MBTI Step II Forum: Your Questions Answered

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MBTI Step II Forum: Your Questions Answered

  1. 1. MBTI® Step IITM Forum: YourQuestions AnsweredSherrie Haynie, M.Ed.
  2. 2. Sherrie Haynie serves as a consultantfor CPP, Inc. She is an MBTI® MasterPractitioner and MBTI® CertificationProgram faculty member. She currentlyconsults with a multitude of Fortune 500businesses of all sizes. In addition toproviding MBTI certification training,Sherrie develops and facilitates ODinitiatives for leadership, coaching,team building, performancemanagement, and strategic planning.With a focus on organizational results,Sherrie previously consulted for GM,Ford Motor Company, Delta Airlines,and Wayne State University.© 2012 CPP, Inc. All rights reserved 2About the Speaker: Sherrie Haynie,M.Ed.
  3. 3. © 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved 3Agenda Uses and Benefits of Step II Assessment Overview of Step II Results Your Questions…Answered Case Study: Working Through Interesting Results Resources to Guide You Special Promotion
  4. 4. 4MBTI® Step ITM and Step IITM RefresherForm M (Step I): 93 items Produces only Step I results Available in a range of formatsForm Q (Step II): 144 items (including the 93 Step I items) Produces Step I and Step II results Must be computer scored to produce Step II results© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved
  5. 5. 5Uses of the MBTI® Step IITM Tool Clarifying an unclearpreference Affirming an individual’sunique way of expressinghis or her type Focusing on potentialareas for development© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved
  6. 6. Benefits of the Step II AssessmentStep II results help with three issuespractitioners sometimes face:
  7. 7. 7BenefitsBenefit #1 Some people do not have all the attributes associated with a typepreference.– For example, Extraversion–Introversion items explore: Sociability Activity level Expressiveness Initiative– If you have a preference for Extraversion, the type descriptionimplies that you have ALL the characteristics associated with thatpreference.– We know this is not always the case.© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved
  8. 8. 8Benefits (Continued)Benefit #2 Some people have unclear preferences on one or more dichotomies.– This is often associated with a low pci or pcc.Benefit #3 Step I results do not report within-type differences.– Individuals within a particular type are not all alike. While theyshare many similarities, they also have differences.– Step II results often resolve these issues.© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved
  9. 9. 9MBTI® Step IITM Facets Facets are components of the four dichotomies. They provide insight into an individual’s distinctive ways ofexpressing type. Particular patterns of facets within a dichotomy may reflectways in which less preferred aspects of personality areexpressed.© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved
  10. 10. Overview of the MBTI® Step IITMResults
  11. 11. 11In-Preference Results Facet scores in the 2–5 range are considered to be “inkeeping” with the underlying preference. High levels of agreement are expected with the behavioraldescription associated with that side, or pole, of the facet. Occasionally, clients disagree. This may be because of therelatively few items contributing to a facet score.© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedMBTI® Step IITM Manual, pp. 58–67
  12. 12. 12Midzone ResultsA facet score of 0 or 1 (on either side) is no better or worsethan any other result. Possible reasons for such a score:– Situational use of each of the poles of the facet– Habitual use of both poles of the facet– Ambivalence about which pole to use© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedMBTI® Step IITM Manual, pp. 58–67
  13. 13. 13Out-of-Preference ResultsA facet score of 2–5 on the side opposite your overallpreference on the dichotomy: Identifies how you may be different from othersof your type May reflect long-standing individual behavioral habits May result from training or individual development© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedMBTI® Step IITM Manual, pp. 58–67
  14. 14. Your Questions Answered
  15. 15. 15Your Questions AnsweredHow do you effectivelydebrief when there aremore out-of-preferencefacets than in-preferencefacets?© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved
  16. 16. 16E–I Facets© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedInitiatingExpressiveGregariousActiveEnthusiasticReceivingContainedIntimateReflectiveQuietBasic approach to connectingwith othersHow readily we communicate ouremotional states and experienceBreadth and depth of ourconnectionsHow we prefer tolearnLevel and kind of energy we bringto exchanges with othersSource: From the MBTI® Step II™ Training ProgramFacilitator’s Guide, (Mountain View, CA: CPP, Inc.).Copyright 2008 by CPP, Inc. Further reproduction isprohibited without the publisher’s written consent.
  17. 17. 17The Whole Is Greater Than the Sum ofthe Parts© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedSource: From the MBTI® Step II™ Training ProgramFacilitator’s Guide, (Mountain View, CA: CPP, Inc.).Copyright 2008 by CPP, Inc. Further reproduction isprohibited without the publisher’s written consent.The facets are somecomponents of thepreferences, but theydo not “add up” tothe preferences.
  18. 18. 18The Five E–I Facets Together Do NotEqual the Preference Pair© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedInitiating–ReceivingExpressive–ContainedActive–Reflective++Gregarious–Intimate++ Enthusiastic–QuietExtraversion–IntroversionPreferenceSource: From the MBTI® Step II™ Training ProgramFacilitator’s Guide, (Mountain View, CA: CPP, Inc.).Copyright 2008 by CPP, Inc. Further reproduction isprohibited without the publisher’s written consent.
  19. 19. 19Item Overlap Between Form M andForm Q© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedSource: From the MBTI® Step II™ Manual by NaomiL. Quenk, Allen L. Hammer, and Mark S. Majors,(Mountain View, CA: CPP, Inc.). Copyright 2001 byPeter B. Myers and Katharine D. Myers. Furtherreproduction is prohibited without the publisher’swritten consent.
  20. 20. 20Item Overlap Between Form M andForm Q© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedSource: From the MBTI® Step II™ Manual by NaomiL. Quenk, Allen L. Hammer, and Mark S. Majors,(Mountain View, CA: CPP, Inc.). Copyright 2001 byPeter B. Myers and Katharine D. Myers. Furtherreproduction is prohibited without the publisher’swritten consent.
  21. 21. 21Your Questions AnsweredWhat is the best way to succinctly definethe 40 facet poles?© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved
  22. 22. 22Your Questions AnsweredI recall learning that ENFPs aretypically out-of-preference on afacet pertaining to some sort ofcritical thinking preference. Imcurious about whether you seepatterns across the 16 types.Within each type, what aresome of the patterns forfacets that are out-of-preference?© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved
  23. 23. 23Common Out-of-Preference Results© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedENFPSource: From the MBTI® Step II™ Manual by NaomiL. Quenk, Allen L. Hammer, and Mark S. Majors,(Mountain View, CA: CPP, Inc.). Copyright 2001 byPeter B. Myers and Katharine D. Myers. Furtherreproduction is prohibited without the publisher’swritten consent.
  24. 24. 24Common Out-of-Preference Results© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedESTJSource: From the MBTI® Step II™ Manual by NaomiL. Quenk, Allen L. Hammer, and Mark S. Majors,(Mountain View, CA: CPP, Inc.). Copyright 2001 byPeter B. Myers and Katharine D. Myers. Furtherreproduction is prohibited without the publisher’swritten consent.
  25. 25. 25Common Out-of-Preference Results© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedISFPSource: From the MBTI® Step II™ Manual by NaomiL. Quenk, Allen L. Hammer, and Mark S. Majors,(Mountain View, CA: CPP, Inc.). Copyright 2001 byPeter B. Myers and Katharine D. Myers. Furtherreproduction is prohibited without the publisher’swritten consent.
  26. 26. 26Interpreter’s Summary, p. 18© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedSource: From the MBTI® Step II™ Training ProgramFacilitator’s Guide, (Mountain View, CA: CPP, Inc.).Copyright 2008 by CPP, Inc. Further reproduction isprohibited without the publisher’s written consent. PCI Same-TypeComparisons Polarity Index OmittedResponses
  27. 27. 27Your Questions AnsweredI use the Step II tool in largegroup sessions. The exercises Ido are primarily just to help myclients differentiate along theStep I preferences.Do you have any goodexercises you can share thatdemonstrate differences onsub-facets?© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved
  28. 28. 28Your Questions AnsweredWhen doing a workshop for, say,20 people, how much time shouldbe allotted for introducing theStep II tool? Does it take moretime than the Step 1 tool?© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved
  29. 29. Sample Step II Training Agenda 15-20 mins Introduction and Icebreaker 25-40 mins The First Step: MBTI Step I Introducing the Preferences Examining Your Reported Type 35-40 mins Exploring the Next Level: MBTI Step II Introducing the Facets 10-20 mins Looking at Your MBTI Step II Results Overview of MBTI Step II Results In-Preference, Out-of-Preference, and MidzoneResults© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved 29Source: Jean M. Kummerow and Naomi L. Quenk,Working with MBTI® Step II™ Results, (Mountain View,CA: CPP, Inc., 2004). Further reproduction isprohibited without the publisher’s written consent.
  30. 30. Sample Step II Training Agenda (Cont.) 2-4 hrs Understanding the Facets E/I Facets (Activity) Relationship between Step I and Step II S/N Facets (Activity) T/F Facets (Activity) J/P Facets (Activity) 10-20 mins Putting it All Together Summary of the Facets How to Approach Unusual Patterns (Activity) 50-60 mins Exploring Decision-Making Styles(optional activity) 5-15 mins Closing the Training Session© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved 30Source: Jean M. Kummerow and Naomi L. Quenk, Working with MBTI® Step II™ Results, (MountainView, CA: CPP, Inc., 2004). Further reproduction is prohibited without the publisher’s written consent.
  31. 31. 31Your Questions AnsweredHow do I use the MBTI StepII assessment as part of ourcomprehensive LeadershipDevelopment program?© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved
  32. 32. Leadership Decision-Making Model© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved 32Concrete: What do we know? How do weknow it?Realistic: What are the real costs?Practical: Will it work?Experiential: Can you show me howit works?Traditional: Does anything reallyneed changing?Abstract: What else could this mean?Imaginative: What else can we come upwith?Conceptual: What other interesting ideasare there?Theoretical: How is it all interconnected?Original: What is a new way to do this?Empathetic: What do we like and dislike?Compassionate: What impact will this have onpeople?Accommodating: How can we make everyonehappy?Accepting: What is beneficial in this?Tender: What about the people who will behurt?SENSING INTUITIONTHINKING FEELINGSource: Jean M. Kummerow and Naomi L. Quenk, Working with MBTI® Step II™ Results, (Mountain View,CA: CPP, Inc., 2004). Further reproduction is prohibited without the publisher’s written consent.Logical: What are the pros and cons?Reasonable: What are the logicalconsequences?Questioning: But what about …?Critical: What is wrong with this?Tough: Why aren’t we following throughnow?
  33. 33. 33Your Questions AnsweredWe are using the Step IIassessment for leadershipdevelopment along with theYOU book to focus on strengthsand opportunities.Any advice on how tomaximize the developmentopportunities?© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved
  34. 34. 34Case Study: Sam Sample© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedSource: From the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® Step II™ Interpretive Report byNaomi L. Quenk, Ph.D. and Jean M. Kummerow, Ph.D., (Mountain View, CA: CPP,Inc.). Copyright 2001, 2003 by Peter B. Myers and Katharine D. Myers. Furtherreproduction is prohibited without the publisher’s written consent.ISTJ-Sam SampleS–N Facet Scores
  35. 35. 35Case Study: Sam Sample© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedT–F Facet ScoresISTJ-Sam SampleSource: From the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® Step II™ Interpretive Report byNaomi L. Quenk, Ph.D. and Jean M. Kummerow, Ph.D., (Mountain View, CA: CPP,Inc.). Copyright 2001, 2003 by Peter B. Myers and Katharine D. Myers. Furtherreproduction is prohibited without the publisher’s written consent.
  36. 36. What’s Next for Continued Learning?
  37. 37. 37MBTI® Step IITM Training Program Learn how to ethically administer theStep II assessment Use the MBTI® Step II™ InterpretiveReport Apply Step II results to improveleadership development, coaching,and team buildingSchedule:Chicago, IL May 2012Nashville, TN July 2012For more information and to register,visit: www.cpp.com/mbtistepII.© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reservedGain a deeper understanding of personality type
  38. 38. 38MBTI® Step IITM Resources MBTI® Step II™ ManualN. L. Quenk, A. L. Hammer, & M. S. Majors MBTI® Step II™ User’s GuideJ. M. Kummerow & N. L. Quenk Working with MBTI® Step II™Results (binder)J. M. Kummerow & N. L. Quenk Understanding Your MBTI® StepII™ ResultsJ. M. Kummerow & N. L. Quenk MBTI® Step IITM ManualSupplementwww.cpp.com/mbtivalidity© 2012, CPP, Inc. All rights reserved
  39. 39. 39MBTI, Step I, Step II, and the MBTI logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of the MBTI Trust, Inc. The CPP logo is a registered trademark of CPP, Inc.Thank YouContact us for more information:800-624-1765custserv@cpp.comwww.cpp.com

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