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Shea chapter 9

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Shea chapter 9

  1. 1. 9The Judiciary
  2. 2. Video:The Big Picture 9 http://media.pearsoncmg.com/ph/hss/SSA_SHARED_MED IA_1/polisci/presidency/Shea_Ch09_The_Judiciary_Seg1_ v2.html
  3. 3. Video:The Basics 9 http://media.pearsoncmg.com/ph/hss/SSA_SHARED_MED IA_1/polisci/presidency/Seg2_Judiciary_v2.html
  4. 4. Court Structure and Processes  Trial Courts  Appellate Courts  The U.S. Supreme Court 9.1
  5. 5. Trial Courts  Dual court system  Criminal prosecution  Civil lawsuits  Jury trial  Original jurisdiction  Settlements and plea bargains 9.1
  6. 6. TABLE 9.1A: Structure of the American court system 9.1
  7. 7. TABLE 9.1B: Paths to the U.S. Supreme Court for criminal and civil cases in state and federal court systems 9.1
  8. 8. Appellate Courts  Appellate courts  Courts of last resort  No jury trials  Majority opinion  Concurring and dissenting opinions 9.1
  9. 9. 9.1 Actor Mel Gibson
  10. 10. FIGURE 9.1: Geographic jurisdiction of federal courts 9.1
  11. 11. The U.S. Supreme Court  Writ of certiorari  Justices choose the cases  Appellate briefs and oral arguments  Conference and vote  Majority opinion  Concurring and dissenting opinions 9.1
  12. 12. TABLE 9.2: Supreme Court Justices 9.1
  13. 13. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor 9.1
  14. 14. 9.1 All of the following are part of the appellate court process except: 9.1 a. Appellate briefs b. Jury trials c. Oral arguments d. Lower court review
  15. 15. 9.1 All of the following are part of the appellate court process except: 9.1 a. Appellate briefs b. Jury trials c. Oral arguments d. Lower court review
  16. 16. The Power of American Judges  Constitutional and Statutory Interpretation  Judicial Review  Federal Judges’ Protected Tenure 9.2
  17. 17. Alexander Hamilton 9.2
  18. 18. Constitutional and Statutory Interpretation  Statutes  May need interpretation  “Cruel and unusual punishments”  What does that mean?  Political battles over judge nominations  Arise given judges’ interpretive authority 9.2
  19. 19. Judicial Review  Marbury v. Madison  Established judicial review  Judiciary Act of 1789  Designed the federal court system  Writ of mandamus  Order by the court 9.2
  20. 20. TABLE 9.3: Judicial Review 9.2
  21. 21. Chief Justice John Marshall 9.2
  22. 22. Federal Judges’ Protected Tenure  Impeachment  Generally removed only for criminal activity  Court-packing plan  FDR’s attempt to influence the judiciary 9.2
  23. 23. Video: In Context http://media.pearsoncmg.com/ph/hss/SSA_SHARED_MED IA_1/polisci/presidency/Seg3_Judiciary_v2.html 9.2
  24. 24. FIGURE 9.2: U.S. Supreme Court justices’ length of service and age 9.2
  25. 25. 9.2 What did the case Marbury v. Madison establish? 9.2 a. “Cruel and unusual punishments” b. Judicial review c. Certain sections of the Judiciary Act of 1789 d. Writs of mandamus
  26. 26. 9.2 What did the case Marbury v. Madison establish? 9.2 a. “Cruel and unusual punishments” b. Judicial review c. Certain sections of the Judiciary Act of 1789 d. Writs of mandamus
  27. 27. Judicial Selection  Judicial Selection in the Federal System  Judicial Selection in the States 9.3
  28. 28.  Confirmation process  President appoints, Senate confirms  Senatorial courtesy  Filibuster Judicial Selection in the Federal System 9.3
  29. 29.  Partisan elections  Nonpartisan elections  Gubernatorial or Legislative appointment Judicial Selection in the States 9.3
  30. 30. TABLE 9.4: Primary methods of initial judicial selection for state judges 9.3
  31. 31. 9.3 Where is the first hearing held for a nominee for a federal judgeship? 9.3 a. Senate Rules Committee b. Senate Judiciary Committee c. Senate Floor d. Conference Committee
  32. 32. 9.3 Where is the first hearing held for a nominee for a federal judgeship? 9.3 a. Senate Rules Committee b. Senate Judiciary Committee c. Senate Floor d. Conference Committee
  33. 33. Judicial Decision-Making  Decision-Making and Case Precedent  Political Science and Judicial Decision-Making 9.4
  34. 34. Decision-Making and Case Precedent  Case precedent  Original intent  What did the framers intend?  Flexible interpretation  What do the words mean in light of current values? 9.4
  35. 35. Justice Antonin Scalia 9.4
  36. 36. Justice Anthony Kennedy 9.4
  37. 37. Political Science and Judicial Decision-Making  Legal model  Justices follow theories and consider precedents  Attitudinal model  Opinions driven by attitudes and values  Strategic voting vodel  Advancing a specific goal 9.4
  38. 38. Video:Thinking Like a Political Scientist 9.4 http://media.pearsoncmg.com/ph/hss/SSA_SHARED_MED IA_1/polisci/presidency/Seg4_Judiciary_v2.html
  39. 39. Justice Elena Kagen 9.4
  40. 40. 9.4 When Supreme Court justices weigh theory and precedent, they are following this concept: 9.4 a. Attitudinal model b. Strategic voting model c. Legal model d. New institutionalism
  41. 41. 9.4 When Supreme Court justices weigh theory and precedent, they are following this concept: 9.4 a. Attitudinal model b. Strategic voting model c. Legal model d. New institutionalism
  42. 42. Explore the Simulation:You Are a Supreme Court Clerk 9.4 http://media.pearsoncmg.com/long/long_longman_media _1/2013_mpsl_sim/simulation.html?simulaURL=10
  43. 43. Explore the Judiciary:Who Are the Activist Judges? 9.4 http://media.pearsoncmg.com/long/long_shea_mpslld_4/p ex/pex8.html
  44. 44. Action in the Court Pathway  Interest Group Litigation  Elements of Strategy 9.5
  45. 45. Interest Group Litigation  Expertise  Requires attorneys who know the law  Litigation resources  Lawyers who work pro bono 9.5
  46. 46. FIGURE 9.3: Policy-shaping litigation on the University of Michigan affirmative action cases 9.5
  47. 47. Elements of Strategy  Selection of cases  Choice of jurisdiction  Framing the arguments  Public relations and the political environment 9.5
  48. 48. Activists protesting outside the Supreme Court 9.5
  49. 49. Video: In the RealWorld 9.5 http://media.pearsoncmg.com/ph/hss/SSA_SHARED_MED IA_1/polisci/presidency/Seg5_Judiciary_v2.html
  50. 50. 9.5 Which of these is an important strategic consideration for special interest groups? 9.5 a. Selection of cases b. Choice of jurisdiction c. Framing the argument d. All of the above
  51. 51. 9.5 Which of these is an important strategic consideration for special interest groups? 9.5 a. Selection of cases b. Choice of jurisdiction c. Framing the argument d. All of the above
  52. 52. Implementation and Impact of Court Decisions  Watergate  Cherokee removal  Brown v. Board of Education 9.6
  53. 53. 9.6 What do Watergate, Brown v. Board of Education and the Cherokee removal cases illustrate? 9.6 a. The power of the Supreme Court b. The policy-shaping role of the Supreme Court c. The reliance of the Supreme Court on public and executive branch cooperation to enforce its rulings d. The need for judicial activism
  54. 54. 9.6 What do Watergate, Brown v. Board of Education and the Cherokee removal cases illustrate? 9.6 a. The power of the Supreme Court b. The policy-shaping role of the Supreme Court c. The reliance of the Supreme Court on public and executive branch cooperation to enforce its rulings d. The need for judicial activism
  55. 55. Judicial Policymaking and Democracy  Life-tenure of federal judges  Majority rule  Protection of rights for individuals 9.7
  56. 56. The U.S. Supreme Court 9.7
  57. 57. 9.7 The Constitution positions federal judges to do what? 9.7 a. Protect constitutional rights b. Temper majority rule c. Review laws for constitutionality d. All of the above
  58. 58. 9.7 The Constitution positions federal judges to do what? 9.7 a. Protect constitutional rights b. Temper majority rule c. Review laws for constitutionality d. All of the above
  59. 59. Discussion Question How does the Supreme Court set policy? Should policy-making be left to Congress and the executive branch? Why or why not? 9
  60. 60. Video: SoWhat? http://media.pearsoncmg.com/ph/hss/SSA_SHARED_MED IA_1/polisci/presidency/Shea_Ch09_The_Judiciary_Seg6_ v2.html 9

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