Police Report Writing

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  • Investigators are people who look into events or situations to find the facts about what happened. They: Ask questions and interview View crime scenes Collect evidence Develop informants Document their investigations An investigation means different things to different people. For our class, it is looking for the truth about what happened. An investigation begins when a crime has occurred, there is a reasonable certainty that a crime has occurred or an investigator is reasonably certain that a crime is going to occur.
  • Police Report Writing

    1. 1. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E. Foster Principles of InvestigationsPrinciples of Investigations and Report Writingand Report Writing Criminal InvestigationsCriminal Investigations
    2. 2. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Principles of Investigations andPrinciples of Investigations and Report WritingReport Writing AA criminalcriminal investigationinvestigation isis only as goodonly as good asas the report thatthe report that supports it.supports it.
    3. 3. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Investigation BasicsInvestigation Basics  Who is anWho is an investigator?investigator?  What is anWhat is an Investigation?Investigation?  When does anWhen does an Investigation BeginInvestigation Begin
    4. 4. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Basic Legal Beginning of anBasic Legal Beginning of an investigation.investigation.  Probable causeProbable cause -- Probable cause means thatProbable cause means that police must have apolice must have a reasonable belief that areasonable belief that a crimecrime has beenhas been committed,committed, or is being committed, byor is being committed, by the suspectthe suspect  Reasonable Suspicion –Reasonable Suspicion – an objectively justifiablean objectively justifiable suspicion that is based onsuspicion that is based on specific facts orspecific facts or circumstances and thatcircumstances and that justifies stopping andjustifies stopping and sometimes searching asometimes searching a personperson may bemay be involved ininvolved in criminal activitycriminal activity
    5. 5. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Basics of Report Writing SkillsBasics of Report Writing Skills  Write in the firstWrite in the first person.person.  Use chronologicalUse chronological order.order.  Use past tense.Use past tense.  Use active voice.Use active voice.  Use correct spellingUse correct spelling and punctuation.and punctuation.  Use correct subject/Use correct subject/ verb agreement.verb agreement.  Use correct pronounUse correct pronoun reference.reference.  Avoid jargon andAvoid jargon and wordiness.wordiness.  Write facts rather thanWrite facts rather than opinions.opinions.  Choose the correctChoose the correct word to describe theword to describe the incident.incident.  Organize the report byOrganize the report by using openings,using openings, paragraphs, andparagraphs, and headings.headings.
    6. 6. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E QualityQuality ““The best investigation is only as good as theThe best investigation is only as good as the report completed about it. A quality report is anreport completed about it. A quality report is an effective report, and to qualify as effective it musteffective report, and to qualify as effective it must be:be:  CompleteComplete  ClearClear  ConciseConcise  Accurate”Accurate”  Police Magazine,Police Magazine, May 1997May 1997
    7. 7. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Note TakingNote Taking  Purpose:Purpose:  Record storageRecord storage  Building BlocksBuilding Blocks  Aid to MemoryAid to Memory  Mechanics of Note TakingMechanics of Note Taking  ReadableReadable  AccurateAccurate  ConciseConcise
    8. 8. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Notes to SentencesNotes to Sentences  0700 rec’d call, 459 now, 123 N. Main0700 rec’d call, 459 now, 123 N. Main Street.Street.  0710 arrvd scene0710 arrvd scene  0711 PR R. Foster (3-16-59) arrvd busins,0711 PR R. Foster (3-16-59) arrvd busins, 0645, frnt door open.0645, frnt door open.
    9. 9. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Sentences to ReportsSentences to Reports On February 6, 2005, I was assigned toOn February 6, 2005, I was assigned to uniformed patrol, unit 1A12. At 0700 hours,uniformed patrol, unit 1A12. At 0700 hours, I received a call of a burglary in progress atI received a call of a burglary in progress at 123 North Main Street.123 North Main Street.
    10. 10. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E ReportsReports Source of Activity:Source of Activity: On February 6, 2005, I was assigned to uniformedOn February 6, 2005, I was assigned to uniformed patrol, unit 1A12. At 0700 hours, I received apatrol, unit 1A12. At 0700 hours, I received a call of a burglary in progress at 123 North Maincall of a burglary in progress at 123 North Main Street.Street. Observations:Observations: At 0710 hours, I arrived on scene were I was metAt 0710 hours, I arrived on scene were I was met by the Person Reporting, Raymond Foster.by the Person Reporting, Raymond Foster. Foster told me that he arrived at his place ofFoster told me that he arrived at his place of business (123 N. Main Street) at 0645 hours andbusiness (123 N. Main Street) at 0645 hours and found the front door of the business open.found the front door of the business open.
    11. 11. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Tell the StoryTell the Story What happened?What happened? Create a mental picture soCreate a mental picture so the reader knows what happened.the reader knows what happened. The reader:The reader: SupervisorSupervisor DetectivesDetectives VictimVictim District AttorneyDistrict Attorney WitnessesWitnesses JudgeJudge Defense AttorneyDefense Attorney YouYou
    12. 12. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Write in First PersonWrite in First Person  To make reports easier to read and toTo make reports easier to read and to understand, most department ask officers tounderstand, most department ask officers to write in the FIRST PERSON.write in the FIRST PERSON.  The writer of the report refers to himself/herselfThe writer of the report refers to himself/herself asas I,I, and uses the first person pronounsand uses the first person pronouns me, my,me, my, andand minemine..  The more formal third personThe more formal third person this officerthis officer,, reporting officer (R/Oreporting officer (R/O) or) or this writerthis writer reference isreference is old-fashioned and unacceptable in modernold-fashioned and unacceptable in modern law enforcementlaw enforcement..
    13. 13. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Missing InformationMissing Information Missing information can be used to inferMissing information can be used to infer that you are:that you are:  Not very professionalNot very professional  Not ThoroughNot Thorough  Do not have certain expertiseDo not have certain expertise  Not TruthfulNot Truthful
    14. 14. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Write in Chronological OrderWrite in Chronological Order  Chronological order is order by time. YourChronological order is order by time. Your report should tell what happened in thereport should tell what happened in the order that the events took place.  order that the events took place.    Get all the facts and then list them in theGet all the facts and then list them in the order in which they happened. It is muchorder in which they happened. It is much easier to understand what happened if theeasier to understand what happened if the details are written in chronological order,details are written in chronological order, even if the people involved do noteven if the people involved do not telltell youyou the information in chronological order.the information in chronological order.
    15. 15. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Write in the Past TenseWrite in the Past Tense  Everything you write in your report has alreadyEverything you write in your report has already happened, so use the past tense.happened, so use the past tense.  In present tense, you would write:In present tense, you would write: The suspect livesThe suspect lives at 1010 Swanson Courtat 1010 Swanson Court.. A defense attorney mightA defense attorney might ask: “Does the suspect still live there?”ask: “Does the suspect still live there?” It’s likely you will have to say that you do not know. IfIt’s likely you will have to say that you do not know. If you have to say, “I don’t know” many times, you willyou have to say, “I don’t know” many times, you will destroy your credibility. If you write in past tense, youdestroy your credibility. If you write in past tense, you can say that what is in the report was correct at thecan say that what is in the report was correct at the time you wrote the report.time you wrote the report.
    16. 16. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Past TensePast Tense  Do notDo not use the emphatic form (the worduse the emphatic form (the word diddid) in) in combination with other action words (verbs).combination with other action words (verbs). This form implies that something else happened.This form implies that something else happened.  Incorrect:Incorrect: I did issue a citation. (But it was ignored.)I did issue a citation. (But it was ignored.)  Correct:Correct: I issued a citation.I issued a citation.  Incorrect:Incorrect: Markly did say that Norman had a gun.Markly did say that Norman had a gun. (But later he changed his statement.)(But later he changed his statement.)  Correct:Correct: Markly said that Norman had a gun.Markly said that Norman had a gun.
    17. 17. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Basic English RulesBasic English Rules Or, the what your teachersOr, the what your teachers have been telling you forhave been telling you for years!years!
    18. 18. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E AntecedentAntecedent  Basic Principle:Basic Principle: A pronoun usually refers to somethingA pronoun usually refers to something earlier in the report (itsearlier in the report (its antecedentantecedent) and) and must agree in number — singular/plural —must agree in number — singular/plural — with the thing to which it refers.with the thing to which it refers.
    19. 19. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Spelling and PunctuationSpelling and Punctuation Basic Principle:Basic Principle: Spelling always counts!Spelling always counts! Avoid looking –Avoid looking – StupidStupid CarelessCareless UnprofessionalUnprofessional UneducatedUneducated
    20. 20. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Use an Active VoiceUse an Active Voice  Every sentence has a subject and a verb.Every sentence has a subject and a verb. Active Voice:Active Voice: When the subject performs theWhen the subject performs the action of the verb.action of the verb.  Active voice:Active voice: II askedasked the man about the brokenthe man about the broken mirror. mirror.  Passive Voice:Passive Voice: When the action is done to theWhen the action is done to the subject. The subject receives the action of thesubject. The subject receives the action of the verb.verb.  Passive voice: ThePassive voice: The firefire was reportedwas reported by the child.by the child.  Reports should be written in active voiceReports should be written in active voice whenever possible.whenever possible.
    21. 21. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Use Active VoiceUse Active Voice  The report wasThe report was written by Officerwritten by Officer Jackson.Jackson.  Passive voicePassive voice  Seven wordsSeven words  Officer Jackson wroteOfficer Jackson wrote the report.the report.  Active voiceActive voice  Five wordsFive words  If you save two wordsIf you save two words per sentence, in a fiveper sentence, in a five paragraph report, youparagraph report, you will savewill save approximately 40approximately 40 words.words.
    22. 22. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Subject/Verb AgreementSubject/Verb Agreement  Singular subjects require a singular verb. (Note:Singular subjects require a singular verb. (Note: Verbs that end inVerbs that end in ss are singular!)are singular!)  II waswas notnot awareaware of the new procedure.of the new procedure.  A plural subject must have a plural verb.A plural subject must have a plural verb.  TheyThey werewere sent to the hospital.sent to the hospital.  The pronoun “you” always requires a plural verb.The pronoun “you” always requires a plural verb.  YouYou werewere never good at telling a lie.never good at telling a lie.  YouYou allall werewere to finish the exercise before you left theto finish the exercise before you left the class.class.
    23. 23. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Subject/Verb AgreementSubject/Verb Agreement  Singular (He/ She)Singular (He/ She)  IsIs  WasWas  HasHas  DoesDoes  KnowsKnows  WantsWants  Plural (They)Plural (They)  AreAre  WereWere  HaveHave  DoDo  KnowKnow  WantWant
    24. 24. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Subject/Verb AgreementSubject/Verb Agreement  Collective nouns are words which indicateCollective nouns are words which indicate a group (like committee, jury, department,a group (like committee, jury, department, squad).squad).  If the noun is used to show the group as anIf the noun is used to show the group as an entity or whole (one), use the singular verb.entity or whole (one), use the singular verb.  TheThe juryjury waswas able to reach a verdict.able to reach a verdict.  If the noun shows members acting asIf the noun shows members acting as individuals, use the plural.individuals, use the plural.  TheThe SquadSquad castcast their votes for a new president.their votes for a new president.
    25. 25. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Subject/Verb AgreementSubject/Verb Agreement  Certain subjects look like they are pluralCertain subjects look like they are plural when they are really singular. The wordswhen they are really singular. The words each, either, neithereach, either, neither and any word thatand any word that ends in –one, -body, or -thing are singular.ends in –one, -body, or -thing are singular.  AnyoneAnyone AnybodyAnybody AnythingAnything  No oneNo one NobodyNobody NothingNothing  EveryoneEveryone EverybodyEverybody EverythingEverything  SomeoneSomeone SomebodySomebody SomethingSomething
    26. 26. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Subjects Joined bySubjects Joined by AndAnd  If two or more singular subjects are joinedIf two or more singular subjects are joined byby andand, they are considered plural. (1 + 1, they are considered plural. (1 + 1 = 2)= 2)  OfficerOfficer ThompsonThompson and Officerand Officer SimsSims werewere transferred to District 5.transferred to District 5.  If singular and plural subjects are joinedIf singular and plural subjects are joined byby and,and, they are plural.they are plural.  OfficerOfficer GreenGreen and threeand three teenagersteenagers werewere asked to testify in court.asked to testify in court.
    27. 27. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Subjects Separated bySubjects Separated by OrOr oror NorNor  If two subjects are separated byIf two subjects are separated by oror oror nor,nor, the verb agrees with the subjectthe verb agrees with the subject positioned nearest to it in the sentence.positioned nearest to it in the sentence.  Mrs. Gayle or herMrs. Gayle or her sonssons werewere in the house atin the house at the time of the incident.the time of the incident.  Her sons or Mrs.Her sons or Mrs. GayleGayle waswas responsible forresponsible for the fire.the fire.
    28. 28. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Pronoun Antecedent AgreementPronoun Antecedent Agreement Basic Principle:Basic Principle: A pronoun takes the place of a noun. EachA pronoun takes the place of a noun. Each pronoun has anpronoun has an antecedentantecedent – the word that– the word that the pronoun takes the place of and refersthe pronoun takes the place of and refers to. Each pronoun refers to only oneto. Each pronoun refers to only one antecedent.antecedent.
    29. 29. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Pronoun Antecedent AgreementPronoun Antecedent Agreement  The pronoun must agree with theThe pronoun must agree with the antecedent in gender and in number.antecedent in gender and in number.  IncorrectIncorrect:: EachEach officerofficer must bringmust bring theirtheir notesnotes to the meeting.to the meeting.  Correct:Correct: EachEach officerofficer must bringmust bring hishis (or(or her)her) notes to the meeting.notes to the meeting.  Better:Better: AllAll officersofficers must bringmust bring theirtheir notes to thenotes to the meeting.meeting.
    30. 30. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Pronoun Antecedent AgreementPronoun Antecedent Agreement  The same rules that apply to subject/ verbThe same rules that apply to subject/ verb agreement also apply to pronounagreement also apply to pronoun antecedent agreement.antecedent agreement.  The female child heldThe female child held herher pencil inpencil in herher closedclosed fist.fist.  Attorney Jim Spartus was asked to bringAttorney Jim Spartus was asked to bring hishis estimates on the damage toestimates on the damage to hishis client’s boatclient’s boat to court on Wednesday.to court on Wednesday.  The threeThe three suspectssuspects asked forasked for theirtheir lawyerslawyers
    31. 31. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Ambiguous PronounsAmbiguous Pronouns  When a sentence isWhen a sentence is written in such a waywritten in such a way that the reader doesthat the reader does not know who or whatnot know who or what the pronoun refers to,the pronoun refers to, the sentence has anthe sentence has an ambiguous pronounambiguous pronoun
    32. 32. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Ambiguous PronounsAmbiguous Pronouns  Each pronoun in a sentence should refer to onlyEach pronoun in a sentence should refer to only one antecedent.one antecedent.  Incorrect:Incorrect: Officer Swanson saw the man carrying aOfficer Swanson saw the man carrying a television set, andtelevision set, and hehe began to run.began to run. Who doesWho does hehe referrefer to– Officer Swanson or the man?to– Officer Swanson or the man?  Correct:Correct: Officer Swanson saw the man carrying aOfficer Swanson saw the man carrying a television set, and the man began to run.television set, and the man began to run.  Correct:Correct: Officer Swanson saw the man carrying aOfficer Swanson saw the man carrying a television set, and he, Swanson, began to run.television set, and he, Swanson, began to run.
    33. 33. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E. Foster What is Jargon?What is Jargon? And, why should we avoid it?And, why should we avoid it?
    34. 34. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Avoid WordinessAvoid Wordiness  Good police reports can avoid wordinessGood police reports can avoid wordiness by doing the following:by doing the following:  Use simple wordsUse simple words  Use active voiceUse active voice  Avoid wordy phrasesAvoid wordy phrases  Avoid redundancyAvoid redundancy
    35. 35. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E ExamplesExamples  Incorrect:Incorrect: InIn subsequentsubsequent endeavors toendeavors to ascertain herascertain her whereabouts on Julywhereabouts on July 28, I questioned the28, I questioned the suspected perpetratorsuspected perpetrator as she exited theas she exited the premises of herpremises of her employment.employment.  Correct:Correct: I laterI later questioned thequestioned the suspect as she leftsuspect as she left work to learn wherework to learn where she had been on Julyshe had been on July 28.28.
    36. 36. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Avoid Wordy PhrasesAvoid Wordy Phrases  Each and everyEach and every  Red in colorRed in color  Due to the fact thatDue to the fact that  If this should prove toIf this should prove to be the casebe the case  Paced back and forthPaced back and forth  Members of the gangMembers of the gang  EachEach  RedRed  BecauseBecause  IfIf  PacedPaced  Gang membersGang members
    37. 37. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Avoid RedundancyAvoid Redundancy  Past experiencePast experience  True factsTrue facts  Future plansFuture plans  Meet togetherMeet together  Reduce downReduce down  Final resultFinal result  Join togetherJoin together  Basic fundamentalsBasic fundamentals  ExperienceExperience  FactsFacts  PlansPlans  MeetMeet  ReduceReduce  The resultThe result  JoinJoin  Basic/ fundamentalBasic/ fundamental
    38. 38. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Report Facts, Not OpinionsReport Facts, Not Opinions  How do youHow do you know?know?  SeeSee  HearHear  TasteTaste  TouchTouch  SmellSmell
    39. 39. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Report Facts, Not OpinionsReport Facts, Not Opinions  Report facts, not your opinions.Report facts, not your opinions.  Opinion:Opinion: Peterson is a violent person.Peterson is a violent person.  Fact:Fact: Peterson has been arrested twice for domesticPeterson has been arrested twice for domestic abuse.abuse.  Be sure to cite the source of your information.Be sure to cite the source of your information.  The victim entered the garage at approximately 2311The victim entered the garage at approximately 2311 hours. (How do you know? Were you there?)hours. (How do you know? Were you there?)  The victim said she entered the garage atThe victim said she entered the garage at approximately 2311 hours.approximately 2311 hours.
    40. 40. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Use Specific WordsUse Specific Words  Accuracy involves detail, so be sure your sentences are specific enough to give the reader a clear picture.  The suspect was driving recklessly.  The suspect did not stop the vehicle before it struck the child on the sled.
    41. 41. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Attitude Toward ReportsAttitude Toward Reports  Defense Attorney:Defense Attorney:  ““If it isn’t on paper, it didn’t happen.”If it isn’t on paper, it didn’t happen.”  Defense attorneys always check to see whoDefense attorneys always check to see who was the arresting officer. Every officer earnswas the arresting officer. Every officer earns a reputation for the quality of reports that hea reputation for the quality of reports that he or she writes.or she writes.
    42. 42. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Attitudes Toward ReportsAttitudes Toward Reports  Juries:Juries:  ““If I don’t hear it in court, it didn’t happen.”If I don’t hear it in court, it didn’t happen.”  If something is not in the report, it is harder to bringIf something is not in the report, it is harder to bring up in court. If you testify about information but it’s notup in court. If you testify about information but it’s not in the report, you’ve lost credibility. There is no goodin the report, you’ve lost credibility. There is no good answer to the question, “Why isn’t it in the report?”answer to the question, “Why isn’t it in the report?”  On the witness stand, if an officer can’t remember butOn the witness stand, if an officer can’t remember but says that the information is in the report, the jurysays that the information is in the report, the jury usually believes the report.usually believes the report.
    43. 43. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Writing a ReportWriting a Report  Most reports will begin with aMost reports will begin with a face sheet.face sheet.  Face sheetsFace sheets are used toare used to  Direct information gatheringDirect information gathering  Record pertinent statisticsRecord pertinent statistics  Organize informationOrganize information  Reduce the length of the narrativeReduce the length of the narrative  Provide a quick reference for othersProvide a quick reference for others
    44. 44. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Writing a ReportWriting a Report  Once your notes are inOnce your notes are in order, write theorder, write the narrative. Eachnarrative. Each narrative will havenarrative will have  An opening orAn opening or SourceSource of Activityof Activity  Chronological facts ofChronological facts of the investigation orthe investigation or ObservationsObservations  A closing or dispositionA closing or disposition
    45. 45. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Writing a ReportWriting a Report  The opening will containThe opening will contain  Who the officer(s) and complainant(s) areWho the officer(s) and complainant(s) are  What the officer was doing at the time of theWhat the officer was doing at the time of the callcall  What the incident wasWhat the incident was  When (time and date) the officer received theWhen (time and date) the officer received the callcall  Where the incident occurredWhere the incident occurred
    46. 46. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Writing a ReportWriting a Report  A typical opening, with heading, may readA typical opening, with heading, may read as follows:as follows: Source of Activity:Source of Activity: On Tuesday, March 18, 200-, I was onOn Tuesday, March 18, 200-, I was on patrol alone. At approximately 1042 hours,patrol alone. At approximately 1042 hours, Dispatch called and said that a Henry BartellDispatch called and said that a Henry Bartell had reported a battery in progress outsidehad reported a battery in progress outside Katy’s Café, 123 Main Street.Katy’s Café, 123 Main Street.
    47. 47. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Writing a ReportWriting a Report  The chronological narration of the incidentThe chronological narration of the incident should outline what you did to investigateshould outline what you did to investigate the incident.the incident.  UseUse headingsheadings to keep your reportto keep your report organized. Exact headings will depend onorganized. Exact headings will depend on the type of incident that you arethe type of incident that you are investigating.investigating.
    48. 48. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Writing a ReportWriting a Report  Source of ActivitySource of Activity  ObservationsObservations  Victim’s StatementsVictim’s Statements  Witness’ StatementsWitness’ Statements  Officer’s ActionsOfficer’s Actions  Suspect’s StatementsSuspect’s Statements  Description of StolenDescription of Stolen GoodsGoods  EvidenceEvidence  DispositionDisposition  ArrestsArrests  CitationsCitations  Juvenile CustodyJuvenile Custody  StatusStatus  Headings may include:
    49. 49. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E Writing a ReportWriting a Report  Under each heading use one or moreUnder each heading use one or more paragraphs. Use a new paragraph to signalparagraphs. Use a new paragraph to signal  A shift in focusA shift in focus  New perspective/ viewpointNew perspective/ viewpoint  New topic or idea within a topicNew topic or idea within a topic  A change of timeA change of time  A change of locationA change of location  A new person or speakerA new person or speaker  Set off dialogueSet off dialogue  A new section of the reportA new section of the report  Paragraphs may include numbered orParagraphs may include numbered or bulleted lists.bulleted lists.
    50. 50. Copyright 2005-2009: Hi Tech Criminal Justice, Raymond E. Foster Principles ofPrinciples of Criminal InvestigationsCriminal Investigations andand Report WritingReport Writing Find out more aboutFind out more about forensicforensic sciencescience atat www.forensicprofiles.comwww.forensicprofiles.com

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