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How can phasors explain reflection  and refraction? Quantum Behaviour
To review… <ul><li>Last lesson: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We found out that a phasor represents the phase of a photon at a par...
Phasors, Reflection and Refraction <ul><li>Today we will: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use the phasor model (quantum model) to ex...
Calculating Phase Position <ul><li>Phasors leave a source in phase – i.e. lined up </li></ul><ul><li>To calculate their re...
Reflection <ul><li>Using your GCSE knowledge, draw the path of a light ray/photon from the source to the eye… </li></ul>Li...
Reflection <ul><li>Using your GCSE knowledge, draw the path of a light ray/photon from the source to the eye… </li></ul>Op...
Reflection <ul><li>Now try it with phasors… </li></ul>
Resultant and Intensity <ul><li>Add all of the arrows ‘tip-to-tail’… </li></ul><ul><li>Where they ‘line up’ is where the p...
Refraction <ul><li>Let’s try the same thing with Refraction… </li></ul>
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Phasors Reflection And Refraction

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  • Light and its nature have caused a lot of ink to flow during these last decades. Its dual behavior is partly explained by (1)Double-slit experiment of Thomas Young - who represents the photon’s motion as a wave - and also by (2)the Photoelectric effect in which the photon is considered as a particle. A Revolution: SALEH THEORY solves this ambiguity and this difficulty presenting a three-dimensional trajectory for the photon's motion and a new formula to calculate its energy. More information on https://youtu.be/mLtpARXuMbM
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Phasors Reflection And Refraction

  1. 1. How can phasors explain reflection and refraction? Quantum Behaviour
  2. 2. To review… <ul><li>Last lesson: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We found out that a phasor represents the phase of a photon at a particular time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It spins at it frequency </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It travels at the speed of light </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The length of the phasor is related to the probability of phasors producing light at a point (resultant phasor) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The length of an individual phasor is usually 1 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The probability of a photon hitting a point is the square is the square of its amplitude (also the intensity) </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Phasors, Reflection and Refraction <ul><li>Today we will: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use the phasor model (quantum model) to explain light behaviour during </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reflection </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Refraction </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Understand how the ‘quantum world’ anything is possible – it is just how probable that we can calculate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To start – recall the equations to calculate the phase angle of a photon travelling along a path… </li></ul></ul>20m
  4. 4. Calculating Phase Position <ul><li>Phasors leave a source in phase – i.e. lined up </li></ul><ul><li>To calculate their relative phase at a time and path length we use: </li></ul><ul><li>Trip Time = Distance / Speed </li></ul><ul><li>Speed = f x  = c where c = speed of light = 3 x 10 8 m/s </li></ul><ul><li>Number of Rotations = Rotations per second x Number of seconds </li></ul>This is frequency
  5. 5. Reflection <ul><li>Using your GCSE knowledge, draw the path of a light ray/photon from the source to the eye… </li></ul>Light Source Opaque Block Mirror
  6. 6. Reflection <ul><li>Using your GCSE knowledge, draw the path of a light ray/photon from the source to the eye… </li></ul>Opaque Text You probably drew this, a straight line reflecting off the centre of the mirror… But in the ‘Quantum World’ anything is possible…!
  7. 7. Reflection <ul><li>Now try it with phasors… </li></ul>
  8. 8. Resultant and Intensity <ul><li>Add all of the arrows ‘tip-to-tail’… </li></ul><ul><li>Where they ‘line up’ is where the photons make the greatest contribution </li></ul><ul><li>Where they ‘curl up’ they make the least contribution </li></ul>Phasors ‘ curl up ’ Low intensity due to these paths Phasors ‘ line up ’ High intensity due to these paths
  9. 9. Refraction <ul><li>Let’s try the same thing with Refraction… </li></ul>

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