North Carolina Geology   Dr. Greg Pillar Assistant Professor of  Environmental Science and Chemistry Queens University of ...
Rock Cycle Weathering And erosion Deposition and lithification Sediments Metamorphic Rock Sedimentary Rock Igneous Rock De...
 
Most recent (lots of mammals) Four main parts of geologic time scale (based on fossils) Dinosaurs and first  flowering pla...
600 MYA Supercontinent of Rodinia
550 MYA Iapetus Ocoee  Basin **
500 MYA Parts of Asia North America Parts of Europe
500 MYA Taconic  Orogeny **
370 MYA Avalonia Parts of Asia North America and Parts of Europe Africa and South Amer. (Gondwana)
370 – 400 MYA Acadian Orogeny* **
300 - 330 MYA Alleghenian Orogeny **
280 MYA Supercontinent of Pangaea North America Appalachian Mtns. South America. Africa. Tethys  Sea Africa, Antarctica, A...
150 MYA South America Parts of Europe and Asia North America Africa India, Australia and Antarctica
 
 
**
How did the state of North Carolina develop?  What caused the formation of the geologic belts within North Carolina? What ...
 
Geologic Belts:  Areas with similar rock types and geologic history Brevard Fault (blue ridge escarpment) Inner Piedmont B...
Kings Mountain Belt:  moderately deformed and metamorphosed volcanic and sedimentary rocks about 400 – 500 myo Rocks Schis...
Charlotte Belt:  consists mostly of igneous rocks, 300-500 myo (tactonic orogeny) Rocks Granite, diorite, gabbro (mafic)
Carolina Slate Belt:  consists of heated and deformed volcanic and sedimentary rocks (gondwana terranes) Rocks granite, ar...
Triassic basins:  the basins are filled with sedimentary rocks about 190-200 mya.  Rocks conglomerate, sandstone, mudstone
Coastal Plain:  wedge of marine sedimentary rocks that thickens as you move toward the east  Orangeburg scarp (fall zone) ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Genvr102 nc 0_nc_geology_cms_greg11

1,437 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,437
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
21
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University Goals for this chapter : Investigate the processes of deformation and metamorphism, and the resulting rocks and structures Understand the plate-tectonic settings of deformation and metamorphism Observe how structures and metamorphic rocks are expressed in the landscape Headings in notes : MEDIA Name of file and information about what is on the media file (generally accessed via the media link in the lower right corner of slide, if present) INSTRUCTIONS TO STUDENTS Instructions that the instructor can give to students OBSERVATIONS What students might see during an observation exercise EXPLANATION Additional aspects that can be explained by the instructor EXERCISE Instructions to students about possible in-class exercise NOTES Miscellaneous notes Note on PowerPoint Animations The PowerPoint files are set up so that text and figures appear sequentially on slides. As a cue to the instructor, the figure number goes away when the next click will advance the presentation to the next slide. If the figure number is still showing, another click will reveal something else on that slide (or hide the figure number for slides with no animated text).
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • INSTRUCTIONS TO STUDENTS (After showing labels for four parts of timescale) Take a moment and repeat these names to yourself and to the person next to you, because we will be referring to these four chapters in Earth history all semester EXPLANATION If Earth formed on January 1: Precambrian takes up the first ten months and part of November Oldest dated rocks (about 3.9 to 4.0 b.y. old) would fall in early March Oldest fossils would show up in late March Animals having hard shells arrive about 542 Ma, about the middle of November Mesozoic Era starts in mid-December Cenozoic Era begins around December 26
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • North Carolina Gelogy Piedmont Field Course - CMS/Queens University
  • Genvr102 nc 0_nc_geology_cms_greg11

    1. 1. North Carolina Geology Dr. Greg Pillar Assistant Professor of Environmental Science and Chemistry Queens University of Charlotte
    2. 2. Rock Cycle Weathering And erosion Deposition and lithification Sediments Metamorphic Rock Sedimentary Rock Igneous Rock Deposition and lithification Sediments Weathering and erosion Melting Melting Magma Magma Cooling Cooling Heat and pressure Heat and pressure
    3. 4. Most recent (lots of mammals) Four main parts of geologic time scale (based on fossils) Dinosaurs and first flowering plants Appearance of fish, plants, insects, reptiles, etc. Before shells and hard parts If Earth history were 1 year
    4. 5. 600 MYA Supercontinent of Rodinia
    5. 6. 550 MYA Iapetus Ocoee Basin **
    6. 7. 500 MYA Parts of Asia North America Parts of Europe
    7. 8. 500 MYA Taconic Orogeny **
    8. 9. 370 MYA Avalonia Parts of Asia North America and Parts of Europe Africa and South Amer. (Gondwana)
    9. 10. 370 – 400 MYA Acadian Orogeny* **
    10. 11. 300 - 330 MYA Alleghenian Orogeny **
    11. 12. 280 MYA Supercontinent of Pangaea North America Appalachian Mtns. South America. Africa. Tethys Sea Africa, Antarctica, Australia North America
    12. 13. 150 MYA South America Parts of Europe and Asia North America Africa India, Australia and Antarctica
    13. 16. **
    14. 17. How did the state of North Carolina develop? What caused the formation of the geologic belts within North Carolina? What type of rocks would you expect to find within each belt (physiographic province)?
    15. 19. Geologic Belts: Areas with similar rock types and geologic history Brevard Fault (blue ridge escarpment) Inner Piedmont Belt: most deformed/metamorphosed portion of the Piedmont, rocks are about 500 – 700 myo (Iapetus Rocks) Rocks Gneiss and Schist with (younger) granitic intrusions
    16. 20. Kings Mountain Belt: moderately deformed and metamorphosed volcanic and sedimentary rocks about 400 – 500 myo Rocks Schistt, marble phyllite, quartzite gneiss monadnocks
    17. 21. Charlotte Belt: consists mostly of igneous rocks, 300-500 myo (tactonic orogeny) Rocks Granite, diorite, gabbro (mafic)
    18. 22. Carolina Slate Belt: consists of heated and deformed volcanic and sedimentary rocks (gondwana terranes) Rocks granite, argillite, slate, schist, phyllite, gneiss, quartzite, and gold
    19. 23. Triassic basins: the basins are filled with sedimentary rocks about 190-200 mya. Rocks conglomerate, sandstone, mudstone
    20. 24. Coastal Plain: wedge of marine sedimentary rocks that thickens as you move toward the east Orangeburg scarp (fall zone) (2 myo) Suffolk scarp (125,000 y)

    ×