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Thinking the Event, Thinking Change:
A new theory of change
for psychiatry and
psychotherapy
Vincenzo Di Nicola
Éloge à la complexité
49e
Congrès annuel de l’AMPQ
• Le Château Frontenac, Québec
• Samedi le 30 mai 2015
• 17h00 à 17h30
Thinking the Event,
Thinking Change
Vincenzo Di Nicola, MPhil, MD, PhD
• Psychologue, psychiatre, philosophe
• Professeur ...
Thinking the Event,
Thinking Change
Vincenzo Di Nicola, MPhil, MD, PhD
Conflicts of interest? Many!
• As a psychologist, a...
Thème : Des neurosciences à l’inconscient (2009)
Philosophy and Psychiatry:
Reflections of Mind
Vincenzo Di Nicola
Thème : À la recherche du sens (2014)
Philosopher en clinique :
Aider le patient à naviguer
entre sens et signification
Vi...
Thème : Éloge à la complexité (2015)
Thinking the Event, Thinking Change:
Capturing Complexity
Vincenzo Di Nicola
1. Introduce and define the notion of the Event based
on the philosophy of Alain Badiou into psychiatric
theory and practi...
Epigraph
• What will philosophy say to us? It will say:
“We must think the event.” We must think the
exception. We must kn...
Alain Badiou
(Né Rabat, 1937)
 “Geopoliticus child watching the birth
of the new man”
- Dali, 1943
Epigraph
• The philosopher’s treatment of a question
is like the treatment of an illness.
—Ludwig Wittgenstein
Le traiteme...
Ludwig Wittgenstein
(1889-1951)
Épigraphe
• Pour guérir quelle blessure, pour ôter
quelle écharde dans la chair de l’existence
suis-je devenu c’est qu’on ...
Epigraph
• What wound was I seeking to heal, what
thorn was I seeking to draw from the flesh of
existence when I became wh...
Qu’est-ce que la philosophie?
Deux types de philosophies
• Philosophies et anti-philosophies
– Alain Badiou
• Philosophies...
What is philosophy?
Two types of philosophy
• Philosophies and anti-philosophies
– Alain Badiou
• Systemic and edifying ph...
Qu’est-ce que la philosophie?
Philosophie/
Systématique
Rechercher de la vérité
Fondement, clarification,
consolation
• Pl...
L’Événement
The Event
Event refers to an occurrence or
experience in the lifeworld of
human beings which is an
exception o...
L’Événement
The Event
This notion of Event derives from
Being and Event –
the key work of French
philosopher Alain Badiou
L’Événement
The Event
Being and Event updates and
replaces subjective
phenomenology, the dominant
philosophy of the 20th c...
L’Événement
The Event
Phenomenological psychiatry became
the exemplary model for clinical
psychiatry for much of the last
...
L’Événement
The Event
Phenomenological psychiatry was an
attempt to capture the complexity of
human experience and relatio...
Objective
phenomenology
Badiou’s evental thought outlines a
new objective phenomenology for
philosophy and the human
scien...
Foundations of
phenomenology
• Phenomenology was founded by
Edmund Husserl (1859-1938)
in Germany
• Further elaborated by ...
Phenomenology in
psychiatry
• Phenomenology has now had
several generations of pioneering
psychiatrists apply philosophica...
Phenomenology in
psychiatry
• Edmund Husserl inspired Karl Jaspers’
phenomenological psychiatry (1913)
• Martin Heidegger’...
• Karl Jaspers
(1883-1959)
• Phenomenological
Psychiatrist
• Professor of
Philosophy
• General Psychopathology
Phenomenolo...
Phénoménologie et psychiatrie
existentielle
• Ludwig Binswanger
(1881-1966)
• « Daseinanalyse »
• « Der Fall Ellen West »
...
Phenomonology and existential
psychiatry
• Ludwig Binswanger
(1881-1966)
• Existential analysis
• « Der Fall Ellen West »
...
Phénoménologie et psychiatrie
existentielle
• R.D. Laing
(1927-1989)
• Psychiatre et
psychanalyste
• Philosophie et
psychi...
Phenomenology and existential
psychiatry
• R.D. Laing
(1927-1989)
• Psychiatrist and
psychoanalyst
• Social phenomenology
...
Phenomenology in
psychiatry
• Our generation now has the inspiration of
Alain Badiou’s objective phenomenology
outlined in...
Being and Event:
Ontology
• Badiou’s work is based not on a
critique or rejection of fundamentals
• Critical theory – Fran...
Trauma and Event:
A Philosophical Archaeology
• I recently conducted philosophical
investigations supervised by Badiou
for...
With Alain Badiou in Saas-Fe
European Graduate School, Saas-Fe, Switzerland – 2008-12
PhD, European Graduate School - 2012
Trauma and Event:
A Philosophical Archaeology
• We were struck by the parallels between
Event, as Badiou defined it, and
t...
Trauma and Event:
A Philosophical Archaeology
• Rupture – abîme, breach, break, caesura, chasm,
interruption, hiatus –
is ...
Trauma and Event:
A Philosophical Archaeology
• Event opens up – expands outward –
to a world of new possibilities and cha...
Trauma and Event:
A Philosophical Archaeology
Open closed open. Before we are born everything is open
in the universe with...
Trauma and Event:
A Philosophical Archaeology
• Event opens up – expands outward –
to a world of new possibilities and cha...
Trauma and Event:
A Philosophical Archaeology
Whether in clinical psychiatry (i.e., psychopathology)
or interventions (e.g...
Trauma and Event:
A Philosophical Archaeology
Whether in clinical psychiatry (i.e., psychopathology)
or interventions (e.g...
Trauma and Event:
A Philosophical Archaeology
Whether in clinical psychiatry (i.e., psychopathology)
or interventions (e.g...
Trauma and Event:
A Philosophical Archaeology
Event is a pivotal notion that offers
psychiatry and psychotherapy –
from ps...
Evental Psychiatry
La psychiatrie événementielle
The name that Badiou proposes for this bold
project is:
« La psychiatrie ...
Emergence of the
Evental Self
• Event requires three things:
– it must occur/be experienced
– it must be named (acknowledg...
Emergence of the
Evental Self
• An evental psychiatry will be a science
of “subjectivizable bodies”
• Badiou describes thi...
Emergence of the
Evental Self
• Badiou describes 3 types of subjects
each with key processes and
emblematic situations:
1....
Emergence of the
Evental Self
• These types of subject fundamentally define
the “attitudes” or possibilities of responding...
Emergence of the
Evental Self
1. Incorporation within the body
- the subject responds with enthusiasm for what is new,
wit...
Emergence of the
Evental Self
The faithful subject is marked by porosity (cf. Benjamin),
open to radical change and witnes...
Emergence of the
Evental Self
Two responses occur when porosity becomes a threat:
dissipation or mimesis.
These responses ...
Evental Therapy
• Evental therapy means entering people’s
predicaments to see if it could be an evental site for
them
• Ac...
Evental Therapy
• I call this process Evental therapy
• The experience is Evental being out of which an
Evental self emerg...
Model Events
1. Enhance uncertainty
2. Introduce novelty
3. Encourage diversity
Evental Analysis
• Evental analysis:
• The event has occurred
• novelty has been introduced …
• new and different ways of ...
Evental Analysis
• This is often missing in many therapies
• It means following people over time or studying what happens
...
Evental Therapy
Clinical practice
• E.g., Richard Mollica
Director, Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma
• Follows a group of...
Evental Therapy
Clinical case
• “The Memory Clinic vs. the Forgetting Clinic”
• Female adolescent refugee from Iraq, 14 ye...
Evental Therapy
• “The Memory Clinic vs. the Forgetting Clinic”
• Prescription:
View film, “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotle...
Evental Psychiatry
Conclusions
• Re: Change
• If we can capture complexity and normalize it, people
don’t need to change a...
Evental Psychiatry
Conclusions
• Evental Psychiatry offers:
• A theory of being (ontology) based on the Event
• A theory o...
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AMPQ - Thinking the event, thinking change - A new theory of change for psychiatry - 30 may 2015

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Event refers to an occurrence or experience in the lifeworld of human beings which is an exception or rupture that opens new horizons in life. It derives from Being and Event, the key work of philosopher Alain Badiou which updates and replaces subjective phenomenology, the dominant philosophy of the 20th century that was introduced into psychiatry a century ago through the seminal work of Karl Jaspers. Phenomenological psychiatry became the exemplary model for clinical psychiatry for much of the last century, with many elaborations and refinements by figures as diverse as Eugène Minkowski, Ludwig Binswanger and Ronald Laing.

Badiou’s evental thought outlines a new objective phenomenology for philosophy and the human sciences, including psychiatry. Ever since its foundation by Edmund Husserl, phenomenology has had pioneering psychiatrists apply its philosophy to clinical practice. Husserl inspired Jaspers’ phenomenological psychiatry, while his successor Martin Heidegger’s Being and Time inspired Binswanger’s existential analysis. Sartre’s reading of Heidegger in Being and Nothingness inspired the social phenomenology of Ronald Laing. Our generation now has the inspiration of Badiou’s objective phenomenology in Being and Event to revision psychiatry today. The author recently conducted philosophical investigations supervised by Badiou for his doctoral dissertation entitled Trauma and Event which re-examined trauma by contrasting it to the Event. Working closely with Badiou, the author proposes that the pivotal notion of the Event offers psychiatry and all forms of psychotherapy (from psychoanalysis to family therapy to cognitive therapy) a theory of change (evental being), a new definition of the subject (evental self), and therapeutic practices (evental therapy) that flow from that. Badiou affirms that the author’s proposal for an evental psychiatry opens a broad new horizon for philosophy and for psychiatry.

The presentation will outline three possible model Events for psychiatry and for psychotherapy with clinical illustrations. As well as describing the phenomena of psychiatry in a new, objective way and offering a new theory of change, evental psychiatry also accounts for a new definition of the subject of psychiatry and psychotherapy, the evental self. The self that emerges from the Event will be outlined and linked to contemporary issues in clinical psychiatry.

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • I wrote a theory of change for psychotherapy. The question begins with understanding what the origin of human suffering is. If and once that is identified, which must be understood as a subjective perception, however defined. Then one may be able to put forward a theory of change or as it is described in my writings a "mechanism of change". My theory of change is to realign the one's perceived suffering to one's perceived non-suffering, and then provide support for one to maintain that non-suffering on their own.
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AMPQ - Thinking the event, thinking change - A new theory of change for psychiatry - 30 may 2015

  1. 1. Thinking the Event, Thinking Change: A new theory of change for psychiatry and psychotherapy Vincenzo Di Nicola
  2. 2. Éloge à la complexité 49e Congrès annuel de l’AMPQ • Le Château Frontenac, Québec • Samedi le 30 mai 2015 • 17h00 à 17h30
  3. 3. Thinking the Event, Thinking Change Vincenzo Di Nicola, MPhil, MD, PhD • Psychologue, psychiatre, philosophe • Professeur titulaire, Université de Montréal
  4. 4. Thinking the Event, Thinking Change Vincenzo Di Nicola, MPhil, MD, PhD Conflicts of interest? Many! • As a psychologist, a psychiatrist and a philosopher – these are domains of inquiry and practice that are by definition critical and sceptical about truth claims and in conflict with each other! • Not faith-based
  5. 5. Thème : Des neurosciences à l’inconscient (2009) Philosophy and Psychiatry: Reflections of Mind Vincenzo Di Nicola
  6. 6. Thème : À la recherche du sens (2014) Philosopher en clinique : Aider le patient à naviguer entre sens et signification Vincenzo Di Nicola
  7. 7. Thème : Éloge à la complexité (2015) Thinking the Event, Thinking Change: Capturing Complexity Vincenzo Di Nicola
  8. 8. 1. Introduce and define the notion of the Event based on the philosophy of Alain Badiou into psychiatric theory and practice. 1. Outliine evental being, a new theory of change for psychiatry and psychotherapy based on the Event. 1. Demonstrate how evental being, a new theory of change, creates a new objective phenomenology for psychiatry and a new definition of the subject with the notion of the evental self. Pedagogical Objectives
  9. 9. Epigraph • What will philosophy say to us? It will say: “We must think the event.” We must think the exception. We must know what we have to say about that which is not ordinary. We must think change in life. —Alain Badiou Ref: Alain Badiou, Polemics, trans. and with an introduction by Steve Corcoran (2006), p. 8.
  10. 10. Alain Badiou (Né Rabat, 1937)
  11. 11.  “Geopoliticus child watching the birth of the new man” - Dali, 1943
  12. 12. Epigraph • The philosopher’s treatment of a question is like the treatment of an illness. —Ludwig Wittgenstein Le traitement du philosophe d’une question c’est comme le traitement d’une maladie. Ref: Ludwig Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations (1953) §255, p. 91.
  13. 13. Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951)
  14. 14. Épigraphe • Pour guérir quelle blessure, pour ôter quelle écharde dans la chair de l’existence suis-je devenu c’est qu’on appelle un philosophe? —Alain Badiou Réf : Alain Badiou, « Préface », Quentin Meillassoux, Après la finitude (2006), p. 9.
  15. 15. Epigraph • What wound was I seeking to heal, what thorn was I seeking to draw from the flesh of existence when I became what is called “a philosopher”? —Alain Badiou Ref: “Preface,” Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude, trans. by Ray Brassier (2008), p. vi.
  16. 16. Qu’est-ce que la philosophie? Deux types de philosophies • Philosophies et anti-philosophies – Alain Badiou • Philosophies systématiques et édifiantes – Richard Rorty
  17. 17. What is philosophy? Two types of philosophy • Philosophies and anti-philosophies – Alain Badiou • Systemic and edifying philosophies – Richard Rorty
  18. 18. Qu’est-ce que la philosophie? Philosophie/ Systématique Rechercher de la vérité Fondement, clarification, consolation • Plato, Aristotle • Aquinas, Augustine • Husserl, Heidegger • Wm James • Badiou Anti-philosophie/ Édifiante Intérroger des vérités Déconstruction, problématisation • Héraclite • Nietzsche, Marx • Wittgenstein • Freud, Lacan • Derrida, Foucault, Rorty
  19. 19. L’Événement The Event Event refers to an occurrence or experience in the lifeworld of human beings which is an exception or rupture that opens new horizons in life
  20. 20. L’Événement The Event This notion of Event derives from Being and Event – the key work of French philosopher Alain Badiou
  21. 21. L’Événement The Event Being and Event updates and replaces subjective phenomenology, the dominant philosophy of the 20th century that was introduced into psychiatry a century ago through the seminal work of Karl Jaspers
  22. 22. L’Événement The Event Phenomenological psychiatry became the exemplary model for clinical psychiatry for much of the last century, with many elaborations and refinements by figures as diverse as Eugène Minkowski (France), Ludwig Binswanger (Switzerland) and Ronald Laing (Britain)
  23. 23. L’Événement The Event Phenomenological psychiatry was an attempt to capture the complexity of human experience and relations in clinical psychiatry – not to simply, reduce or tame them
  24. 24. Objective phenomenology Badiou’s evental thought outlines a new objective phenomenology for philosophy and the human sciences, including psychiatry
  25. 25. Foundations of phenomenology • Phenomenology was founded by Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) in Germany • Further elaborated by his student Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) to become one of the dominant schools of philosophical thought of the 20th century
  26. 26. Phenomenology in psychiatry • Phenomenology has now had several generations of pioneering psychiatrists apply philosophical method to clinical practice
  27. 27. Phenomenology in psychiatry • Edmund Husserl inspired Karl Jaspers’ phenomenological psychiatry (1913) • Martin Heidegger’s Being and Time (1927) inspired Ludwig Binswanger’s existential analysis exposed in his famous case of Ellen West (1943-1944) • Jean-Paul Sartre’s reading of Heidegger in Being and Nothingness (1943) inspired the social phenomenology of Ronald Laing in The Divided Self (1960) and Self and Others (1961)
  28. 28. • Karl Jaspers (1883-1959) • Phenomenological Psychiatrist • Professor of Philosophy • General Psychopathology Phenomenology and existential psychiatry
  29. 29. Phénoménologie et psychiatrie existentielle • Ludwig Binswanger (1881-1966) • « Daseinanalyse » • « Der Fall Ellen West » avec multiples lecteurs (Foucault, R.D. Laing)
  30. 30. Phenomonology and existential psychiatry • Ludwig Binswanger (1881-1966) • Existential analysis • « Der Fall Ellen West » with many readings (Foucault, R.D. Laing)
  31. 31. Phénoménologie et psychiatrie existentielle • R.D. Laing (1927-1989) • Psychiatre et psychanalyste • Philosophie et psychiatrie existentielle • Psychiatrie critique
  32. 32. Phenomenology and existential psychiatry • R.D. Laing (1927-1989) • Psychiatrist and psychoanalyst • Social phenomenology • Critical psychiatry
  33. 33. Phenomenology in psychiatry • Our generation now has the inspiration of Alain Badiou’s objective phenomenology outlined in Being and Event to revision psychiatry today
  34. 34. Being and Event: Ontology • Badiou’s work is based not on a critique or rejection of fundamentals • Critical theory – Frankfurt School • Anti-foundational – Richard Rorty • Badiou returns to fundamentals, to ontology – the science of being
  35. 35. Trauma and Event: A Philosophical Archaeology • I recently conducted philosophical investigations supervised by Badiou for my doctoral dissertation, Trauma and Event (2012) • We re-examined trauma by contrasting it to the Event
  36. 36. With Alain Badiou in Saas-Fe European Graduate School, Saas-Fe, Switzerland – 2008-12 PhD, European Graduate School - 2012
  37. 37. Trauma and Event: A Philosophical Archaeology • We were struck by the parallels between Event, as Badiou defined it, and trauma, the subject of my work • In his definition of Event, I seized the key idea of rupture • For Badiou, Event heralds novation – bringing into the world something new • Trauma, too, is a rupture
  38. 38. Trauma and Event: A Philosophical Archaeology • Rupture – abîme, breach, break, caesura, chasm, interruption, hiatus – is the link between these two notions • Whereas Event opens a breach that leads to novation – the emergency of novelty and change • Trauma occurs when the breach shuts down the capacity for novelty and change, leading to repetition and stagnation
  39. 39. Trauma and Event: A Philosophical Archaeology • Event opens up – expands outward – to a world of new possibilities and change • Trauma closes down – withdraws inward – foreclosing adaptation and change
  40. 40. Trauma and Event: A Philosophical Archaeology Open closed open. Before we are born everything is open in the universe without us. For as long as we live, everything is closed within us. And when we die, everything is open again. Open closed open. That’s all we are. —Yehuda Amichai, Open Closed Open
  41. 41. Trauma and Event: A Philosophical Archaeology • Event opens up – expands outward – to a world of new possibilities and change • Trauma closes down – withdraws inward – foreclosing adaptation and change • A consequence of these investigations led me to reflect on the problems of psychiatry with change • Whether in clinical psychiatry (i.e., psychopathology) or interventions (e.g., psychotherapies) we have no theory of change!
  42. 42. Trauma and Event: A Philosophical Archaeology Whether in clinical psychiatry (i.e., psychopathology) or interventions (e.g., psychotherapies) we have no theory of change! • Description is not explanation – cf. Thomas Insel’s critique of DSM5 – e.g., describing processes, procedures, steps is not the same as explaining them – cf. behavioural slogan: Insight does not equal behaviour change
  43. 43. Trauma and Event: A Philosophical Archaeology Whether in clinical psychiatry (i.e., psychopathology) or interventions (e.g., psychotherapies) we have no theory of change! • Procedural knowledge or wisdom is not theory – cf. empiricism – e.g., methods and procedures neither explain (insight) nor instruct (theorize) – e.g., Why Lacan and not Klein? Why DBT or CBT? Why flooding instead of SD? (The answer is edifying vs. systematic philosophy)
  44. 44. Trauma and Event: A Philosophical Archaeology Whether in clinical psychiatry (i.e., psychopathology) or interventions (e.g., psychotherapies) we have no theory of change! Conclusion: • Currently, we cannot adequately explain (gain insight) or instruct (theorize) change in psychiatry and psychotherapy
  45. 45. Trauma and Event: A Philosophical Archaeology Event is a pivotal notion that offers psychiatry and psychotherapy – from psychoanalysis to family therapy to cognitive therapy – • a theory of change (evental being) • a new definition of the subject (evental self) • therapeutic practices (evental therapy)
  46. 46. Evental Psychiatry La psychiatrie événementielle The name that Badiou proposes for this bold project is: « La psychiatrie événementielle » Evental Psychiatry Badiou affirmed that the author’s proposal opens a broad new horizon for philosophy and for psychiatry
  47. 47. Emergence of the Evental Self • Event requires three things: – it must occur/be experienced – it must be named (acknowledgement – which is why “testimony/witness” is so important) – it must be integrated into our lives – we must be faithful to it • Fidelity to the Event makes us subjects, what Badiou calls a “subject to truth”
  48. 48. Emergence of the Evental Self • An evental psychiatry will be a science of “subjectivizable bodies” • Badiou describes this as the “pivotal concept” of his philosophy
  49. 49. Emergence of the Evental Self • Badiou describes 3 types of subjects each with key processes and emblematic situations: 1. The faithful subject 2. The reactive subject 3. The obscure subject
  50. 50. Emergence of the Evental Self • These types of subject fundamentally define the “attitudes” or possibilities of responding to the situation (Badiou’s description in Being and Event, BE I), the world (his description in Logics of World, BE II) or the predicament in my psychiatric formulation • Badiou calls these attitudes subjectivations that “prescribe” the 3 type of subjects
  51. 51. Emergence of the Evental Self 1. Incorporation within the body - the subject responds with enthusiasm for what is new, with active fidelity to the event, which is “a perturbation of the world’s order” - this is the hallmark of the faithful subject 2. Indifference to the event - this reactive, conservative position typifies the reactive subject 3. Hostility to all that is new or “modern” - this intense response to “the new body as a malevolent foreign irruption that must be destroyed” - the obscure subject wants to maintain tradition at all costs
  52. 52. Emergence of the Evental Self The faithful subject is marked by porosity (cf. Benjamin), open to radical change and witnessing (e.g., Paul of Tarsus, Primo Levi, Agamben) of desire through processes of absorption/incorporation.
  53. 53. Emergence of the Evental Self Two responses occur when porosity becomes a threat: dissipation or mimesis. These responses are described through these pairs: centrifugal vs. centripetal, dispersal vs. containment and evacuation vs. encapsulation. The reactive subject, who is marked by dissipation, experiences rupture as trauma through a process of dispersal/evacuation. The obscure subject is marked by mimesis, whose emblematic experience is paranoia, triggered by failed attempts at containment/encapsulation.
  54. 54. Evental Therapy • Evental therapy means entering people’s predicaments to see if it could be an evental site for them • Accompany them in the Event • How to prepare for it, how to recognize it when it happens, what to call it, and how to prepare for and to live new lives in the face of the Event
  55. 55. Evental Therapy • I call this process Evental therapy • The experience is Evental being out of which an Evental self emerges • The quality that is required for living through an Event is fidelity
  56. 56. Model Events 1. Enhance uncertainty 2. Introduce novelty 3. Encourage diversity
  57. 57. Evental Analysis • Evental analysis: • The event has occurred • novelty has been introduced … • new and different ways of living are encouraged • what Badiou calls fidelity to the event
  58. 58. Evental Analysis • This is often missing in many therapies • It means following people over time or studying what happens after an Event occurs in their lives (follow-through, rather than follow-up) • Not encouraged by the current models of brief interventions, “episode de soins” and operational end-points • Isolated and professionalized practices and the retreat of the helping professions into the institution (retreat from the community mental health movement) • It is possible in community practices or practices which decrease the boundaries and barriers between people and providers of health services
  59. 59. Evental Therapy Clinical practice • E.g., Richard Mollica Director, Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma • Follows a group of Cambodian refugees in his Massachusetts community for decades • Mollica doesn’t close their cases and he doesn’t make diagnoses • Imagine – a mainstream psychiatrist at one of the world’s premier medical faculties who doesn’t use diagnoses or medications, an expert in trauma who doesn’t diagnose PTSD!
  60. 60. Evental Therapy Clinical case • “The Memory Clinic vs. the Forgetting Clinic” • Female adolescent refugee from Iraq, 14 years Sx: oppositional, rebellious, Dx: PTSD • What do you want? I want to forget! • Intervention: This is the memory clinic! - “Je me souviens” • Reply: I’m in the wrong place. I want the forgetting clinic.
  61. 61. Evental Therapy • “The Memory Clinic vs. the Forgetting Clinic” • Prescription: View film, “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” • Formulation: Complex – war, displacement, migration, cut-offs – behavioural manifestations No evidence of PTSD or traumatic impacts • Recommendation: Witness, destigmatize, remove PTSD dx, capture complexity
  62. 62. Evental Psychiatry Conclusions • Re: Change • If we can capture complexity and normalize it, people don’t need to change as much as they – or others – think they do • Change is based on the Event, predicated on rupture which may be experienced as a traumatic closing down or an evental opening out to novelty through adaptation and new constructions of the self
  63. 63. Evental Psychiatry Conclusions • Evental Psychiatry offers: • A theory of being (ontology) based on the Event • A theory of change – Evental being • A new definition of the subject – Evental self • Therapeutic practices – Evental therapy

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