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"HSK Standard Course" Textbook1 Sample Lesson 《HSK标准教程》第一册样章

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"HSK Standard Course" Textbook1 Sample Lesson 《HSK标准教程》第一册样章

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"HSK Standard Course" Textbook1 Sample Lesson 《HSK标准教程》第一册样章

  1. 1. 314%’ *%‘ia3.§%; S/ iiidili Confucius Institute Headquarlers(Hanban) liitifiifilii STANDARD COURSE Ifi: fig: EH7?‘ Elllllx 3‘('lH—l'l7+3l5 LEAD AUTHOR: Jiang Liping AUTHORS: Wang Fang, Wang Feng, Liu Liping :5 3£'. ’1'7.''k§’s. T'f: §:£! €I3~iL /7 BEIJING LANGUAGE AND CULTURE UNIVERSITY PRESS
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  3. 3. Foreword Revised in 2009, the new HSK test has shifted the focus from testing Chinese language proficiency to the assessment of learners’ ability to use Chinese in communication. It has made a major breakthrough concerning the concept of testing and adapted to the reality of Chinese language teaching in other countries. As a result, it is widely well—received, its evaluation results being used to define one’s Chinese competence and considered an important criterion for further education or employment. To promote the image and standards of Confucius Institutes in Chinese language teaching, it is necessary to establish a system of step—by—step, easy, practical and highly efficient Chinese language teaching materials and courses. Authorized by Hanban, HSK Standard Course is developed under the joint efforts of Chinese Testing International (CTI) and Beijing Language and Culture University Press. With HSK test papers as its primary source, HSK Standard Course is characterized by a humorous style, familiar topics and a scientific course design. Matching the HSK test in all aspects, from the content, form to the levels, it is a highly applicable series of course books, which puts the idea of “combining testing and teaching, and promoting learning and teaching by testing” into practice. I’m glad to recommend HSK Standard Course to the Confucius Institutes in different countries and to other educational institutions of Chinese language as well as Chinese language learners in the belief that it will benefit them all. Thanks go to the team of authors and editors who have done the pioneering work! 74,»; Chief Executive of the Confucius Institute Headquarters Director-General of Hanban November 16th, 2013
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  7. 7. Prefoce Since 2009 when Hanban introduced the New Chinese Proficiency Test (HSK), there has been a rapid increase in the number of HSK candidates as the number of Chinese learners keeps growing. The global number of HSK candidates reached 310,000 in 2012, and the number in the first quarter of 2013 alone was around 70,000. With International Chinese Education gaining more strength as an academic discipline and more Confucius Institutes being established in the world, the number of HSK candidates will be even larger in the future. How to guide such a huge group to learn Chinese effectively and how to help them improve their Chinese language skills in all aspects and achieve good results in the HSK test are the questions we’ve always been thinking about and studying on. We believe that compiling a series of course books based on the Chinese Proficiency Test Syllabus which “combines testing and teaching” and “promotes teaching and learning by testing” could be a solution. Under the guidance of the Chinese Tests Center of Hanban and Beijing Language and Culture University Press, we developed HSK Standard Course (hereinafter referred to as Course), 21 series of new type of course books combining testing and teaching, based on years’ experience of Chinese teaching and research on HSK. I . Concepts of Compilation In the 21st century, the idea of second language teaching has entered a post—methodological age, in which it is people-oriented, emphasizing group study and Cooperation, embracing the communicative, task- based and theme—based approaches and aiming at developing learners’ integrated language skills. Under the guidance of these concepts, the compilation of the Course has displayed the following features: 1. Students-Centered, and Stressing the Development of Students’ Integrated Language Skills The premise of the concept “combination of testing and teaching” is to serve students’ needs for taking the test, but it is not merely about test-taking. Our concern is how to improve students’ language skills under the premise of serving their needs for taking the test, which is also one of the distinctive features of this series. Take HSK Level I and Level 2 tests for instance. Though tests at Levels 1-2 have only listening and reading parts, not involving speaking and writing, we’ve still provided pertinent materials and exercises for Chinese pronunciation and characters in the course books at these levels. Besides, absorbing the strengths of the aural—oral and cognitive approaches, the texts are mainly made up of “situations + dialogues + pictures” which cultivate students’ listening and speaking skills, and the workbooks focus on training students’ listening, reading and writing skills so as to improve their integrated language ability. 2. Integrating the Essential Ideas of the Communicative Approach and Task-Based Language Teaching The communicative approach stresses the appropriateness in language use and the role of context, while task-based language teaching emphasizes the authenticity of language and the acquisition of language through tasks. Both approaches attach much importance to the authenticity of language, the design of situations as well as the development of language skills in communication. HSK is not an achievement test based on any textbook; it is a proficiency test assessing learners’ language abilities, designed on the basis of the Chinese
  8. 8. Proficiency Test Syllabus. Bearing this in mind, we are aware that the Course cannot be written in the same way as the existing textbooks which require students to do repeated practice and drills on language points rather than covering every aspect that may be tested. Therefore, while ensuring the words and grammar points used are within the Syllabus, we employ different situations to give students a direct sense of how language is used in real life and help them learn and acquire the language through imitation and personal experiences. 3. Reflecting the Concept of Theme-Based Teaching Theme-based teaching is a language teaching activity focusing on the content and the connotation of the text. It emphasizes the diversity and richness of content. Generally, after a theme is chosen, students will be exposed to materials related to Various aspects of the theme, in which way their internalization and understanding of the new content is accelerated; by further probing into the theme, students’ creativity may be developed. To relate to students’ reality and broaden their horizon, starting in Book 4, the Course uses themes as leads, each theme divided into smaller themes. The themes are interrelated with each other, forming an organic network of knowledge that will stay firmly in students’ memory. H . Features of the Course 1. Written Level by Level with the Syllabus as Its Basis The HSK test is made up of six levels. The authors of the Course have done a thorough study of the Syllabus and the question designing guidebook and made a statistical analysis of plenty of past tests as well. Based on the result of our study and analysis, we’ve summed up the focuses, difficulties, language points, topics, functions and situations etc. for each book, while sticking to the vocabulary required in the Syllabus, systematically defined the scope and class hours for each level. The specifics are as follows: ’VIo1iiuu-. L’ I‘o{taoi the ‘Vfloioril‘oiiI, tii; y ‘ i"1l>ii.1.~. ih1lI, I.'i Book 1 HSK (Level 1) 150 30-34 Book 2 HSK (Level 2) 300 30-36 Book 3 HSK (Level 3) 600 35-40 Book 4 (Volumes 1 & 2) HSK (Level 4) 1,200 75-80 Book 5 (Volumes 1 & 2) HSK (Level 5) 2,500 170-180 Book 6 (Volumes 1 & 2) HSK (Level 6) 5,000 and above 170-180 Total: 9 volumes Above 5,000 510-550 The design observes the idea of International Chinese Education, with attention paid to the general applicability and practical use of the course books. Educational institutions in China and outside can decide the time span for each book referring to the number of class hours suggested above. For example, it is suggested Book 1 be finished in 34 class hours, so it will take one month with eight class hours devoted to it per week or two months with four class hours per week, etc. Generally speaking, students can pass Level 1 test after finishing Book 1 and Level 2 test after finishing Book 2, so on and so forth. 2. Each Textbook Supported by 21 Workbook of Exercises Matching the HSK Test In order to familiarize learners with the question types of HSK, the workbooks at all levels provide the exact same types of exercises, arranged in the same order and structure also, with the content focused on the specific lesson. In this way, learners will get familiar with HSK by using the course books alone rather than spending extra time in trying to get used to the form of the test.
  9. 9. 3. Independent Communicative Exercises Serving the Need for Taking the HSK Oral Test The HSK oral test is independent from the written test. To develop students’ ability of oral expression, every lesson in the Course provides communicative exercises including pair work and group work to prepare learners for the oral test. During its planning and development, this series has received much support and guidance from Confucius Institute Headquarters (Hanban), Beijing Language and Culture University Press and Chinese Testing International (CTI). It is a product of the authors, the chief editor and editors from the publishing house and the test-designing team in the Chinese Test Office of Hanban and CTI working together. I hereby extend sincere gratitude to the above—mentioned organizations and participants on behalf of the authors’ team. Any opinions or suggestions from the teachers and students using the book will be heartily appreciated. With your feedback, we’ll improve the series, making it better serve the users. Jiang Liping November, 2013
  10. 10. 7-l-Siiliiiiflfl <<HSKi»i7’E%! ti¥.1>>5*i{a‘fli%@’1i%~”3fiiiXiaé’fl27<fé, i1315%2%‘W£U’a%7§77nHSK(/21) %i§C é’~JiXi%%”—’3J%‘iilfio ~. /aiifi/ “%15i§i‘%, l‘»%§’§1i§‘l’<. %2i§'Ebii%a}‘7‘§i2l~, }}%3i5‘i% fii‘: ”§Fi5'EE?3E~/ i: ‘E7-ii, é73/I‘ 572%, fa’: /i‘in: ‘?’-E1~2/ii%£’tt%‘%iii5<fl‘i‘i§, f'}i%T%10~15/raifii, 3~4iMaaa~2:ia. ~%’<%kiaé/ E5?“ 7l°§%ii§HSK (/ €56) i:2lflil1ié’~7150i€i, Zlifliiiitia/ a7¢i104‘fii£ilfli€i (1-”ti”3“l”Jil it/ ii/ E1) , iii £l5ZabiE2lXl1‘E? %l3%: . iéiiifiiao v§i§'fU$i)‘Li%i5'l’<BilEfl? J2~3%“E~Jro : . 351%. %2i§'E%i%r‘éi%‘L‘3JE1’~J)l‘il‘2Ai%t, /%§§Etié€iXi%tl’~7)¥1‘§c. E575. Eilfi. a‘iié&ii’4J ‘-é"ai%ai‘%§2l<%i1ii', armaaaaaa/ averaaraiaixaaiazixaaaai. 7‘§)%7Efi: ‘£~i/ f*‘—t“r‘>'. l iTTE¢i23‘fi’~Ji%%ai$, Ettfiafiii. Ea. éLl%2"’z%i3‘t$i-fi’~Ja, ra7’tUi’a. r.5.. . 2l<i? ?iiE*il: Li; ‘l3é7LX aaairzaaéaiaa, ii/ T<i§E%3%‘i: 'E)I‘1l‘fiPiiJEiEa“ifiX2$é>i§9l€, i%’r‘33%3)%ia. . 4<al3é7 I/ ’+>Ti%aH‘%I1i/ “'i1’~Jtié€L1¢l*. ii%5‘Ca3‘l3é7.7‘£2é‘HjTiTi7:i“i‘. %75'l. iitiii. aaaaanraraaaazyr ii, %’c%El*r§$iXiEi%aié3iZifiiiiéifiéaaiéiko 2;a%aaamaaaaaaa. aa<eaa>. aa. aa. aa. aa. aaa4 aaaasaaa-ixaaa. uaaaaaxaaaaaaa. 1.ma. aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa. aaaax. ananaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa, aaaaaaaaaaaaa, a:anaaaaa aasaaaaaaaaaaia-a, aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa, aaaaaaaaaaaaa. 2.ax. aaaxae:4iaaaa, aiaaaraiaaoaeaaaaa-a aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaia. aaaaxaaaaaaaa. aaasmm<- a>aaaaaaxaxaam. aaiaaaraaaa. aaaaaaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaa, xaaeaaaanaaaaaaa, amm<-a>aaaaaaa aaaaaaaa. 3.aa. aaaaaaa, aaaaaaaaaaaa, aaaaaaaa, aaaa. a a. aaaia. a/ iaaI1fi. aiiaiaaaazixiaaaicaiiaa. étikaallrlataiaiti/ E]. aanaaaaaaaaxaaaa. amaaaaaaaaaa, -a aaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaaaaa. a-aaaaaraaaaaaa. aaaaaan. 4.aa. aaaaaaaaaaaaaaza. aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa ma, aaiaaaaaaaimaraauaasart, jiiflléiaatiwiiitfitniuiaasfiifitn8 aaaaaeana. aaaa. aaaaa, aaaaaaasamkaauaaaaaa
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  12. 12. 12 A Guide to The Use of This Book HSK Standard Course I is suitable for learners of Chinese without systematic Chinese learning experience and those who are going to take the HSK Level 1 test. 1. The book is composed of 15 lessons. Except Lesson 1 and Lesson 2 focusing on pronunciation, each of the rest lessons centers on a topic in three situations, each with 1-2 dialogues. Each lesson teaches 10-15 new words and presents notes on 3-4 language points. The book was written strictly abiding by the 150 words required in the Syllabus (with only 10 words not included in the Syllabus, which are words at Level 2 or 3, marked with “*” in the book). We suggest each lesson take 2-3 hours. 11. Marking the beginning stage of pronunciation learning, Lesson 1 and Lesson 2 systematically introduce initials, finals, tones, syllabic structures and other basic phonetic knowledge. The aims are to help students comprehensively understand and master the basics of Chinese pronunciation and lay a sound foundation for further study. As a result, the demonstration and correction of pronunciation are the emphases and difficult parts in instruction. Pronunciation in this book is presented with illustrations and texts, striving to help students integrate pronunciation with meaning at the beginning stage of their learning and to arouse their interest in learning. In this part, besides introducing phonetic knowledge, the texts also provide short and simple expressions in greeting, saying good-bye, expressing gratitude, and making apologies, etc. We suggest the pronunciation drills be combined with communicative exercises in teaching. 111. Each of Lessons 3-15 comprises 7 parts, namely, Warm-up, Text (with new words), Notes, Exercises, Pinyin, Characters and Application. A cultural note is designed after every five lessons, which introduces pertinent cultural background information. 1. Warm-up. In this part, pictures are used to lead in the key words and phrases. According to the teaching needs, the teacher can ask students to preview this part in order to bring their learning initiative into full play. Teachers can employ various means in using the pictures and words in class, which will intuitively help students learn the new language points and increase their interest and efficiency in learning. 2. Text. Every text comprises three situations, each with 1-2 dialogues. In contrast to the repeated practice of the key sentence patterns and new words in traditional textbooks, this textbook focuses on the words in the Syllabus, selects words and expressions from the past HSK tests and presents them repeatedly in the dialogues of the texts in different situations. Such a design will familiarize students with real-life situations where the language is used, guide them to make a quick adaption to the change of situations, thus lay a sound foundation for the parts of listening and reading comprehension in the HSK Level 1 test. 3. Notes. The book deliberately puts less emphasis on grammar. The grammar points are explained with notes. Many tables are used to demonstrate them to ensure the explanations to be concise, clear and easy to understand. For each grammar item, only the usage relevant to the current lesson is covered and provided with example sentences from easy to difficult, of which the sentence in colored print is the one in the current lesson. The purposes of explaining language points with notes are twofold. On the one hand, it will alleviate the pressure of leaming on and fear of difficulty of beginners; on the other hand, it implements the principles of “replacing lecture with practice” and “doing more practice and having less lecture”.
  13. 13. 4. Exercises. The exercises are designed after the notes in each lesson, in which the language points and key words learned in the current lesson are practiced, aiming to consolidate what’s just been learned and to train students’ listening, speaking and communication skills. The types of the exercises include answering questions, describing pictures, completing sentences and group activities, etc, which conform to the question types in the elementary-level HSKK oral test and therefore prepare students for the test. The exercises are presented intuitively. The way of doing these exercises can be arranged flexibly by the teacher. Students can either do the exercises after the explanation and practice of the text, or after the teacher explains the grammar points. These exercises can also be used to evaluate students’ learning at the end of the lesson. 5. Pinyin. In the part of pronunciation in Lessons 3-5, the pronunciation of the major and difficult finals and initials are differentiated. We suggest that teachers put emphasis on training in pronunciation rather than meaning of the words. It will be enough if students can pronounce the words correctly. Lessons 6-15 mainly introduce the tone collocation of disyllabic words, trisyllabic words, and words with a neutral tone, the first of which is the focus of instruction. The tone pattern of each disyllabic word is provided with an example Word and illustration for students to imitate and memorize, which will provide reference for the tone patterns of other words in the later stage of learning. 6. Characters. This part teaches 17 strokes, 6 stroke orders, 7 structures of Chinese characters, 52 single- component characters and 18 radicals. Teaching of single-component characters is conducted throughout the teaching of characters. Through a statistical study of the 600 words of Levels 1-3, the authors have included in Book 1 the most common 52 single-component characters with the strongest character-forrning ability. Lessons 1-6 introduce the basic strokes. Starting in Lesson 7, radicals are taught, with each lesson introducing two easy, common radicals with strong character-forrning ability, for each of which, two example characters are provided. Students mainly learn to recognize and read the characters of Level 1; they are only required to write 17 basic strokes and 52 single-component characters. 7. Application. This part in Book 1 mainly includes interaction-oriented pair work and communication- oriented group work to improve students’ integrated language skills. 8. Culture. There are altogether 3 cultural notes in Book 1, which are presented in Lesson 5, Lesson 10 and Lesson 15 respectively. Targeted at the students of this level, three cultural notes about daily communication are selected, i. e., asking about one’s age in Chinese way, the characteristics of Chinese names, and common communication tools Chinese people often use. We suggest, while presenting the pictures and texts, teachers lead in some discussion and communication concerning Chinese culture. Intermediate language may be used. The above are some directions and suggestions about the use of this textbook. You may use this textbook flexibly according to the actual teaching situations. For total beginners, this is their entry-level Chinese learning material. We strive to make Chinese easier to learn, so that students could study the language happily, effortlessly and efficiently. Upon finishing this book, students can check their language abilities and proficiency using the HSK test of the corresponding level. We hope this textbook can help every student have a good start and make further progress in their Chinese learning. 13
  14. 14. E I E Contents ifidili Words/ Phrases 45:. 513‘. I-Ml]. 3‘€’5f? >%é. $5196.? /-I 1 2 Fri. 233 EL. 3? R 2 ahalln 8 Thank you “'1. {+2. / %53‘. $1.. l. §»il3]4’§. i=53 “H2.” FEE. 7% WP . “E3. The Interrogative Pronoun / “H, /A 99 3 1fJ'<|1|H'I'/ A-15$ 14 ea. am. as See What’s your name The Sentence 3. PH “"55” fi‘J£il*'T 57 Interrogative Sentences with “V25” fill. iii. 93. ‘}1i%. 1.¥5il‘714"{. i5J “iii”. WI", 9713, E], "fa, 4:12., The Interrogative Pronouns 13] ii-" . Hi]/5. and ““fll"’ 4 fill3z'? 'afil5l4Ji1i%%Ufi 22 2.24.; >ltn1/nil She is my Chinese teacher The Structural Particle 3. ¥5El‘5]I1iJi€J “"/ E” (1) The Interrogative Particle (1) X. 75. W. awe. 1.; ,il‘6J4{ia “IL” IL, $ . T , /—, ‘3f-, The Interrogative Pronoun 3 . 31 “IL” ithitJL’—/ “££: +$ ““"”Wi“? ’ . Numbers below 100 5 Her daughter IS 20 years 30 . . , . I ‘ . 3. 3’ faith old this year “ T ” Indicating a Change 4. “$3 + k” »fuT<a%{l‘; l The Interrogative Phrase LL; +k” 31141: “F }UlTl55l5‘ui’-; >l': "‘JifiJ | ‘|fl7'1“}£ Culture: Ways of Asking a Chinese Person’s Age 39
  15. 15. iii 1% Pinyin ra%#%%fi&%%&(U. Initials and Finals of Chinese Pinyin (1): b. p. m. f. d. t. n. I. g. k. h. j. q. X i. u. U. er. 0. io. uo. o. uo. e. ie. ‘Lie. cii. ucii. ei. uei (ui). oo. iao . ‘}7.1'%‘é’9)$ 175] (3)5 ) Tones (Four Tones) i5Li%-66% 37" Chinese Syllables ifi /1E_; ‘% *3‘ ‘fi €r-§i£1'y*; Tone Sandhi: 3"’ tone + 3"’ tone PW“ 71$ Characters Lfi? %%@(D: Strokes of Chinese Characters (1): ". I . J . ‘ . 2. i). iR3'; .‘l1'7li53'- : Single-Component Characters: ". -1. 5-. ”l‘. A, 7: Lfi%%%%F&%%&(D; Initials and Finals of Chinese Pinyin (2): zh. ch. sh. r. 2. c. s ou. iou (iu). on. ion. ucin. Ucin. en. in. uen (un). Un. ong. iong. uong. eng. ing. ueng. ong. iong 2. iX‘i%-é’3$_.7af= ‘: The Neutral Tone afi%nm(U= nnanhE Rules of Pinyin ( 1): Tone Marking and Abbreviation La$%%@<D= Strokes of Chinese Characters (2): “'. ‘e. I 2. i}. ii'.3'i47li$ : Single-Component Characters: I3 . W. .. ill . ll‘. 73 1. 7i%? >}%’l)T: F”! -1§: j. q. xvfwz. c. s Differentiation: pronunciation of the initials j, q, X and 2, C, s 2£%#fi: %&Luu Differentiation: pronunciation of the finals i, u, U 3. “FF” 9"? ! Tone Sandhi of“ 7l’? (bU)” 4. «lii'”3‘%E'. }rl‘l (2) : U 7?” U 7"l‘9:9'? ‘J‘= ‘i5.H§: :¥E't j. q. x 7tEJ«‘i¥i' fi5%’1LII’l Rules ofPinyin (2): U or finals led by U with j, q, x l. (3): Strokes of Chinese Characters (3): 1 v 2. ikifiiifii? : Single-Component Characters: F] . '3 . “P . / aa$%%n(U. ifiea, ine% Stroke Order (1): horizontal preceding vertical and left-falling preceding right-falling 1. 75;%ia‘= F>lfr: fifizh. ch. sh, r Differentiation: pronunciation of the initials zh, ch, sh, r 2. }5fa"i7’l*>lfi’: fiT9‘i—*E"é’9.I= §: n 7F= ')3 a5iL%"35J'13= ng Differentiation: pronunciation of the alveolar nasal n and the velar nasal ng 3. “*” 5‘) Tone Sandhi of“ —* (yT)” 4. «i§i"%%fi'. II'l (3) : y. w fifililiaé Rules ofPinyin (3): use ofy and w ra$%%@(M: Strokes of Chinese Characters (4): L. ’L. 2. i). iR3'; .‘l1'7li53'- : Single-Component Characters: «b. )L , IL. in. 3a$%%m(m; MtflT, &gflz Stroke Order (2): top preceding bottom and left preceding right 1. )L4L 6'9 21% The Retroflex Final 2. 75;i§‘a‘i%#fi‘: it i, u. U '/ ‘F9<fi‘J%5.I-1&1’ Differentiation: pronunciation of finals beginning with i, u, U 3. F5 731% 5L%7Fv7f? x‘£ ‘”L%-7‘ 7i%'}é6 lZfi'J Difference between Aspirated and Unaspirated Initials 4. «fii%%FL'. ll'l (4) : 1% %4*<i*'3‘ Rules of Pinyin (4): syllable-dividing mark La$%%@<$= Strokes of Chinese Characters (5): 7. K 2. i}. ii'.3'i47li$ : Single-Component Characters: 719. ‘it. T . it 3. ‘Z153’-9‘J$. J'lfi (3) : 5‘L5'l‘}’6 1"], 9t“l’l'E‘J)é Edit Stroke Order (3): outside preceding inside and middle preceding sides
  16. 16. ifilili Words/ Phrases Notes ‘ % iii‘. 71 1% I can speak Chinese 40 /2‘. iii. ‘ILEJIEJ. 3?. ifs. *in""z‘. . M. 3. ‘R3. ? . / §.~’z. . 13:’ 1. fié/ E;-i/ ’Ji~aI (1) The Modal Verb ‘‘{e. ’’ (1) 2. it} 23‘-fit 1% 133- 57 Sentences with an Adjectival Predicate 3. aaialfiia (1) The Interrogative Pronoun 2.” (1) 4‘ 35 II. '3 What’s the date today 48 at. arrfl. 49:. 1'3‘. H. Efifl. am. “iii. -2.-. 7%. at} 1. Eliétlfifiafaii (1): fI. El / %. iafifl Expression of a Date (1): month, date, day of the week 2. /8 ii‘) i%' 42% 57 Sentences with a Nominal Predicate 3. Saab 57 <1) . 4a+: tv.7‘r+Ié1c H’ 2. Sentences with a Serial Verb Construction (1): 4: + place + to do sth. I’d like some tea 56 ta. "5. ? §. vi. 2‘lit9§. . ‘F-‘r. ta/ E. /1‘. tr‘? -. $9‘. 4%. 3:. #313 1. iiEif; ~i)Jia7 The Modal Verb “7I§’~” 2. airal 4"{. ia1 “ 3 9"’ The Interrogative Pronoun 6:; ye” 3. iii] “/ IV’, “ :1” The Measure Words “/1"’ and . . U . . 4. at an fut Expression of the Amount of Money I7'1'UL¥7I': T:l| }1IULII’E Where does your son work 64 »J~. za. 4:. arm. 14:. tart. ta (T). 41. WFIL. 14¢. ma. [£l‘5'L. Ei. ea 1. ibial The Verb “E. ” 2. ail‘-=1 fiiai WI‘ IL” The Interrogative Pronoun . .,, ,j[; jt» 3. otifl The Preposition “ii” 4. ¥»iI‘; I317J55I (2) The Interrogative Particle “Vé. ” (2) 10 ‘a‘I2:fai‘B1=Iéi5_'€_JL|1T: I Can I sit here 7‘%%. .l: . ‘iii. iv. 741. E. Tiiifi. léifi. x‘i)L. 217?? (592) . ‘Fifi. i if. 1‘5=IFIiI 1. $57 : »%u7=»F? £i The “ZT” Sentence: indicating existence 2. i: Ei= '?] “fa” The Conjunction “vfa” 3. fiéii-iilial The Modal Verb “fifi” 4. It} “*3” 5’~J7r)’TIi= ’=7 Imperative Sentences with “i%! _” 3'ZIIi: FF EI)Ul$% Culture: Features of Chinese People’s Names 81
  17. 17. 1}? E“ Pinyin 71$ Characters n%fifl%%fi%%m(U= ~fi%%fi%%%m Tone Collocation in Disyllabic Words (1): 15' tone + Wflwwflme 1. 2. a$%%@(a: Strokes of Chinese Characters (6): L: K/ i}ciPJIi'i7li—’? '- : Single-Component Characters: $fi. & . i5L—”i’-3-’. §9r‘~J (1) : aflziiliééiilifi/ e.‘fli%#5J Structure of Chinese Characters (1): single- component and compound fl%$fi%%fi%%fi(%: LF%%fi%%%R Tone Collocation in Disyllabic Words (2): 2"“ tone + WWHWWme . i}cii"JIi47¥~—'§‘- : Single-Component Characters: Wei. -1’? .91?-ééifi (2) : £_:6‘¥= .H@51z¥. “l’Z-‘%#J Structure of Chinese Characters (2): left-right and left-middle-right . _;1_, %,_4gl, %_ €65 » in :41» Chinese Radicals: “ 2' ” and“ ‘i ” a%$fi%%fi%$m(w: £fi%éfi%%%m Tone Collocation in Disyllabic Words (3): 3”‘ tone + 15'/2"“/3“! /4"‘ tone . i}cii"JIi47li'—3”- : Single-Component Characters: 91 4‘ . il53‘-é5#~J (3) : ,l: 'Fé§7l’I~J’~= iJ: “l"F£$*9 Structure of Chinese Characters (3): top—bottom and top-middle-bottom . i1%’-451%‘ “f ” iv “V” Chinese Radicals: cc; ssanduvss n%fifi%%fi%%m(M= Wfi%%fi%%%m Tone Collocation in Disyllabic Words (4): 4"‘ tone + Wflwwflme . i}i? JIfl1’!7l15i"- : Single-Component Characters: ii%. l . i1%‘~2?g#‘~J (4) : 31"-’fl. E%#J Structure of Chinese Characters (4): half- enclosure «ck» 7?“ an” Chinese Radicals: “£3 and “H” 1. ié /5 *3‘ *1? Pronunciation of Neutral-Tone Syllables 2. & %i6‘J 6‘) 1313 52*: Pronunciation of Reduplicated Syllables 3. "vl51éé, ',dfi3 ; “-411, -%, Pronunciation of Words with the Suffix “-411”, “—%” or “— “ ” . i}ciFJISl? .’I7¥~—? ’- : Single-Component Characters: it ‘F. ii: Eli . m$%fi(D:9ea%% Structure of Chinese Characters (5): enclosure 'i1%. _%%_ “[3,, 7?" “F7.” Chinese Radicals: “E1” and “ 2‘ ”
  18. 18. ifi 5E Words/ Phrases Notes £1.43. vi. 9;‘. “Ft. 1.Ha‘1‘€1é‘J: f«it Vifi. 514%. El. Expression of Time 11 imE, R"§‘ . 82 start. W. 4:. it 2. Ha‘I‘efli634$§: :lJii% What S the “me now :1bT§T Time Word Used as an Adverbial 3. Zia “$171” The Noun “ii” )"; ’”L. . «'§; ’A4¥. ii l. £»il5l4’€735J “«’§; ’A? l5i” (ii ---- -- T ) 133,-, The Interrogative Pronoun ‘F115 (T. 1351) . “/ E.~Z.71¥” IMU1. 715. *5I'47l‘. 2.ii%1‘? i1%57. . _ 1 2 What will the Weathgr 90 i. ‘E. 719%. 71¢ Sentences with a Sub_]ect—Pred1cate _ Phrase as the Predicate be like tomorrow 3. ,3 E13,”? ! « iv The Adverb “ii” 4. fififimiiligl “é‘” (2) The Modal Verb “4*; ” (2) "1“%. *’dL. 53553 (555) . 1."5Li57 “"i'{” . l'_"f' . 5% ”)‘f . ‘EAR, The Interjection “"1?” éxk. *3!-; . «frvaié. 2. “ii ---- --"/ E” f«n‘= %1J44F: E.iiifli4‘r [in El ¥ W1": WE “Z5-. ---- ~-"/ E” Used to Indicate an 1 3 He is learning to cook 98 J11 Action in Progress Chinese food 3~ '3‘53"'7E'1é‘75U‘5 Expression of Telephone Numbers 4. iii-iilifi-fl “via” The Modal Particle “DEC” ? i‘~‘—§. '-.2’-“. '.)L. . $¥. l. “T” 7%‘ W. t 512. Hz, ff’, $ , “ T ” Indicating Occurrence or E1 715. 5J'$‘l’ . )3 . Completion ilt1_1.§_': T7Fb"7t‘Zll| §’L wt. 2.1%. we. 9 2.2.42 “)3” 1 4 She has bought quite 104 (M) . as The Noun ‘vs ” a few clothes 3* 3- 1% 50171157 “"11” The Modal Particle “"l"I” 4. 53'] ii] “£13” The Adverb “x313” i}ii“~. 5?. kit‘. 1.“7": """9‘3” r57:§§1}’5l1H‘l'E7l. =%, .¥. . ‘L75./3 . fl 43$ . 7}‘ 3). **“>*é. “E, The Structure “ 2% ~~~~ -~ €16 ”: E , , ‘ ‘E71114 used to emphasize time, place or 15 [I2 manner I came here by air . ElJ$FJé4Jfsii (2) . 5%. Fl. Eu *3‘ . iii} Expression of a Date (2): year, month, date, day of the week 3'Z4l£: FF El )Ké’é'$'4EFfi [': ]’~]i§4%‘IE Culture: Common Communication Tools of Chinese People 119 ii| iE. 'E'§E Vocabulary 120 Characters 128 4fi%. ".§'§E Radicals 129 iliiuflatiifiifi? -?i§Jr§—‘]i§Jr¥§i‘%§% Table of Combinations of Initials and Finals in Common Speech
  19. 19. #3? TE‘: Pinyin 31$ Characters iéfé VJ’/ J fifi Function of Neutral-Tone Syllables 1. i}. ii'.3'£47ii$ -. Single-Component Characters: 1. 1% . -}X$45?: %’ “ F” in “4 ” Chinese Radicals: “ F ” and “4 ” i%i? i5Ji%fi‘J; $iEJ4§E€ (1) : *1‘ ‘e’%iifl"= L’< Tone Collocation in Trisyllabic Words (1): words starting with a first-tone syllable . ikiR3'i47li$ : Single-Component Characters: ii. . iX$%%_ 1%, , 7?‘: hi, ” Chinese Radicals: “ii ” and “ 4’ ” 2%raawaaam<m. :fi%ha% Tone Collocation in Trisyllabic Words (2): words starting with a second-tone syllable . i)iF.4i47l1$ : Single-Component Characters: 9.3.3 I iX$%%_ “B” 7?‘: “H” The Chinese Radicals: “H” and “ El” 3% “i? i5Ji%f! ‘Ji5 i'§H’£E6 (3) zifi it ’i59‘1"9: Tone Collocation in Trisyllabic Words (3): words starting with a third—tone syllable . i}. ii'.3'£47ii$ -. Single-Component Characters %. $.@ . iX$45?: %’ “)1” vfv “J ” Chinese Radicals: “)1 ” and “ 4 ” 3% ”177“'fli‘§-9133’ 1}'5H§~§E (4) : 192$ ‘at "iWT‘9< Tone Collocation in Trisyllabic Words (4): words starting with a fourth—tone syllable . ‘i}ii"~Z'; 'l? .47l5-§"- : Single-Component Characters: $. rh. 'E ‘_; l_, :?1%%_ “#37 fa “r. __» Chinese Radicals: ‘‘*~‘’’ and “Fr”
  20. 20. i%3‘C Text NT héo 4f'< 11?‘ Hello I. g- 01-1 1 N1 hire! 1'' English Version A: A: Hello! NT hdo! B: Hello! . L» B‘ ll‘ ”& New Words 1. ni pron. (singular) you 2. '11? héo adj. good, fine 3- 01-2 Nu’ n hdo! / English Version A: A: Hello! Nimen hdo! B: Hello! . A ‘ B‘ 1”‘ m ”I}! , New Words *3. nln pron. I (polite) you 4. 45141] nimen pron. (plural) you 3, 01-3 Duibuqil English Version A; A: I’m sorry! Méi guanxil B: That s OK! B: 7}: 5% T I New Words 5. 3lfl’7l: ;‘E-. dulbuqi v. to be sorry 6. $5196 , % méi gudnxi that’s OK, it doesn’t matter
  21. 21. liéilét Pinyin ‘}XiE? §TEi" 3-? $l]E"3 ( 1 ) Initials and Finals of Chinese Pinyin (1) 3. 01-4 E Initials ( 1) ea Finals < i) l b p m f i u U er _ I d t n I 0 io uo g k h o uo l j q x e ie Ue | oi uoi l ei uei (ui) oo ioo l I >‘XiEE’]; “5iJ%l (173%) iliafififizlifiilfilfilfll/ *, é: ‘%iJ%%~$ (55) %: i% (35) $3)? (214) vinfilllfi (51) O ?1i%Ei’~J$iJ%1ETIX%U§SLB4Jl’EH3Jo There are four basic tones in Chinese, respectively called the 1st tone (55), the 2nd tone (35), the 3rd tone (214) and the 4th tone (51). They make difference in meaning. Tones (Four Tones) 5 5 5 jj 5 4 4 ‘IIIIIIIII’ 4 3 3 3 ji 3 2 E 2; jig 2; 1 mo mo mo mo all’: /3?» 33 3-3 mother fibrous crops horse to scold Efliiéélifilleffi, E%$iJ%]Ei’~J$| ?l 01.5 Read the syllables aloud and pay attention to the tones. 6: éi (3 (‘J 6 C’) 6 c‘) é é é e T i’ T l U U U U G ii U ii‘
  22. 22. I/ —/ igfilli 1 Standard Course l §Xi§E’~]: §‘_fi Chinese Syllables i1i%EI’~J; ET”i1“—iil£EI3?= *-Eh "5J1%h ? =*'iJ%3%I3é3‘éfiflo —fi§7‘I€i5‘E, —/ M1? 3<im— I lE"ti7“o i1i%EI4J— I *E“iJEILJ‘i§7Ef-5, IE%—/ :“i§%7E%5J? Fii$iJ? fio A Chinese syllable is usually made up of an initial, a final and a tone. Generally speaking, one Chinese character corresponds to one syllable. A Chinese syllable can have no initial, but must have a final and a tone. iflififisfidfi Syllable E Initial E53 Final Eva Tone méo (3%, cat) m 00 ‘ yo (Q, fish) ii * jié (-klil, elder sister) j ie V ér (.1, two) er ii : ifiv U E1 fi¥k%i“i’7”FIa‘, ‘%4Ji3r? ‘ii'Ti“é. ”iJu y, ti J: éi’i3i%, §.%. -ii; u E] )5Yu’§i“1’7’H~‘I, *é3‘5Jfi”? i~'Ti‘%$’iJD W0 Note : When i or ii acts as a syllable by itself, y is added before it, with the two dots on the top of ii being removed; when it acts as a syllable by itself, w is added before it. EEIH‘, EBli—F§IJ$: élEiI+3‘lTjl«3i:5I‘ 01-6 Look at the pictures and read the monosyllabic words aloud. yi wu ér bi moo huéi ‘ I I ii qi xié
  23. 23. EEIH”, §}3i§§IA§II5IX”E‘41J5ifiji% 3, 01-7 Look at the pictures and read the disyllabic words aloud. E. T>‘fi’i‘E; d5*Ei“i3”E’~]i¥§3§iIfi %’iWi/ i‘§€: r€ia“”i*v‘i§is'eH~”I, ’§i%e/ i‘iati"v&; §*J’§i%Lr'= i, 3 + 3 2 + 30 his ilil “ni (Io) ” “héo (11%) ” “ni’ héo” 0 iE%E%Hfl‘. When two third—tone syllables are read in sequence, the first syllable tums into the second Tone Sandhi: 3rd tone + 3“ tone tone, i. e., the 3+3 sequence becomes a 2+3 one. For example, “ni ( (K ) ” + “hoo ( ii} ) ” is read “ni hoo”. However, when put in the written form, the original tone is kept. V + V —> / + V ni (1%) nan (11) ni’ nan ké (Er) yi (ix) ké yi ffi ($5) doo (3-) ft] doo E)§i§é‘F§| Jifli3Ei. ‘i5E%%Ei%‘E’? iv“E‘Jii% 01-8 Read the following words aloud and pay attention to the change in the tone of the 3” tone syllables. nl hoo kéyl ffidoo xioojié kouyfi yflfo Foyo too hoo Iioojié youhoo yoson shoubioo
  24. 24. ’I‘7f—? ’§$5l$E 1 Standard Course l .345 E 1%; Hi in 3’ M Classroom Expressions , I’_‘i¥I Shong ké! Class begins! Tia‘? ! Xio kél Class is over! ilI_. ;f§-. I7I§, E’; I Xionzoi xioxil Take a break now! 7% .32 mi Kon héibon! Look at the blackboard! I Gén wo do! Read after me! :1: >‘X$I§']%IEi(1I: -'(I(/ (~. Characters Strokes of Chinese Characters (1): — , 1 , /, ~ , %E%$iT Stroke i§%7§I'= U Direction {W573 Example Characters _’ héng g " yT one horizontal .1 ér two I 1.3» shi] I *I‘ SI'iI ten vertical . _1’_ gong work, labor / pié I / rén human left-falling / / bf] eight .25. dion Z: bi) no, not ‘ dot % 7‘? IICI six #3 no it dd big T R right-falling tiéin sky Single-Component Characters (1)“m” , iEI1:‘(1$I3’iJ%ZI§%@, iI_3.m$3'E5)7i§§l‘71$i§/733551? “I” o 4 2 ‘—-” is one of the basic strokes of Chinese characters. The single-component character “—’ means “one”. yi ti’, (2) “Z” , fifififi “2” O “: ” means “two”. , er -—- —> —: —> : i‘_ g:
  25. 25. (3) “E” , 3%/ fiiilfi “3” o “E” means “three”. son _—— ‘ 12 -F -- : > -—- —> —-' : > “ _, — j 51 {W (4) “+” , fififiifi “IO” 0 “+” means “ten”. i~i~i~$ <4/Kn , «<87! 0 “/ K” means “eight”. IVeH"*M= +;: at/ _n , 4469: O “Xi” means “six”. Iiu flnfinfiefi III 31%’?

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