Place qualities - section 3 intro to urban design and placemaking

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This PPT discusses the qualities of the places we like. Most of the cherished and highly valued places in Australia, as well as other parts of the world, share key characteristics or 'Place Qualities'. More information available at http://www.placefocus.com/Place-Qualities/place-qualities.html
You can buy a copy of our manual or enrol in an on-line course at http://placefocus.com/Shop/placefocus-shop.html

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  • Has anyone visited the Reservoir Gardens in Paddington? The conversion of an old filled in reservoir into an urban park – reminiscent of Greece?
    Good urban design or good park design?
  • Based on the discussions during the last six months I have modified the qualities.
    The first 12 are drivers of good urban design/placemaking. The “optimisers” (not sure if this is the best word yet?) are variable based on personal preference. For example you and a teenager might have a different tolerance for safety (‘grittiness’)?
    This is still a work in progress so tell me what you think?
  • The first quality and possibly the hardest to reproduce?
    A unique Australian Street - the front walk on Rottnest Island. Largely unchanged over the last 150 years of continuous use. Building from local material make a significant contribution to character.
    Can you spot the quokka?
  • A lovely dichotomy...
  • There are guidelines which inform the design of our places and buildings in relation to climate and context.
  • Diversity is a key driver for successful places – part of the reason we enjoy being in the inner city.
    This resident of affordable housing at the end of Hartop Lane in KGUV maintains the street plants. She is coordinating the construction of a community vege garden in the adjacent park.
    Because this Brisbane Housing Company site is on the main street it delivers retail and commercial at the front... with an awning!
  • If you haven’t read this book for a while it is well worth picking up again – an easy read.
    Jane is an urban legend (in more ways than one).
    Check out her thoughts on the generators of diversity.
    Most people like Portland – which has a tight 80m by 80m grid. Brisbane and Sydney’s is 200 by 100m. Melbourne is whopping 200 by 200 with the ‘little’ streets making it 200 by 100m and than the lanes and places in between. This block division is a big part of Melbourne’s urban experience
    Placing a known city grid over a site is a good tool for giving people an idea of the scale.
  • This drawing (produced in a design workshop) should deliver good permeability and connectivity. The density is high around the new train station, with a good street network and mix of uses.
    Walkability – safe and comfortable routes, not too far too walk and something to do when you get there!
  • This development, in the northern suburbs of Brisbane, was highlighted to me by a participant in the first course.
    Let’s say my mate stinky (and yes I do have a mate called stinky) lives one house away. Mad Mr Steptoe won’t let us cut through his property, then this is how far we would have to walk or ride our bikes... PTO
  • A long way!
    This is partly because the old boundary between Brisbane City and Pine Rivers Shire runs down the centre of the image.
    Lack of cross boundary planning is compounded by cul-de-sac and worm street patterns. These tend to provide quiet streets for some, at the expense of others. Not so good for public transport or cyclists.
    My kids and their friends play in our street which is not a cul-de-sac (we actually have buses in it!).
  • This development, in the northern suburbs of Brisbane, was highlighted to me by a participant in the first course.
    Let’s say my mate stinky (and yes I do have a mate called stinky) lives one house away. Mad Mr Steptoe won’t let us cut through his property, then this is how far we would have to walk or ride our bikes... PTO
  • During my time at HASSELL we were asked to develop an alternative layout plan to the one approved on the Gold Coast (guess which one).
    Our plan created a park entry overlooked by houses. It also distributed the golf course view down the street. This has been proven to add more value to the development. We also created more street and Park frontage for the medium density sites.
    Unfortunately, they stuck with the existing.
  • Good urban design introduces, maintains and intensifies human activity within the public realm.
    An example of an active building:
    retail use
    transparent facade
    interaction with the street
    a little whimsical?
  • This quality replaces robustness in the manual because it refers to fit – including the concept of ‘loose fit’
    Where new developments aspire to street level retail uses they provide higher floor to ceiling heights for ground floor apartments in the short term.
  • This is a seminal urban design guide – because of the diversity of the authors. A great ‘how to’ on your shelf.
    A resident personalising the Strand in Townsville - BYO as well! Places need to be available for people who don’t want to buy a coffee or a meal.
  • The new regional centre at Rouse Hill, Sydney was facilitated by Landcom and built by GPT. It incorporates this Main St, a town square, medium density housing and commercial development. Leading edge for Australian shopping centres!
    The street features wide footpaths (they need to be up to 7m wide for main streets), narrow carriage way, low kerbs, parallel parking, pedestrian crossing... All designed to keep traffic speed low and favour the pedestrian.
    Unfortunately, I was asked to stop taking photographs. While the spaces sound (Main Street) and feel like public spaces - they are privatised. I have sent them an email to ask why?
    The centre is built over a huge structured carpark which may restrict redevelopment in the future?
  • Melbourne – a great example of the cities public realm providing the order (and a little of the interest) and the private ventures providing the interest.
  • Signage is placed last on the list for a reason.
    I don’t know about you but I don’t feel comfortable in a new place unless I have a rough idea of orientation.
    Not necessarily a key quality for visitors though? Participants have talked about having the time to get lost in cities like Venice – and then marvel at finding Piazza San Marco around the last corner!
    This is the Rouse Hill Town Square – in which you can’t take any photos.
  • Remember Lynch’s seminal book on legibility from our university studies?
    Developed through his mind map research – which you will do later.
    Castle Hill provides a strong landmark in Townsville. If you look closely you can see the saint graffiti on the side.
    Some street trees along this footpath would help, and maybe some public art on the wall? The bollards might be overkill?
  • Signage is placed last on the list for a reason.
    I don’t know about you but I don’t feel comfortable in a new place unless I have a rough idea of orientation.
    Not necessarily a key quality for visitors though? Participants have talked about having the time to get lost in cities like Venice – and then marvel at finding Piazza San Marco around the last corner!
    This is the Rouse Hill Town Square – in which you can’t take any photos.
  • The structure of a place can play a large role in its success.
    Inner city New Farm in Brisbane benefits from central centres, alternative routes of movement, density, and a well located park.
  • Really good urban places benefit from features like the Southbank pool, Sydney Opera House, Guggenheim Museum, Eifel Tower or London Eye.
    While these features do not necessarily represent ‘good’ urban design they make a significant contribution to attracting people.
    The quality of the place might bring them back?
  • We talked about sense of place in the introduction.
    No doubt Birdsville delivers good built form outcomes. However, people probably travel long distances for the event and the associated festival (and the thrill of getting there!).
  • The new Council building in Melbourne not only has high environmental credentials (e.g. the facade responds to the sun) it also reinforces a small, but quality, urban place.
    Apparently the additional costs in the ‘healthy’ building were justified by the reduction costs due to sick leave.
  • Based on the discussions during the last six months I have modified the qualities.
    The first 12 are drivers of good urban design/placemaking. The “optimisers” (not sure if this is the best word yet?) are variable based on personal preference. For example you and a teenager might have a different tolerance for safety (‘grittiness’)?
    This is still a work in progress so tell me what you think?
  • I facilitated the stakeholder workshop for this street improvement on the Capricorn Coast. We ended up with the majority of the town there with plenty of great ideas and comments!
    They would remind me about their issue/idea every time I went back!
    We ere able to underground the powerlines, widen footpaths and provide pedestrian amenities. Unfortunately, they really wanted palms (which don’t provide a lot of shade).
  • The new residential development at Mawson Lakes is impressive given it’s distance from the city.
    These footpaths are well overlooked by the buildings.
    Some people like gritty and grungy places which some of us may describe as being unsafe?
  • Creativity in the design of the place and in it’s delivery.
    The Creative Industries Precinct is Australia's first site dedicated to creative experimentation and commercial development in the creative industries. It provides a unique opportunity for designers, artists, researchers, educators and entrepreneurs to easily connect and collaborate with others to create new work, develop new ideas and grow the creative industries sector in Queensland.
    Working closely with partners from government and industry, QUT is a national leader in the development of creative industries in Queensland and Australia and is fast becoming an internationally-networked hub of creative enterprise.
    The $60 million Creative Industries Precinct boasts some of the most advanced digital facilities to support the creative work undertaken and some of the most exciting partners in identifying the next generation of ideas.
  • Most of my sensory organs are overwhelmed at city markets!
    Private open space?
  • Based on the discussions during the last six months I have modified the qualities.
    The first 12 are drivers of good urban design/placemaking. The “optimisers” (not sure if this is the best word yet?) are variable based on personal preference. For example you and a teenager might have a different tolerance for safety (‘grittiness’)?
    This is still a work in progress so tell me what you think?
  • We acknowledge the need to engage with stakeholders- although we could be more effective?
    Participatory design (design workshop, EbD, etc) is one example.
  • Another movie you will eventually be able to see on www.placefocus.com
  • Another movie you will eventually be able to see on www.placefocus.com
  • Place qualities - section 3 intro to urban design and placemaking

    1. 1. PROGRAM – SESSION 3 Paddington Reservoir Gardens – 1 Urban Design + Placemaking 101 2 Civic Principles 3 Place Qualities 8 Outcomes 4 Place Typology 5 Place process 6 Place roles 7 Toolkit - placemaking ideas 9/10 Links+ conclusions Aussie tour of our bonza places
    2. 2. Anster St – Adelaide, SA, AUS 3. QUALITIES OF GOOD PLACES 1. Character 2. Diversity 3. Accessibility 4. Fit + function 5. Animators 6. Continuity + enclosure 7. Consistency + variety 8. Legibility 9. Structure 10. Features 11. Social Fabric 12. Sustainability PlaceDrivers 13. Quality of the public realm 14. Safety 15. Creativity 16. Sensory pleasure PlacePreference NZ Urban Design Protocol VIC Urban Design Charter Councillor’s Guide to Urban Design (Urban Initiatives, 2003).
    3. 3. 3.1 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES ▸ Character: sense of place and history ▸ All sites have intrinsic environmental qualities, community use and site characteristics. ▸ We create authenticity by enriching these unique qualities. ▸ This is a key ingredient for successful places. ▸ “Do designers destroy the story” D Engwicht The Front Walk – Rottnest Island, WA
    4. 4. 3.1 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES ▸ But cities change... and so do people ▸ We have also inherited aspirations for a better future, and a tradition of cultural vitality ▸ Good urban design: ▸ is attentive to the past ▸ adopts a critical stance toward the status quo ▸ explores possible destinies ▸ and imagines and fulfils visions Shields St, Cairns, QLD, AUS
    5. 5. 3.1 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES ▸ An example of character guidance ▸ Recognise sub-regions ▸ Respect topography ▸ Diversify the built environment ▸ Consider local character and design ▸ Integrate with nature ▸ Acknowledge informality ▸ Use vegetation ▸ Ensure open space diversity ▸ Incorporate access to open space ▸ Design for water ▸ Develop outdoor centres ▸ Develop outdoor meeting places
    6. 6. 3.2 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES ▸ Diversity: ease of choice and adaptability ▸ Everyone benefits from centres which feature a range of uses for a diverse community. ▸ It is a key criteria for a walkable urban environment - triple bottom line benefits. ▸ Drivers of diversity ▸ public buildings particularly hospitals and universities ▸ density ▸ small street blocks ▸ Small allotments ▸ day and night time activity ▸ old buildings ▸ affordable housing Affordable Housing, Hartopp Lane, KGUV – Brisbane
    7. 7. 3.2 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES
    8. 8. 3.3 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES ▸ Accessibility: connectivity and permeability ▸ Places need to be easy to get to and be integrated with their surroundings... ▸ by foot, bicycle, wheelchair, scooter, public transport and the car - and in that order ▸ density being highest where access to public transport is best ▸ a choice of connected, safe, high quality routes ▸ Flexible and responsive to demands of constant change ▸ D Engwicht Secret 4 – focus on exchanges not mobility ▸ planned v spontaneous Ormeau Town Centre Concept Plan (Deicke Richards) ▸ Walk Score
    9. 9. Me Stinky
    10. 10. Me Stinky
    11. 11. East Ridge, Robina, Gold Coast3.3 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES
    12. 12. 3.5 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES ▸ Animators: active, safe, well- used public spaces ▸ Active building edges ▸ Activities in and overlooking public spaces ▸ Comfortable and interesting places ▸ Activation also extends to people on the move ▸ Animation through management and use of places ▸ Anchoring presence ▸ Lingering nodes – numbers vs length of stay William St - Northbridge, Perth, WA, AUS
    13. 13. 3.4 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES ▸ Fit & function: support the intended use of spaces while also allowing for their adaptability ▸ ‘Fit’ the extent to which something serves its purpose, works for people and makes them comfortable. ▸ An urban space can help us to do what we want safely and efficiently. ▸ However, the relationship between people and their environments is never exact, and a ‘loose fit’ is often most desirable. ▸ Most urban spaces need to accommodate varied events rather than one specialised activity. ▸ Good public places tolerate and promote this variety, responding to a range of viewpoints and contexts... ▸ Create the potential ▸ “infinite possibilities not future destination” D Engwicht Chinatown Mall – Adelaide, SA, AUS
    14. 14. 3.4 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES The Strand - Townsville, QLD, AUS
    15. 15. Main Street, Rouse Hill Town Centre, Sydney, NSW, AUS 3.6 PLACE DRIVER ▸ Continuity and enclosure ▸ Cities benefit from a consistency in urban form which encloses the street…and clarity about their use. ▸ streets and open spaces overlooked by buildings ▸ relationship between public and private space ▸ avoiding gaps ▸ enclosing with buildings and trees ▸ no leftover spaces unused and uncared for
    16. 16. 3.7 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES ▸ Consistency & variety: balance order and diversity in the interests of appreciating both ▸ Variety for intellectual and aesthetic stimulation while avoiding confusion ▸ Cities need a balance of: ▸ individuality and community, ▸ logic and feeling, ▸ order and random incident. ▸ A city’s public realm provides coherence and order while ▸ private ventures introduce variety and interest ▸ One condition benefits from the other ▸ “Great places celebrate inherent contradictions” D Engwicht Melbourne, Vic, AUS
    17. 17. 3.8 PLACE DRIVER ▸ Legibility: ease of understanding ▸ A strong human requirement and helps us to understand and appreciate our cities and towns ▸ landmarks and focal points ▸ views ▸ clear and easily navigable routes gateways to particular areas ▸ lighting ▸ works of art and craft and ▸ signage and waymarkers ▸ Need to balance with the element of surprise Moorabool St, Geelong, VIC, AUS
    18. 18. 3.8 PLACE DRIVER Given Tce, Paddington, Bne, QLD, AUS
    19. 19. 3.8 PLACE DRIVER Moorabool St, Geelong, VIC, AUS
    20. 20. New Farm, Brisbane, QLD, AUS 3.9 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES ▸ Structure: organise places so their parts relate well to each other ▸ ‘Structure’ refers to the way an urban area is physically put together its: ▸ layout, ▸ shapes of land parcels ▸ routes of movement ▸ street patterns and ▸ networks of public spaces. ▸ A city is more than the sum of these parts; connections between the parts make a coherent, functioning whole. ▸ A good structure allows for change while the structure itself remains stable.
    21. 21. 3.10 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES ▸ Features: a reason to go there ▸ Hard infrastructure which attracts people to places ▸ Or environment ▸ Or culture ▸ Engwicht Secret 11 - encourage play ▸ “Embrace the abstract” ▸ 8-80 The Esplanade, Cairns, QLD, AUS
    22. 22. 3.11 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES ▸ Social fabric: events, activities and cultural infrastructure ▸ The quality of the public realm is a means to an end not the end itself ▸ The places we like are not only created, designed and delivered - they also need to be maintained St Patricks Day – George St, Brisbane, QLD, AUS
    23. 23. 3.12 DRIVERS OF GOOD PLACES ▸ Sustainability: environmentally, socially and economically ▸ We exist because of our environment – we are a part of it ▸ Places need to strike a balance between the natural and manmade environment ▸ the climate ▸ landform ▸ landscape and ecology ▸ We need to find opportunities to celebrate the environment in cities – easiest at our river and harbour edges and creek crossings? Gosford, NSW, AUS
    24. 24. Given Tce, Paddington, Bne, QLD, AUS 3. QUALITIES OF GOOD PLACES 1. Character 2. Diversity 3. Accessibility 4. Fit + function 5. Animators 6. Continuity + enclosure 7. Consistency + variety 8. Legibility 9. Structure 10. Features 11. Social Fabric 12. Sustainability PlaceDrivers 13. Quality of the public realm 14. Safety 15. Creativity 16. Sensory pleasure PlacePreferenceNZ Urban Design Protocol VIC Urban Design Charter Councillor’s Guide to Urban Design (Urban Initiatives, 2003).
    25. 25. 3.13 PLACE PREFERENCE ▸ Quality of the public realm: sense of wellbeing & amenity ▸ For places to be well-used and well-loved, they generally are safe, comfortable, varied and attractive , distinctive, and offer variety, choice and fun ▸ We must design places which meet the existing and expected needs and aspirations of all users ▸ Engwicht Secret 1 – Make people feel at home ▸ “You can create a house with money but not a home” Hill St, Emu Park – QLD http://www.peet.com.au/Uploads/Images/emu-park-2-003218.jpg
    26. 26. Mawson Lakes – Adelaide, SA, AUS 3.14 PLACE PREFERENCE ▸ Safety: design spaces that help us understand risk to support safe behaviour ▸ Risk is not the problem, need to be able to read the risk ▸ Create places where people can use their own natural aptitudes to keep themselves and others safe from harm. ▸ This requires support for human abilities of perception e.g. street lamps that emit white light help ▸ Safety is supported when people can see potential threats, judge risks, escape if a threat is perceived, seek assistance and give aid if needed.
    27. 27. 3.15 PLACE PREFERENCE ▸ Creativity: richness and diversity ▸ Placemaking requires creative and innovative approaches ▸ It turns a functional place into a memorable place ▸ Creativity facilitates new ways of thinking and a willingness to think through problems afresh to: ▸ experiment and rewrite rules ▸ to harness new technology, and ▸ to visualise new futures. Creative Industries Precinct - Kelvin Grove Urban Village, Brisbane, QLD, AUS
    28. 28. Adelaide Central Markets – Adelaide, SA, AUS 3.16 PLACE PREFERENCE ▸ Sensory pleasure: create spaces that engage the senses and delight the mind ▸ Appearance, hearing, taste, smell and touch, and awareness of our body’s position and movement through space and across the topography ▸ Good urban design addresses visible and invisible dimensions of human experience ▸ Engwicht Secret 10 – feed the senses
    29. 29. Darling St, Balmain, Sydney, NSW, AUS 3. QUALITIES OF GOOD PLACES 1. Character 2. Diversity 3. Accessibility 4. Fit + function 5. Animators 6. Continuity + enclosure 7. Consistency + variety 8. Legibility 9. Structure 10. Features 11. Social Fabric 12. Sustainability PlaceDrivers 13. Quality of the public realm 14. Safety 15. Creativity 16. Sensory pleasure PlacePreference NZ Urban Design Protocol VIC Urban Design Charter Councillor’s Guide to Urban Design (Urban Initiatives, 2003).
    30. 30. Little Stanley St, Southbank – Brisbane QLD, AUS 3. QUALITIES – IMPLEMENTATION? ▸ Performance vs ▸ Prescription vs ▸ Expectations (Hamilton NZ)
    31. 31. Rundle St Mall – Adelaide, SA, AUS 3 QUALITIES OF GOOD PLACES ▸ Engwicht Secret 3 – break the rules ▸ Understand the rules but don’t be bound by them ▸ Seek the inherent contradictions ▸ Everything we design should have multiple or conflicting implications
    32. 32. 3. QUALITIES – MALCOLM SNOW
    33. 33. 3. QUALITIES OF GOOD PLACES
    34. 34. 3. REFLECTION ▸ Individual – group: short answer test p156 3.6 Are any qualities more important than others? ▸ Place driver 01 Character 02 Diversity 03 Accessibility 02 Fit + Function 05 Animators 06 Continuity + Enclosure 07 Consistency +Variety 08 Legibility 09 Structure 10 Features 11. Social Fabric 12. Sustainability 3.7 (different) Consider your local centre? What qualities does it have? 3.8 Are any qualities missing from this place? ▸ Aussie tour of our bonza places ▸ Postcard from the future! George St, The Rocks, Sydney, NSW, AUS ▸ Place preference 13 Quality of the Public Realm 12 Safety 15 Creativity 16 Sensory Pleasure

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