreed outcomes and cost structure b. Analyses and selects resources/processes/systems to develop the plan or design c. Develops and checks the design solution using the engineering specification d. Creates (when appropriate) a demonstration model of the design e. Establishes documentation management process C2.4 Reviews the design to achieve acceptance a. Reviews the design to ensure that user requirements are met b. Informs the user of the likely impact on the user’s lifestyle c. Incorporates corrections and makes improvements to the design ensuring social responsibilities, such as sustainability, are met d. Reviews the design with the client to gain documented acceptance C2.5 Prepares and maintains documentation during the design process a. Ensures that the supporting documentation required to implement the design is accurate, concise, complete and clear b. Ensures that the designed item is identified by agreed design documentation/records c. Applies the agreed documentation control process when making changes to the design d. Ensures that the documentation for the design remains accurate and current during the design development C2.6 Validates design a. Prepares and implements plans to verify that completed physical work meets clients’requirements b. Develops periodic test schedules to monitor performance and enable others to take any corrective action necessary c. Seeks feedback from the commissioning process to facilitate corrective actions or improvements d. Evaluates the performance of the design outcome in the user’s environment using appropriate tools e. Evaluates community reaction to the design outcome NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
  • 24. 24 UNIT C3: Self-Management in the Engineering Workplace COMPULSORY DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to perform work competently, making judgments about work priorities and information requirements to achieve effective working relationships and engineering outcomes. Element Defining Activities C3.1 Manages self a. Manages own time and own processes b. Exercises initiative in the workplace c. Completes tasks in a competent and timely manner d. Demonstrates professional ethics as the opportunity occurs e. Copes with change C3.2 Works effectively with people a. Communicates effectively with others b. Recognises the value of cultural diversity and applies appropriate workplace practices for a viable workplace ecology c. Develops and maintains trust and confidence of colleagues, clients and suppliers through competent performance d. Seeks and values input from internal and external sources to enhance communication e. Mentors others in specific areas of engineering focus f. Builds and maintains network relationships that value and sustain a team ethic C3.3 Facilitates and capiltalises on change and innovation a. Initiates opportunities to introduce change b. Works with others to introduce change c. Develops creative and flexible approaches and solutions d. Manages emerging challenges and opportunities e. Manages in a manner to advance sustainability C3.4 Plans and manages work priorities and resources a. Prioritises competing demands to achieve personal, team and the organisation’s goals and objectives b. Prepares, monitors and reviews work plans, programs and budgets c. Plans resource use to achieve profit/productivity/sustainability/ environmental impact minimisation targets C3.5 Maintains customer focus and relationships with clients/ stakeholders/suppliers/regulators a. Identifies client needs b. Works in collaborative relationships with clients/suppliers in the planning and implementation of the project c. Demonstrates commercial awareness d. Manages the procurement process e. Negotiates to ensure that available capability meets requirements f. Provides regular and complete progress reports C3.6 Manages information a. Locates and reviews relevant information b. Applies relevant legislation, statutory requirements and standards c. Manages information relating to insurances, indemnities, and commercial instruments d. Documents processes and outcomes e. Analyses information NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
  • 25. 25 UNIT E1A: Engineering Business Management ELECTIVE DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to contribute to business strategies through the provision of specialist engineering knowledge and experience. Element Defining Activities E1A.1 Contributes to engineering business strategies a. Provides engineering analysis to contribute to the development of strategic plans and sustainability b. Integrates engineering objectives into business planning c. Seeks emergent business opportunities based upon engineering initiatives to create opportunities d. Works with others to develop engineering performance targets and financial plans e. Provides advice on engineering related costs and risks f. Implements processes to monitor and adjust team performance within the organisation’s continuous improvement policies g. Undertakes risk assessment within organisational guidelines h. Develops quality plans for engineering operations i. Applies whole of life costing E1A.2 Develops client relationships a. Plans to meet internal and external clients’engineering requirements b. Ensures delivery of quality engineering products and services c. Seeks client feedback on the delivery of engineering products and services d. Monitors, adjusts and reports on the client service received e. Assists customers to identify sustainable options and implications E1A.3 Manages the implementation of engineering plans within the business a. Allocates roles and responsibilities to staff to achieve engineering plans b. Provides engineering leadership c. Manages performance and standards d. Contributes to the solution of engineering problems e. Monitors strategic engineering plans, goals and targets f. Manages costs g. Manages safety and quality h. Manages environmental issues i. Manages risks and contingencies E1A.4 Manages resources a. Implements resources management plans b. Procures resources c. Manages asset maintenance d. Manages disposal, waste management and recycling plans e. Provides advice on engineering costs f. Contributes to the innovative management of resources E1A.5 Manages people a. Implements people management plans b. Monitors team and individual performance targets c. Participates in the selection of staff d. Ensures the provision of skills and competencies requested to meet business targets e. Manages the workplace culture so that staff work in a continual learning environment f. Ensures the adherence to ethical, OH&S and quality standards g. Provides performance feedback E1A.6 Manages suppliers a. Participates supplier selection b. Prepares documents for engagement of suppliers c. Plans and implements monitoring of suppliers E1A.7 Manages business information a. Indentifies and complies with all statutory reporting requirements b. Uses management information systems effectively to store and retrieve data for decision making c. Prepares and presents business plans/budgets in accordance with the organisation’s guidelines and requirements E1A.8 Monitors engineering business performance a. Establishes monitoring processes and feedback systems to ensure agreed targets are met b. Establishes monitoring and reporting processes to ensure statutory requirements are met c. Establishes and monitors processes so that continuous improvement is achieved at all levels of the business NOTE: AT LEAST FIVE ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally 5 out of 8 elements are demonstrated and claimed in one CER to fulfill the essential requirement of this Unit.
  • 26. 26 OR UNIT E1B: Engineering Project Management ELECTIVE DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to scope and manage engineering projects within a program of work ensuring that time, cost and quality are managed effectively and that progress is maintained to achieve the outcomes within and across a number of projects. Element Defining Activities E1B.1 Develops project integration a. Integrates the project with the business direction b. Manages communication across the project with all stakeholders c. Designs/agrees upon the documentation system across the project d. Manages integration of all aspects of project design e. Plans and manages the integration of the transition of each stage of the project cycle f. Relates the project to community aspirations g. Develops the Project Plan E1B.2 Scopes the project a. Collaborates with the clients/project owners and the team to define project deliverables for various phases within the project budget b. Identifies measurable outcomes to evaluate the project on completion c. Develops project scope and feasibility accessing other areas of expertise as required d. Defines parameters for the environmental management plan e. Manages the relation between project management and environmental management E1B.3 Manages people a. Implements people management plans b. Monitors team and individual performance targets c. Ensures that the project team has adequate skills and resources to achieve the project outcomes d. Participates in the selection of staff e. Manages the workplace culture so that staff work in a continual learning environment f. Discusses project scope and project objectives with those involved in the project g. Delegates the achievement of outcomes to ensure cost, time and material resources are appropriately allocated and applied h. Ensures the adherence to ethical, environmental, OH&S and quality standards i. Provides performance feedback j. Informs project members of the relationship of the project to other program outcomes E1B.4 Manages the physical resources within the project a. Develops resource, material conservation, recovery and waste management plans b. Defines project resource performance parameters in consultation with others c. Develops strategies to maintain the effective performance of the resources d. Initiates training programs for staff to monitor resource condition e. Diagnoses problems and identifies requirements for appropriate testing f. Establishes environmental and sustainability criteria for procurement of materials, equipment and services E1B.5 Manages quality, safety, environment and risk a. Initiating a quality program to ensure that outcomes are achieved to the required standard of quality specified in the contract b. Manages the reporting and documentation of quality and controls non- conformances c. Establishes plans for management of OH&S and Environmental Control d. Manages hazard identification and the prevention of accidents e. Manages remedial action and reporting when accidents occur f. Identifies risks, their potential impacts, and produces a risk minimisation plan
  • 27. 27 E1B.6 Manages cost and procurement a. Determines procurement requirements for the project b. Ensures that the procurement process conforms with all probity requirements c. Determines project budget and monitors and controls project costs d. Monitors the production of deliverables to ensure that cost trend deviations from budget are quickly identified and remedied e. Specifies contract requirements to achieve the project outcomes f. Reviews requested variations against contract terms and conditions, the agreed project outcomes and variations in project requirements or conditions g. Reviews and approves matters during any defects and liability periods E1B.7 Manages time and progress a. Determines and implements project programs b. Monitors project progress against programs and initiates remedial action if necessary c. Identifies and manages potential areas of conflict at the work site and between stakeholders, customers and regulators d. Monitors contracts against outcomes e. Keeps accurate records on all aspects of project progress including environmental conditions and performance reporting f. Communicates on project progress to the project team, clients, stakeholders and regulators E1B.8 Finalises the project a. Reviews and documents the project outcomes against the project requirements b. Establishes the acceptance criteria for the project in consultation with the client c. Plans the handover of the project NOTE: AT LEAST FIVE ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally 5 out of 8 elements are demonstrated and claimed in one CER to fulfill the essential requirement of this Unit.
  • 28. 28 UNIT E2: Engineering Operations ELECTIVE DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to manage or coordinate ongoing engineering operations and make decisions to optimise the performance of the plant/system in a dynamic environment. Element Defining Activities E2.1 Plans operations and systems a. Liaises with design, development and other related groups to develop the plant/system operational plan b. Takes a whole of life perspective when identifying future requirements and possible impacts on the plant/system/operation c. Confirms that the goal of the operation meets the organisation’s objectives d. Plans to optimise the flexibility and productivity of the operation e. Communicates engineering requirements and implications for financial planning f. Communicates the plan for the operation/plant/system to those involved in implementation or adaptation E2.2 Manages the process within the operation/system a. Specifies, procures and allocates resources required to carry out the processes b. Regulates process/system to control variation c. Implements logistics plan to ensure spares and parts are available d. Initiates corrective action to reduce variation and operational faults in the process or system e. Monitors processes and modifies them to achieve optimum outcomes f. Analyses the relative value of modifications to the system/process g. Advocates improvements to the operation to commercial managers and other stakeholders h. Manages sustainable environmental practices during the operation of the process/system E2.3 Manages the assets within the operation/system a. Defines asset performance parameters in consultation with others b. Develops maintenance strategies and maintenance implementation plans c. Prepares and manages whole of life costing d. Trains staff to implement condition monitoring e. Diagnoses faults and identifies requirements for appropriate technical testing f. Develops logistics and costings for the resources acquisition required to support the maintenance plan g. Plans for and implements the decommissioning and disposal of assets h. Develops an energy and resource minimisation plan E2.4 Manages people a. Ensures that the staff are trained in the operation of the process/system b. Briefs and coordinates work teams to operate the process/system c. Provides system/plant/operational procedures d. Reviews performance and competency development of operational teams e. Collaborates with and guides work teams to optimise the process/system f. Guides work teams to implement all OH&S practices E2.5 Measures and documents engineering operation/system a. Reviews outcomes of the process in terms of quality, cost and time against the operational plan b. Analyses productivity to determine where improvements can be made c. Develops system or work procedures required to operate and improve the process E2.6 Manages environmental performance a. Conducts regular environmental audits of processes/procedures and systems b. Devises energy demand management plan and monitoring c. Devises waste management plan and monitoring d. Devises water conservation plan and monitoring e. Devises materials conservation plan and monitoring f. Monitors and manages workplace environmental conditions and risks g. Devises environmental reporting structure and process NOTE: ELEMENT E2.2 AND AT LEAST FOUR OTHER ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
  • 29. 29 UNIT E3: Materials/Components/Systems ELECTIVE DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to select safe and sustainable materials, components and systems which are a part of solutions to engineering problems and meet client and community expectations. Element Defining Activities E3.1 Determines engineering requirements a. Determines fundamental project/operation parameters in consultation with the client b. Considers the characteristics of specific projects/operations with regard to materials, components and system requirements c. Determines and evaluates client and community expectations of the materials/components/systems used d. Identifies and evaluates factors affecting the selection of materials/ component/ systems including client and community expectations e. Determines a selection strategy that includes methods, costs and benefits f. Brings sustainable consequences and options to the client’s notice E3.2 Designs/develops materials/ components/systems a. Defines design requirements and environmental performance criteria for materials/components/systems b. Scopes the design and development process c. Gains acceptance of the specifications for material/components/ systems d. Plans for disposal/renewal/long term storage options e. Applies engineering principles to the development of the materials/ components/systems f. Tests the developed materials/components/ systems against the design requirements and environmental performance criteria prior to integration into the project/operation E3.3 Defines processes to prepare materials/components/systems for use in the project/operation a. Defines cost effective, sustainable and efficient methods for the preparation of materials/components/systems b. Schedules the access and preparation of materials/components/ systems c. Carries out tests using the selected methods to ensure agreed standards are achieved d. Determines interaction that may occur between materials/ components/systems within the operation/project e. Prepares certification reports on the characteristics and uses of materials/ components/systems f. Defines appropriate lifespan profiles for materials/components/systems E3.4 Manages the use of materials/ components/systems within the project/operation a. Maintains the material/components/systems according to the quality systems b. Reviews the performance of the material/components/systems against the required outcomes of the project/operation c. Applies and modifies procedures to ensure that the material/ component/system is protected from deterioration d. Researches new methods to improve performance and introduces new components/materials/systems according to the quality systems e. Reviews community satisfaction with the functionality, sustainability and aesthetics of the materials/systems used in the project/operation E3.5 Manages the recovery, reuse and disposal of materials/ components/ systems a. Defines a process for recovery and reusing the maximum amount of material b. Defines the process for disposal/long term storage, minimising materials to landfill and the production of greenhouse gas emissions c. Defines risks in material disposal d. Selects the appropriate engineering methods following a consideration of options e. Applies relevant legislation f. Documents the process of disposal/storage/renewal NOTE: ELEMENTS E3.1, E3.2 AND AT LEAST TWO OTHER ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT
  • 30. 30 UNIT E4A: Environmental Management ELECTIVE DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to examine and determine the environmental management requirements of engineering work. Element Defining Activities E4A.1 Determines the existing environmental condition a. Researches and reviews sustainable imperatives and environmental values for the engineering project area through consultation and research b. Develops/responds to and initiates briefs for environmental studies which adequately reflect the extent of required work c. Audits existing environmental condition and identifies priorities d. Scopes the environmental impact of any engineering intervention into the biophysical and socio-cultural environment e. Identifies probable environmental engineering outcomes for the specific parameters within the brief f. Records/reports on the findings of the initial assessment E4A.2 Establishes stakeholders’ expectations a. Consults with all major stakeholders to establish clear and agreed sustainability goals and objectives b. Determines expectations regarding each component of the environment c. Integrates environmental considerations and the imperative for sustainability with the overall outcome of the operation or project d. Identifies stakeholder views on specific options for environmental improvement and development of sustainability e. Records and reports on expectations for project/operation integration E4A.3 Reviews existing environmental conditions against stakeholders’expectations a. Determines variations between environmental and sustainability goals and the current condition of the environment b. Establishes the possibilities and options for the ongoing minimisation of environmental impacts, environmental regeneration and the development of sustainability c. Determines existing directions of project requirements against expectations E4A.4 Develops and ranks strategies to achieve sustainable development a. Develops options from professional and stakeholder advice b. Determines criteria to assess the feasibility of options c. Evaluates available options against assessment criteria to identify risks and priorities d. Provides an environmental report e. Develops and reports on strategies to implement preferred options E4A.5 Implements, monitors and evaluates strategies a. Implements strategies in consultation with appropriate stakeholders and communities b. Integrates environmental management plan and procedures into all aspects of engineering design and application c. Collects and reviews data on implementation of strategies d. Evaluates progress and reviews strategies e. Reviews outcomes with stakeholders NOTE: ELEMENTS E4A.1, E4A.2, E4A.3 AND AT LEAST ONE OTHER ELEMENT MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT This unit is MANDATORY for candidates seeking Environmental College membership and registration on the National Engineering Registers (NPER, NTER or NEAR) in the General Area of Practice of Environmental Engineering. The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally all 4 Elements are demonstrated and claimed in one CER to demonstrate the ability to manage the key components of environmental management of a project in its entirety.
  • 31. 31 OR UNIT E4B: Investigation and Reporting ELECTIVE DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to identify and respond to opportunities for engineering investigation and to make recommendations that solve engineering problems or improve present applications. Element Defining Activities E4B.1 Responds to/Identifies problems a. Redefines problems as necessary b. Identifies opportunities for engineering investigations and the likely stakeholders c. Identifies sources of appropriate knowledge d. Develops/acts on a brief to carry out the investigation e. Researches relevant information, seeking input from stakeholders f. Confirms likely scope of investigation and possible engineering applications with the relevant stakeholders by developing acceptance criteria E4B.2 Plans the investigation a. Assesses likely resources required for the investigation b. Costs the investigation c. Identifies and plans interaction with stakeholders d. Provides a structure for review which may lead to recommendations for other projects e. Sets sustainability objectives and priorities f. Produces a program of activities for the investigation g. Determines method of approach h. Ensures that the necessary resources are available i. Liaises with other organizations and individuals who may be affected by/or who are involved in the investigation j. Defines and agrees upon acceptance criteria and direction with stakeholders E4B.3 Carries out the investigation a. Researches and analyses to isolate problems b. Reflects on the definition of problems to ensure accurate definition c. Identifies the technological requirements for the investigation d. Develops initial options for action e. Integrates both the engineering and possible multi-disciplinary issues into the research to achieve a sustainable solution f. Identifies hazards and risks g. Applies scientific methodologies taking into account the legal, financial, health and environmental requirements h. Reviews and improves the brief continuously i. Completes the investigation ensuring that all relevant factors have been taken into account E4B.4 Draws conclusions and makes recommendations a. Synthesises information and develops creative recommendations b. Considers all aspects of the research in developing conclusions c. Costs the recommendations d. Reviews the development of conclusions with stakeholders e. Seeks feedback on deliverables to ensure that the brief is satisfied NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally all 4 Elements are demonstrated and claimed sequentially in one CER to provide the required continuity of events.
  • 32. 32 UNIT E5: Research and Development and Commercialisation ELECTIVE DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to identify opportunities for Research & Development (R&D), identify commercial opportunities for the outcomes and to plan and design the research. Research is a significant aspect of the work and may involve pure research as well as applied research. Element Defining Activities E5.1 Indentifies opportunities for new or improves processes and/ or products a. Identifies and documents opportunities for the engineering application or adaptation of new concepts, products or technologies b. Analyses situations or required outcomes, in consultation with potential clients and other stakeholders, to determine justification for research c. Defines the process for initial background documentation and literature review d. Identifies emerging risks of pursuing or rejecting the opportunity e. Identifies potential benefits and tangible outcomes of the research and development opportunity f. Identifies how sustainability can drive innovation and improvement in process and products E5.2 Identifies the resources required for the R&D a. Scopes the R&D concept to develop project objectives in terms of results and time lines b. Formulates and submits cost estimates of development, design, methodology, procedures, research and analysis c. Defines research deliverables in terms of specific measurable results by stages of the research d. Conducts R&D scoping under the direction of environmental management requirements E5.3 Initiates concept development a. Determines preliminary strategic objectives and priorities being addressed by the research b. Refines the research process required through a collaborative process to ensure that all parties that could have a potential interest have an opportunity to express their interest c. Identifies the extent and combination of fundamental or applied research d. Analyses the impact of emerging engineering methods, technologies, processes and hypotheses to refine the R&D concept e. Scopes the R&D concept to develop project objectives in terms of results and time limits f. Clarifies commitment to the concept with all parties directly involved g. Develops the concept in relation to the imperatives of sustainability E5.4 Gains commitment to the R&D proposal a. Prepares formal application for research funds together with supporting documents b. Identifies commercial opportunities for R&D application E5.5 Ensures research is undertaken a. Establishes R&D project management b. Identifies a research focus, conducts tests and identifies information for general application c. Methodically measures and records research project parameters d. Communicates and monitors R&D progress e. Ensures R&D continues to provide innovative engineering applications/ systems/ processes f. Ensures regulatory and legal requirements are addressed g. Analyses recorded results and develops conclusions h. Reports results with analysis of their significance to the underlying engineering problem i. Prepares demonstrations (models or prototypes) of the R&D outcomes E5.6 Collaborates in the commercialisation of research outcomes a. Collaborates with others to review the costs and benefits of R&D b. Provides recommendations for the implementation of R&D based on commercial analysis c. Consults on the development of projects that are implementing R&D outcomes d. Provides engineering advice on specific aspects of commercialisation such as regulatory and legal requirements, pricing, distribution and promotion e. Consults to transfer new technology into commercial production NOTE: ELEMENTS E5.1, E5.2, E5.3, E5.4 AND AT LEAST ONE OTHER ELEMENT MUST BE ADDRESSED IN ORDER TO SATISFY THIS UNIT The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally all 5 Elements are demonstrated and claimed in one CER to demonstrate competency in the key components of a research project.
  • 33. 33 UNIT E6: Source and Estimate Materials ELECTIVE DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to define requirements, estimate the material required and identify appropriate sources to access the material from. Element Defining Activities E6.1 Defines requirements and sources for materials a. Defines the scope and parameters for the estimate following interpretation of technical information b. Brings to the client’s attention the sustainable implications and options c. Analyses estimate requirements in consultation with interested parties d. Compares options for materials against technical requirements e. Determines and evaluates community expectations of the aesthetics and functionality of the materials used in the project/operation f. Identifies options and costs to sources of materials E6.2 Estimates material a. Carries out calculations to ensure the currency and accuracy of the figures and rates used b. Defines cost effective sustainable and efficient methods for the preparation of materials/components/systems c. Calculates estimates using the correct units in accordance with specification requirements and procedures d. Determines interaction that my occur between materials/components/ systems within the operation/project e. Documents and presents estimates to meet the initial requirement E6.3 Procures material/resources a. Uses ordering documentation to identify materials and components for purchasing b. Orders materials and components c. Maintains ordering and purchasing documentation E6.4 Prepares materials/ components/systems for use in the project/operation a. Defines cost effective sustainable and efficient methods for the preparation of materials b. Schedules the access and preparation of materials c. Carries out tests using the selected methods to ensure agreed standards are achieved d. Determines interaction that may occur between materials within the operation/ project e. Prepares certification reports on the characteristics and uses of materials f. Accepts or rejects materials NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally all 4 Elements are demonstrated and claimed in one CER to demonstrate competency in the key components of the subject engineering function.
  • 34. 34 UNIT E7: Change and Technical Development ELECTIVE DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to implement technical developments and act as a catalyst for the implementation of technical innovation so that improvements in products and services are achieved. Element Defining Activities E7.1 Participation in planning the introduction of technical change a. Contributes effectively in the product/service planning processes to introduce technical improvements/change b. Identifies opportunities for technical improvements in products and systems c. Consults with designated individuals/groups to introduce technical and operational improvements/change d. Explains the business objective and plans to justify technical change to products/services/systems E7.2 Develops technically creative and flexible approaches and solutions a. Identifies and analyses alternative approaches to managing technical problems b. Assesses risks and ensures an environmentally sustainable position is taken to achieve technical improvements with a recognised benefit or advantage to the organisation c. Participate in the workplace by promoting the development of innovative approaches to achieve technical outcomes d. Reviews resource management to improve productivity and/or reduce costs E7.3 Manages emerging technical challenges and opportunities a. Responds to the changing technical needs of customers/stakeholders b. Keeps individuals/teams informed of progress in the implementation of technical changes c. Negotiates and implements recommendations for improving the methods/ techniques to manage technical change NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally all 3 Elements are demonstrated and claimed in one CER to provide the required sequence of events.
  • 35. 35 UNIT E8: Technical Sales and Promotion ELECTIVE DESCRIPTOR: This Unit requires members of the engineering team to identify opportunities for the sale of technical products/systems and provide technical product information to internal and external clients. Element Defining Activities E8.1 Identifies sales opportunities a. Identifies potential clients b. Establishes contact with clients through providing information on technical products related to their processes/product c. Seeks information on potential client concerns or awareness of shortcomings in present processes d. Researches to identify future technical and market trends e. Identifies opportunities to present the features and the benefits of the technical product/process E8.2 Applies product knowledge to client requirements a. Analyses the client’s process/service/product to identify areas for improvement b. Assists the client to specify their requirements c. Provides information on the technical product/process to meet the client’s acknowledged requirements or likely future requirements d. Promotes the environmental and energy factors of the product e. Trains clients in applying technical products E8.3 Promotes technical capability of the product/system a. Provides internal sales staff with information on the technical capability of the product/system b. Develops and presents product/system promotional information c. Attends and contributes to industry conferences in the area of product/ system specialisation E8.4 Seeks client feedback a. Contacts clients to establish satisfaction with the product b. Reviews and acts on feedback c. Communicates with other staff to review process and improve service where required d. Provides ongoing client support as required NOTE: ALL ELEMENTS MUST BE ADDRESSED TO SATISFY THIS UNIT The nature of this elective Unit, referring to the Descriptor above, requires that normally all 4 Elements are demonstrated and claimed in one CER to demonstrate competency in the key components of the subject engineering function.