Successfully reported this slideshow.

Hooked - How to build habit forming products

2

Share

Loading in …3
×
1 of 49
1 of 49

Hooked - How to build habit forming products

2

Share

Download to read offline

Description

Hooked - How to build habit forming products, a talk about the book

Transcript

  1. 1. Hooked Chris Jimenez
  2. 2. How to Build Habit-Forming Products
  3. 3. The Facts! 79 percent of smartphone owners check their device within 15 minutes of waking up every morning. A 2011 university study suggested people check their phones 34 times per day. However, industry insiders believe that number is closer to an astounding 150 daily.
  4. 4. First-To-Mind Wins Companies who form strong user habits enjoy several benefits to their bottom line. These companies attach their product to “internal triggers.” As a result, users show up without any external prompting.
  5. 5. Instead of relying on expensive marketing, Habit-forming companies link their services to the users’ daily routines and emotions
  6. 6. For Example! A habit is at work when users feel a tad bored and instantly open Twitter. They feel a pang of loneliness and before rational thought occurs, they are scrolling through their Facebook feeds. But how does this works?
  7. 7. The Hook Model
  8. 8. Trigger A trigger is the actuator of behavior — the spark plug in the engine. Triggers come in two types: external and internal.
  9. 9. External Triggers Email Website Link Or the app icon with in the phone (Badge)
  10. 10. Internal Triggers You get attached to the product by an emotion. They form habits. For example you associate Facebook with the need of social connection.
  11. 11. The 5 whys? One method is to try asking the question "why" as many times as it takes to get to an emotion. This will happen by the fifth “why.” This is a technique adapted from the Toyota Production System described by Taiichi Ohno as the “5 Whys Method.”
  12. 12. The 5 whys Let's say we're building a fancy new technology called email for the first time. The target user is a busy middle manager named Julie.
  13. 13. 1 Why? Why #1: Why would Julie want to use email? Answer: So she can send and receive messages.
  14. 14. 2 Why? Why would she want to do that?. Answer: Because she wants to share and receive information quickly.
  15. 15. 3 Why? Why does she want to do that? Answer: To know what’s going on in the lives of her co-workers, friends, and family.
  16. 16. 4 Why? Why does she need to know that? Answer: To know if someone needs her.
  17. 17. 5 Why? Why would she care about that? Answer: She fears being out of the loop.
  18. 18. Aha! Fear! Fear is a powerful internal trigger and we can design our solution to help calm Julie’s fear.
  19. 19. Lets try it with Tapp!
  20. 20. Question!!?? What are Tapp external triggers? What are Tapp internal triggers? Who are Tapp target users? How can we improve the triggers?
  21. 21. The Action
  22. 22. Action Following the trigger comes the action: the behavior done in anticipation of a reward. The simple action of clicking on the interesting picture in her newsfeed takes you to Pinterest Its very related to the art and science of good Usability design
  23. 23. Action You have to leverage two pulleys of human behavior: 1.The ease of performing an action 1.And the psychological motivation to do it.
  24. 24. Quetions!? Is Tapp easy to use? What is the psychological motivation of users to use it? What's the action that we want our users to perform after they have Tapp? Can we improve on this?
  25. 25. Once the user completes the simple action of clicking on the photo, he/she is dazzled by what she sees next.
  26. 26. The Reward!
  27. 27. Variable Reward What distinguishes the Hook Model from a plain vanilla feedback loop is the hook’s ability to create a craving. Something that is predictable don't create Desire
  28. 28. Your Fridge The unsurprising response of your fridge light turning on when you open the door doesn’t drive you to keep opening it again and again. However, add some variability to the mix — say a different treat magically appears in your fridge every time you open it — and voila, intrigue is created.
  29. 29. Dopamine Dopamine is one of the chemical signals that pass information from one neuron to the next in the tiny spaces between them When most people talk about dopamine, particularly when they talk about motivation, addiction, attention, or lust
  30. 30. The Reward Research shows that levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine surge when the brain is expecting a reward. Creating a focused state, which suppresses the areas of the brain associated with judgment and reason while activating the parts associated with wanting and desire. Slot machine, casinos, lotteries, variable rewards are everywhere
  31. 31. When the user on Pinterest Not only does she see the image she intended to find, but she is also served a multitude of other glittering objects. The images are related to what she is generally interested The exciting juxtaposition of relevant and irrelevant, tantalizing and plain, beautiful and common, sets her brain’s dopamine system aflutter with the promise of reward.
  32. 32. Before she knows it, she’s spent 45 minutes scrolling.
  33. 33. Question! 1.Is Tapp exploiting this model? 2.How can we improve on variable reward? 3.How can we reward the user in Tapp without giving them points or prices?
  34. 34. Investment
  35. 35. Investment The last phase of the Hook Model is where the user does a bit of work. The investment phase increases the odds that the user will make another pass through the hook cycle in the future. The investment occurs when the user puts something into the product of service such as time, data, effort, social capital, or money.
  36. 36. Investment The investment implies an action that improves the service for the next go-around. Inviting friends, stating preferences, building virtual assets, and learning to use new features are all investments users make to improve their experience.
  37. 37. Pinterest As the user enjoys endlessly scrolling through the Pinterest site, she builds a desire to keep the things that delight her. By collecting items, she’ll be giving the site data about her preferences. Soon she will follow, pin, re-pin, and make other investments, which serve to increase her ties to the site and prime her for future loops through the hook.
  38. 38. Question? How is Tapp users investing? What can we do to improve investing?
  39. 39. A case study
  40. 40. The Stats 4/5 young people walking on the street were playing Pokemon Go National television is reporting it in prime-time news. It took PokemonGo less than 5 hours to get to the top spot of the US App Store. Furthermore, people aren’t just downloading it and leaving
  41. 41. The Internal Trigger Relive Nostalgia: PokemonGo is a second-coming. The seed was planted more than a decade ago, in my formative years. Like many others, I spent countless hours capturing and training up Pokemon on our Gameboy’s. Cure Boredom and Feel Connected: the more obvious internal trigger is the same one that Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram all feed on. Be More Healthy: the game requires you to walk around outside to play.
  42. 42. The External Triggers FOMO: or the fear of missing out is insanely potent here. Social Recognition: we want to show our friends how awesome we are. Sweet Marketing: Great trailers and social media.
  43. 43. The Action How much effort is required to take an action.? Not much it turns out. Because there are two primary actions required to play the game and we already do these things everyday! 1.To find Pokemon all you have to do is walk around outside 2.To catch Pokemon you simply flick the Pokeball at the Pokemon to catch it.
  44. 44. The Variable Reward As we walk around, open up the app for a second, we all hope for that serendipitous Pokemon to appear on our physical radar. And all we have to do is “flick” that Pokeball and try to catch it. This whole process, the chase, the catch, the fear of missing out, these feelings are all giving us a little hit.
  45. 45. In anticipation for the hit, we get a boost of dopamine, the exact same chemical in our brain that regulates the pleasure centres
  46. 46. The Investment Time Spent—I’ve already spent a few hours, walking around, catching Pokemon, levelling up, nurturing eggs, etc. Social Network—perhaps the stronger investment is the one that I’m not making directly. The fact that my own friends are on it, that we’ll talk about it at lunch.
  47. 47. Gracias!

Editor's Notes

  • For example, suppose Barbra, a young woman in Pennsylvania, happens to see a photo in her Facebook newsfeed taken by a family member from a rural part of the state. It’s a lovely picture and since she is planning a trip there with her brother Johnny, the external trigger’s call-to-action intrigues her and she clicks. By cycling through successive hooks, users begin to form associations with internal triggers, which attach to existing behaviors and emotions. When users start to automatically cue their next behavior, the new habit becomes part of their everyday routine. Over time, Barbra associates Facebook with her need for social connection. Chapter two explores external and internal triggers, answering the question of how product designers determine which triggers are most effective.
  • It’s a lovely picture and since she is planning a trip there with her brother Johnny, the external trigger’s call-to-action intrigues her and she clicks. By cycling through successive hooks, users begin to form associations with internal triggers, which attach to existing behaviors and emotions.
  • Reward variability enviar una raspadita después de cada compra aunque gane el 1 de 10

    Crear más juegos como raspaditas que puedan ser enviados después de compras. Slot, pensar en otros

  • La gente podría agregar tarjetas especiales haciendo algún tipo de actividad.

    La gente podría subir de nivel de loyalty dependiendo de cuántas veces tapee o cuantos puntos llegue a acumular.

    Mostrar un contador de puntos a lo RPG y mostrar cuánto le falta para hacer Level Up

    Dejar a los usuarios enviar puntos limitada mente como Paypal
  • Description

    Hooked - How to build habit forming products, a talk about the book

    Transcript

    1. 1. Hooked Chris Jimenez
    2. 2. How to Build Habit-Forming Products
    3. 3. The Facts! 79 percent of smartphone owners check their device within 15 minutes of waking up every morning. A 2011 university study suggested people check their phones 34 times per day. However, industry insiders believe that number is closer to an astounding 150 daily.
    4. 4. First-To-Mind Wins Companies who form strong user habits enjoy several benefits to their bottom line. These companies attach their product to “internal triggers.” As a result, users show up without any external prompting.
    5. 5. Instead of relying on expensive marketing, Habit-forming companies link their services to the users’ daily routines and emotions
    6. 6. For Example! A habit is at work when users feel a tad bored and instantly open Twitter. They feel a pang of loneliness and before rational thought occurs, they are scrolling through their Facebook feeds. But how does this works?
    7. 7. The Hook Model
    8. 8. Trigger A trigger is the actuator of behavior — the spark plug in the engine. Triggers come in two types: external and internal.
    9. 9. External Triggers Email Website Link Or the app icon with in the phone (Badge)
    10. 10. Internal Triggers You get attached to the product by an emotion. They form habits. For example you associate Facebook with the need of social connection.
    11. 11. The 5 whys? One method is to try asking the question "why" as many times as it takes to get to an emotion. This will happen by the fifth “why.” This is a technique adapted from the Toyota Production System described by Taiichi Ohno as the “5 Whys Method.”
    12. 12. The 5 whys Let's say we're building a fancy new technology called email for the first time. The target user is a busy middle manager named Julie.
    13. 13. 1 Why? Why #1: Why would Julie want to use email? Answer: So she can send and receive messages.
    14. 14. 2 Why? Why would she want to do that?. Answer: Because she wants to share and receive information quickly.
    15. 15. 3 Why? Why does she want to do that? Answer: To know what’s going on in the lives of her co-workers, friends, and family.
    16. 16. 4 Why? Why does she need to know that? Answer: To know if someone needs her.
    17. 17. 5 Why? Why would she care about that? Answer: She fears being out of the loop.
    18. 18. Aha! Fear! Fear is a powerful internal trigger and we can design our solution to help calm Julie’s fear.
    19. 19. Lets try it with Tapp!
    20. 20. Question!!?? What are Tapp external triggers? What are Tapp internal triggers? Who are Tapp target users? How can we improve the triggers?
    21. 21. The Action
    22. 22. Action Following the trigger comes the action: the behavior done in anticipation of a reward. The simple action of clicking on the interesting picture in her newsfeed takes you to Pinterest Its very related to the art and science of good Usability design
    23. 23. Action You have to leverage two pulleys of human behavior: 1.The ease of performing an action 1.And the psychological motivation to do it.
    24. 24. Quetions!? Is Tapp easy to use? What is the psychological motivation of users to use it? What's the action that we want our users to perform after they have Tapp? Can we improve on this?
    25. 25. Once the user completes the simple action of clicking on the photo, he/she is dazzled by what she sees next.
    26. 26. The Reward!
    27. 27. Variable Reward What distinguishes the Hook Model from a plain vanilla feedback loop is the hook’s ability to create a craving. Something that is predictable don't create Desire
    28. 28. Your Fridge The unsurprising response of your fridge light turning on when you open the door doesn’t drive you to keep opening it again and again. However, add some variability to the mix — say a different treat magically appears in your fridge every time you open it — and voila, intrigue is created.
    29. 29. Dopamine Dopamine is one of the chemical signals that pass information from one neuron to the next in the tiny spaces between them When most people talk about dopamine, particularly when they talk about motivation, addiction, attention, or lust
    30. 30. The Reward Research shows that levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine surge when the brain is expecting a reward. Creating a focused state, which suppresses the areas of the brain associated with judgment and reason while activating the parts associated with wanting and desire. Slot machine, casinos, lotteries, variable rewards are everywhere
    31. 31. When the user on Pinterest Not only does she see the image she intended to find, but she is also served a multitude of other glittering objects. The images are related to what she is generally interested The exciting juxtaposition of relevant and irrelevant, tantalizing and plain, beautiful and common, sets her brain’s dopamine system aflutter with the promise of reward.
    32. 32. Before she knows it, she’s spent 45 minutes scrolling.
    33. 33. Question! 1.Is Tapp exploiting this model? 2.How can we improve on variable reward? 3.How can we reward the user in Tapp without giving them points or prices?
    34. 34. Investment
    35. 35. Investment The last phase of the Hook Model is where the user does a bit of work. The investment phase increases the odds that the user will make another pass through the hook cycle in the future. The investment occurs when the user puts something into the product of service such as time, data, effort, social capital, or money.
    36. 36. Investment The investment implies an action that improves the service for the next go-around. Inviting friends, stating preferences, building virtual assets, and learning to use new features are all investments users make to improve their experience.
    37. 37. Pinterest As the user enjoys endlessly scrolling through the Pinterest site, she builds a desire to keep the things that delight her. By collecting items, she’ll be giving the site data about her preferences. Soon she will follow, pin, re-pin, and make other investments, which serve to increase her ties to the site and prime her for future loops through the hook.
    38. 38. Question? How is Tapp users investing? What can we do to improve investing?
    39. 39. A case study
    40. 40. The Stats 4/5 young people walking on the street were playing Pokemon Go National television is reporting it in prime-time news. It took PokemonGo less than 5 hours to get to the top spot of the US App Store. Furthermore, people aren’t just downloading it and leaving
    41. 41. The Internal Trigger Relive Nostalgia: PokemonGo is a second-coming. The seed was planted more than a decade ago, in my formative years. Like many others, I spent countless hours capturing and training up Pokemon on our Gameboy’s. Cure Boredom and Feel Connected: the more obvious internal trigger is the same one that Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram all feed on. Be More Healthy: the game requires you to walk around outside to play.
    42. 42. The External Triggers FOMO: or the fear of missing out is insanely potent here. Social Recognition: we want to show our friends how awesome we are. Sweet Marketing: Great trailers and social media.
    43. 43. The Action How much effort is required to take an action.? Not much it turns out. Because there are two primary actions required to play the game and we already do these things everyday! 1.To find Pokemon all you have to do is walk around outside 2.To catch Pokemon you simply flick the Pokeball at the Pokemon to catch it.
    44. 44. The Variable Reward As we walk around, open up the app for a second, we all hope for that serendipitous Pokemon to appear on our physical radar. And all we have to do is “flick” that Pokeball and try to catch it. This whole process, the chase, the catch, the fear of missing out, these feelings are all giving us a little hit.
    45. 45. In anticipation for the hit, we get a boost of dopamine, the exact same chemical in our brain that regulates the pleasure centres
    46. 46. The Investment Time Spent—I’ve already spent a few hours, walking around, catching Pokemon, levelling up, nurturing eggs, etc. Social Network—perhaps the stronger investment is the one that I’m not making directly. The fact that my own friends are on it, that we’ll talk about it at lunch.
    47. 47. Gracias!

    Editor's Notes

  • For example, suppose Barbra, a young woman in Pennsylvania, happens to see a photo in her Facebook newsfeed taken by a family member from a rural part of the state. It’s a lovely picture and since she is planning a trip there with her brother Johnny, the external trigger’s call-to-action intrigues her and she clicks. By cycling through successive hooks, users begin to form associations with internal triggers, which attach to existing behaviors and emotions. When users start to automatically cue their next behavior, the new habit becomes part of their everyday routine. Over time, Barbra associates Facebook with her need for social connection. Chapter two explores external and internal triggers, answering the question of how product designers determine which triggers are most effective.
  • It’s a lovely picture and since she is planning a trip there with her brother Johnny, the external trigger’s call-to-action intrigues her and she clicks. By cycling through successive hooks, users begin to form associations with internal triggers, which attach to existing behaviors and emotions.
  • Reward variability enviar una raspadita después de cada compra aunque gane el 1 de 10

    Crear más juegos como raspaditas que puedan ser enviados después de compras. Slot, pensar en otros

  • La gente podría agregar tarjetas especiales haciendo algún tipo de actividad.

    La gente podría subir de nivel de loyalty dependiendo de cuántas veces tapee o cuantos puntos llegue a acumular.

    Mostrar un contador de puntos a lo RPG y mostrar cuánto le falta para hacer Level Up

    Dejar a los usuarios enviar puntos limitada mente como Paypal
  • More Related Content

    Related Books

    Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

    See all

    Related Audiobooks

    Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

    See all

    ×