Planning Commission
A New Context, A New Vision
ž  Away from Command-and-Control
ž  Facilitating Reform
ž  “An Essay in...
12th Plan: A Learning Plan
from a Learning Organisation
Ø  Innovation in recent years has been led
by States, CSOs and PR...
New Architecture of Plan Formulation
ž  Inclusive process of plan formulation
ž  For the first time in the history of th...
ü  Irrigation Management Transfer (IMT)
Andhra Pradesh, CSOs
ž  Massive and growing gap between
IPC and IPU
ž  Low wate...
ü  Participatory Aquifer Management
Andhra Pradesh, CSOs
ž  Irrigation consumes 80% of India’s water
ž  Nearly two-thir...
ü  Breaking Groundwater-Energy Nexus
Gujarat, 7 other States
•  24 x7 electricity
supply to rural
habitants and non
farm ...
ü  Reforms in Watershed Management
MP, Karnataka, CSOs
ž  Professionalisation
ž  Capacity Building
ž  Institution Buil...
ü  Room for the River
Flood Management in Bihar
ž  India has over 35,000 km of embankments
ž  Experience world-wide sho...
ü  Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan
Odisha, CSOs
ž  Open defecation biggest national shame
ž  Habitation Saturation Approach
ž  D...
ü  Urban Water and Waste Management
Tiruchirapally, Surat, Udaipur, CSOs
ž  Reduce distance water needs to travel
ž  Pr...
ü  Legal and Institutional Reforms in Water
Maharashtra
ž  National Water Framework Law:
commonly agreed principles of w...
ü  National Rural Livelihoods Mission
Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Andhra Pradesh, CSOs
ž  Powerful corporate institutions of the...
ü  MGNREGA 2.0
Madhya Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, CSOs
ž  Success of MGNREGA lies in its declining need
ž  Majority of wor...
ü  Reforming Fund and Information Flows
Bihar and Andhra Pradesh
At Present After the Reform
1.  Credit Push
2.  Delays i...
Key Elements of these Reforms
1.  Principle of Subsidiarity
○  focus on devolution (MDI)
○  empowerment of PRIs (RGPSA)
○ ...
5. Improved Human Resource Quality
ž  District Managers empanelled on the basis of
leadership skills, attitude and motiva...
Key Elements of these Reforms
6. Mobilising-Managing Knowledge
Resources
ž  Knowledge recognised as a critical resource
o...
Thank You!
Learning From the States to Mainstream Best Practices
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Learning From the States to Mainstream Best Practices

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  • Very well done! great work..in addition to that fodder reserve scheme is also very good. Do we have got any success in it till now ? please share if possible. .. we also have to think about the 500 million livestock residing with us in India. About 200 million don't have proper access to green fodder. around 405 million women live in rural India and almost all are serving livestock unwillingly or willingly??
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Learning From the States to Mainstream Best Practices

  1. 1. Planning Commission A New Context, A New Vision ž  Away from Command-and-Control ž  Facilitating Reform ž  “An Essay in Persuasion” ž  USD 140 billion spent on flagship programs in the 11th Plan ž  “U without Q syndrome” ž  USD 250 billion allotted for 12th Plan ž  Need to find ways of bridging the outlay-outcome gap 1
  2. 2. 12th Plan: A Learning Plan from a Learning Organisation Ø  Innovation in recent years has been led by States, CSOs and PRIs Ø  Facilitate cross-learning across States to mainstream best practices Ø  Broad rubric Ø Partnerships Ø Extending Reform to the Excluded Ø Public Sector Reform Ø Devolution Ø Flexibility Ø Independent Evaluation (IEO) 2
  3. 3. New Architecture of Plan Formulation ž  Inclusive process of plan formulation ž  For the first time in the history of the Planning Commission, all Working Groups in my sectors chaired and populated by practitioners and professionals from PRIs, academia, industry or civil society ž  Co-chaired by Department Secretaries ž  Consensus arrived at reflects learning from best practice across States 3
  4. 4. ü  Irrigation Management Transfer (IMT) Andhra Pradesh, CSOs ž  Massive and growing gap between IPC and IPU ž  Low water use efficiency ž  Poor O&M of irrigation systems ž  IMT in AP has wiped out losses, improved WUE ž  NIMF set up to incentivise reform ž  Taking it beyond the engineers ž  Within PRI framework 4
  5. 5. ü  Participatory Aquifer Management Andhra Pradesh, CSOs ž  Irrigation consumes 80% of India’s water ž  Nearly two-thirds of that is groundwater ž  Which also accounts for 80% domestic water ž  Major crisis of falling water tables and quality ž  National Aquifer Management Programme initiated in the 12th Plan ž  Based on learnings from FAO-supported, civil society led program in AP ž  A million farmers taking more rational, informed decisions on cropping patterns and groundwater use 5
  6. 6. ü  Breaking Groundwater-Energy Nexus Gujarat, 7 other States •  24 x7 electricity supply to rural habitants and non farm users •  Requisite power provided to schools, hospitals, non farm economy. •  3 phase high quality, predictable, though rationed, power to agriculture Separation of Power Feeders 6
  7. 7. ü  Reforms in Watershed Management MP, Karnataka, CSOs ž  Professionalisation ž  Capacity Building ž  Institution Building ž  Role of Civil Society-PRI partnerships ž  Facilitating Work on Forest Land ž  Smoother Fund Flows ž  Focus on Groundwater 7
  8. 8. ü  Room for the River Flood Management in Bihar ž  India has over 35,000 km of embankments ž  Experience world-wide shows need to move away from narrow engineering solutions ž  Bihar will place greater emphasis on rehabilitation of traditional drainages ž  This involves complex social engineering ž  CSOs will work in partnership with the State government ž  The 12th Plan endorses this paradigm shift away from building more and more embankments towards a “room for the river” approach based on partnerships 8
  9. 9. ü  Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan Odisha, CSOs ž  Open defecation biggest national shame ž  Habitation Saturation Approach ž  Demand-driven ž  Led by women ž  Combine Drinking Water and Sanitation ž  Solid and Liquid Waste Management ž  Dramatically higher allocation in 12th Plan 9
  10. 10. ü  Urban Water and Waste Management Tiruchirapally, Surat, Udaipur, CSOs ž  Reduce distance water needs to travel ž  Protect and regenerate local water bodies ž  User charges to increasingly cover O&M costs ž  Provide 'lifeline' water free of charge ž  Higher tariffs for increasing levels of use ž  All water schemes to have sewage component ž  Recycle and reuse waste water ž  Biological methods of wastewater treatment ž  Reduce water footprint of Indian industry 10
  11. 11. ü  Legal and Institutional Reforms in Water Maharashtra ž  National Water Framework Law: commonly agreed principles of water management without altering constitutional position on water ž  Water Regulators based on experience of MWRRA ž  New Groundwater Bill based on Public Trust Doctrine enunciated by the Supreme Court to remove infirmities created by British Common Law 11
  12. 12. ü  National Rural Livelihoods Mission Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Andhra Pradesh, CSOs ž  Powerful corporate institutions of the poor led by women ž  Virtuous cycle of increasing savings, investment and incomes ž  Improved viability of public sector banks ž  Large-scale marketing of produce and purchase of essentials ž  Accountability and transparency in governance 12
  13. 13. ü  MGNREGA 2.0 Madhya Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, CSOs ž  Success of MGNREGA lies in its declining need ž  Majority of workers small and marginal farmers ž  Water security and productivity of farms allows return to farming and allied livelihoods ž  MGNREGA 2.0 focus on durable asset creation ž  Better systems of recording demand ž  IT to improve efficiency and transparency ž  Strengthen mechanisms of social audit ž  Human resources/civil society support for PRIs ž  Strengthen democracy in Maoist areas 13
  14. 14. ü  Reforming Fund and Information Flows Bihar and Andhra Pradesh At Present After the Reform 1.  Credit Push 2.  Delays in fund flows 3.  Corruption 4.  Money not available when needed 5.  Opaque file-based system 6.  Large float, wasteful 1.  Debit pull 2.  Real time transfers 3.  Criterion-based releases 4.  Seasonality of work respected 5.  Transparent, trackable internet-based system 6.  Better fiscal management 14
  15. 15. Key Elements of these Reforms 1.  Principle of Subsidiarity ○  focus on devolution (MDI) ○  empowerment of PRIs (RGPSA) ○  location-specific flexibility (flexi-fund) 2.  Strengthening Governance ○  deepening accountability ○  peoples’ empowerment ○  citizens’ participation, especially women 3.  Doing away with BPL ○  program specific indicators for program specific entitlements 4.  Converging Departmental Silos ○  overcoming hydro-schizophrenia (drinking water-irrigation) 15
  16. 16. 5. Improved Human Resource Quality ž  District Managers empanelled on the basis of leadership skills, attitude and motivation ž  Local Youth as Community Professionals ž  Incentives for professionals in backward districts ž  Young Professionals for each Flagship Program ž  New polycentric curricula to match field requirements ž  Partnership among Practitioners (Government and CSOs) and Educational Institutions Key Elements of these Reforms I 16
  17. 17. Key Elements of these Reforms 6. Mobilising-Managing Knowledge Resources ž  Knowledge recognised as a critical resource on par with and distinct from financial and human resources ž  Value all 3 sources of knowledge: professional, tacit and people’s knowledge ž  Knowledge Partnerships for each flagship program ž  Internal Decision Support Systems 17
  18. 18. Thank You!

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