Australian Jobs 2012

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Facts & figures and outlook of Australian Jobs 2012 - 2017

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Australian Jobs 2012

  1. 1. Minister’s foreword 2012AUSTRALIAN JOBS AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 1
  2. 2. Contents National, state and territory labour markets INTRODUCTION Labour market overview 4 The Australian Jobs publication presents summary information for people National overview 5 exploring careers, and education and training options, as well as those New South Wales 6 currently looking for work or wanting assistance to enter or re-enter the Victoria 7 labour market. The publication includes past and projected employment Queensland 8 trends, by industry and occupation, as well as information about skills. South Australia 9 Australian Jobs provides a snapshot of the Australian labour market Western Australia 10 and introduces readers to a range of information about the workforce, Tasmania 11 employment and training. The data may spark the interest of some Northern Territory 12 readers to explore more detailed information about particular Australian Capital Territory 12 occupations, industries or local labour markets. If further information is required, a page of useful websites and links is included on the inside back cover of the publication. Industries Clearly, a higher skilled workforce has benefits for the economy and for Industry overview 13 individuals. In recognition of the importance of skills and employment, Structural change 14 the Australian Government has recently announced a number of initiatives Apprentices and trainees by industry 15 to skill more Australians, and it also supports job seekers through Job Accommodation and Food Services 15 Services Australia. Information about these initiatives is included on Administrative and Support Services 16 pages 32 and 33. Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 16 Arts and Recreation Services 17 The Australian labour market is continuously changing, as we move to a Construction 17 sustainable, low carbon economy. This year, the Australian Jobs publication includes information to help readers understand structural change and the Education and Training 18 skills and attributes that employers are looking for in 2012, covering Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 18 employability skills and skills for sustainability (see page 28). Financial and Insurance Services 19 Health Care and Social Assistance 19 Although information contained in Australian Jobs 2012 is as up-to-date Information Media and Telecommunications 20 as we can make it, the labour market can change quickly and the skills Manufacturing 20 needed by employers vary across industries and geographic locations. Mining 21 Consequently, employment and training decisions need to be based on a range of information including expectations about pay, working conditions, Other Services 21 skills and interests as well as training requirements and long term goals. Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 22 Public Administration and Safety 22 Consider information from a wide range of sources. School careers Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 23 advisers, Australian and state/territory government websites and Retail Trade 23 employment service providers can all help (see page 43 for useful sites). Transport, Postal and Warehousing 24 Wholesale Trade 24 Inquiries about Australian Jobs should be directed to Occupations and skills AustralianJobs@deewr.gov.au Occupational overview 25 Skill level overview 26 The contents of Australian Jobs 2012 are based on information The next five years 27 available at the time of publication. Over time, the reliability of the What do employers look for when recruiting? 28 data and analysis may diminish. The Commonwealth, its officers, Which jobs have the best prospects? 29 employees and agents do not accept responsibility for any Education and employment 30 inaccuracies contained in the report or for any negligence in the Employment and education services 32 compilation of the report and disclaim liability for any loss suffered by any person arising from the use of this report. Labour market Australian Jobs Matrix information must be used cautiously as employment prospects can change over time and vary by region. It is important in making and Guide to the Australian Jobs Matrix 34 assessing career choices to consider all factors, including interest Australian Jobs Matrix 35 and aptitudes, remuneration and expectations, and the requirements Australian Jobs 2012 data sources 42 of occupations. Useful websites and links 432 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012
  3. 3. Minister’s forewordThe Australian economy is continuously adapting to change. We are currently in an important era of generational change driven bygrowing demand from Asian markets, new technologies, the shift to a low carbon economy and the challenges of an ageing workforce.There is a key role for government in managing the transformation process and maximising the opportunities for all Australians toparticipate in meaningful and productive work.Over the past year, the pace of employment growth in Australia has moderated. While Australia has not been immune from internationaleconomic conditions, we still have one of the strongest economies in the industrialised world with one of the lowest unemployment rates.Highlighting the resilience of our labour market is the fact that record numbers of Australians have a job. While some industries andregions are clearly doing it tough in a difficult economic climate, others are recording particularly strong jobs growth, providing manyopportunities for Australian job seekers.The Australian Government understands the importance that having a job has for individuals and families and also the importance tothe economy of a skilled and productive workforce. It continues to be committed to providing opportunities for all Australians to haverewarding employment through better access to training, higher standards of education, improved childcare and employment servicesand a strong economy. In addition, the Building Australia’s Future Workforce package is providing a significant investment in increasingparticipation among key groups who are at risk of falling behind. The Government is also investing a further $8.5 billion in employmentservices over the next four years to assist people back into employment.Supporting more Australians to gain skills, the Government has announced a wide array of initiatives. As part of its $1.75 billion offer tothe states and territories to reform the training system, the Commonwealth is asking states and territories to introduce an entitlement totraining for anyone of working age without a Certificate III or higher qualification. It has also made landmark reforms which have alreadyenhanced access to university study, with the number of students enrolled at a record high. In addition, the establishment of the MyUniversity and the My Skills (to be released later in 2012) websites provides Australians with vital and comparable information to helpthem to choose the right training options.Australian Jobs 2012 also supports this aim by providing a wealth of information about the current and future labour market, includinginformation about industries, occupations and states and territories. It also provides an insight into Australian Government services thatcan assist those interested in employment, education or training.I encourage you to consider the valuable analysis of the labour market which is included in Australian Jobs and to explore the other usefulresources referenced in this publication.Bill Shorten AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 3
  4. 4. National, state and territory labour markets LABOUR MARKET OVERVIEW The changing labour market Regional labour markets Technological change, greater labour market flexibility and economic Recently, Australia has seen the emergence of a ‘multispeed’ economy and reforms have helped to transform people’s working arrangements and have labour market, with some states, regions and sectors performing strongly, been associated with a significant improvement in labour market conditions while others struggle. For instance, the resource-rich states of Western between the end of the early 1990s recession and the onset of the global Australia and Queensland continue to benefit from high commodity prices recession in September 2008. Indeed, over the 15 years to September and the associated Mining boom, while the trade-exposed sectors in states 2008, employment growth was exceptionally strong, increasing by around such as Victoria and Tasmania, are feeling the effects of the high Australian 3.2 million (an annual average rate of 2.3%). Full-time employment rose by dollar and weaker demand, resulting in softer labour market conditions. 1.9 million over the period (an annual average rate of 1.9%), while part-time • Over the year to March 2012, employment increased significantly in employment increased by 1.3 million (an annual average rate of 3.5%), Western Australia, up by 44 900 (or 3.7%), and the unemployment although the rise in part-time employment was off a much lower base. rate declined by 0.3 percentage points to 4.1%, well below the national figure of 5.2%. The State’s participation rate increased by 0.7 Recent developments in the labour market percentage points over the year to 68.9%, the highest of any state. Following the onset of the global recession in September 2008, the • By contrast, labour market conditions in Victoria (with greater exposure Australian labour market deteriorated, with employment growth stalling and to Manufacturing, which is hard hit by the high Australian dollar and the unemployment rate peaking at 5.9% in June 2009. competitive pressures) deteriorated over the year to March 2012. Employment fell by 22 800 (or 0.8%) over the year, and the unemployment Nevertheless, the Australian economy and labour market displayed rate rose by 1.4 percentage points to 5.8% in March 2012. Over the remarkable resilience and fared much better than most other major period, the participation rate fell by 0.4 percentage points to 65.3%. advanced economies over 2010, with employment growing by a robust 3.3%, the unemployment rate falling to 4.9% in December 2010 and the The ‘multispeed’ nature of the economy is also evident at the regional level. participation rate1 reaching a near record high of 65.8%. In March 2012, the disparity in regional unemployment rates (the highest and lowest) was at 8.5 percentage points, only just below the 9.9 percentage Since then, however, financial market volatility and global uncertainty have points recorded in August 2009, at the height of the global recession, and resulted in a fall in business confidence and a hesitancy on the part of firms well above the 4.9 percentage points recorded in April 2008. to hire new staff, while a strong Australian dollar together with cautious consumer sentiment have dampened economic and labour market activity in the non-mining sectors. As a consequence, the pace of trend Regional Disparity, March 2008 to March 2012 employment growth has slowed, to an average of 6500 jobs per month in 14 March 2012 (significantly below the recent peak of 38 000 jobs per month 12 in August 2010), while the unemployment rate has edged up to 5.2% in March 2012. Despite the softening in labour market conditions over the 10 year to March 2012, the Australian labour market remains one of the best Unemployment rate (%) 8 performing in the advanced world, with an unemployment rate around half 9.9 percentage points 8.5 percentage points that of the Euro Area (10.8%) and well below the rate in the United States 6 (8.2%) and United Kingdom (8.3%). 4.9 percentage points 4 2 Unemployment Rate and Annual Employment Growth, March 1992 to March 2012 (%) 0 8 9 0 1 8 8 9 9 0 0 1 1 2 8 9 0 1 c-0 c-0 c-1 c-1 r-0 p-0 r-0 p-0 r-1 p-1 r-1 p-1 r-1 n-0 n-0 n-1 n-1 Ma Ma Ma Ma Ma De De De De Se Se Se Se Ju Ju Ju Ju Lowest Unemployment Rate Highest Unemployment Rate 12 8 Source: ABS Labour Force Survey 10 6 Annual Employment Growth (%) Canterbury-Bankstown, in Sydney, provides an illustration of a poorly 8 Unemployment Rate (%) 4 performing region. Employment declined by 6300 (or 4.3%) over the year to 6 2 March 2012, and the unemployment rate stood at 7.7% in March 2012, well above the national average, and the participation rate stood at 56.5%, 4 0 well below the national average of around 65%. 2 -2 By contrast, employment in Remainder-Balance WA (see page 10 for map) increased by a robust 7300 (or 5.1%) over the year to March 2012, 0 -4 strengthening from the increase recorded over the year to November 2011. Ma -11 Ma -92 Ma -93 Ma -95 Ma -96 Ma -97 Ma -98 Ma -99 Ma -00 Ma -01 Ma -02 Ma -03 Ma -05 Ma -06 Ma -07 Ma -08 Ma -09 Ma -10 2 Ma 4 Ma -04 r-1 r-9 The unemployment rate declined by 1.6 percentage points over the year r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r Ma Unemployment Rate (%) Annual Employment Growth (%) to 2.4% in March 2012, the lowest of any region in Australia. The large Source: ABS Labour Force Survey decrease in the unemployment rate occurred in conjunction with a strong (0.8 percentage point) increase in the participation rate over the year to March 2012, to 70.3%, well above the comparable national average. 1 The participation rate is the proportion of people aged 15 years or older who are either working or looking for work.4 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www.deewr.gov.au/lmip
  5. 5. National, state and territory labour marketsNATIONAL OVERVIEWAustralia’s labour market Regional labour marketsEmployment There are sound opportunities for employment outside Australia’s state capitalNovember 2011 (number) 11 456 500 cities. More than one in every three of the nation’s workers (37% of the5 year change to November 2011 (%) 10.4 workforce or more than 4 million people) are employed in regional Australia.Working part-time (%) 30 The labour market varies markedly across regions with a number of areasFemale (%) 46Aged 45 years or older (%) 38 experiencing strong employment growth and low unemployment rates.Employment outside state capital cities (%) 37 Even in regions where unemployment is relatively high, some employersEducational profile experience difficulty recruiting, particularly for skilled occupations.With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) 27 Workers in regional areas are less likely to have studied after they have leftWith VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) 29 school than those in the state capital cities, and many do not have the skillsWithout post-school qualifications (%) 37 needed for local vacancies (skill shortages are particularly evident in some regional areas). Tertiary education is accessible to Australians across theAustralia’s population is around 22.6 million and almost 11.5 million country, including in regional locations, and clearly there are realAustralians are employed. The workforce is highly concentrated with more advantages for workers in regional Australia to gain post-schoolthan three in four workers employed in the three most populous states. qualifications to meet the skill needs of employers.New South Wales is the largest employing state (with 3.6 million workers),followed by Victoria (almost 2.9 million), and Queensland (2.4 million). It is also interesting to note that over the year to November 2011, regionalThe smallest employing state is Tasmania (237 600 workers), although employment growth exceeded the capital city growth rate in all statesthe ACT and the Northern Territory have smaller workforces. except Tasmania. This highlights the increasing demand for workers in regional Australia.The largest numbers of new jobs created over the five years to November2011 were in the three largest states of Victoria (up by 307 200 or 12.0%), The table below compares key labour market data across state capital citiesNew South Wales (288 100 or 8.7%) and Queensland (234 000 or 11.1%). and regional areas. It shows that, generally speaking, the workforce tends toAlthough the employment growth rate was strongest in the Northern be older in regional areas than in metropolitan areas. This suggests there willTerritory, the small size of its workforce means there was a relatively be strong demand for workers in these areas to replace those who retire oversmall number of new jobs, 19 000 (or around 2% of new jobs nationally). the next decade.Australia has an ageing workforce, with almost two out of every five workers(38%) aged 45 years or older, up from 33% a decade ago.Employment by Location Employment Employment profile Educational profile Employ’t Employ’t Aged Employed change change younger Aged 45 persons without Employ’t 1 year 5 years Working than 25 years or post-school Nov 2011 to Nov 2011 to Nov 2011 part-time Female years older qualifications ‘000 ‘000 % ‘000 % % % % % %Cities and regionsSydney 2346.3 47.1 2.1 190.1 8.8 28 45 16 36 36Regional NSW 1256.3 32.2 2.6 135.3 12.1 33 45 16 43 43Melbourne 2143.4 40.4 1.9 252.2 13.3 29 45 17 36 39Regional VIC 736.0 28.6 4.0 92.3 14.3 33 45 16 43 46Brisbane 1071.9 10.1 1.0 97.3 10.0 27 46 19 35 43Regional QLD 1264.4 23.5 1.9 174.7 16.0 30 46 17 40 49Adelaide 605.7 5.6 0.9 47.0 8.4 33 47 18 39 44Regional SA 214.2 4.8 2.3 14.6 7.3 32 44 15 46 52Perth 922.7 15.0 1.7 125.3 15.7 30 45 18 37 42Regional WA 310.6 8.4 2.8 31.7 11.4 25 42 15 42 50Hobart 103.9 1.9 1.8 6.2 6.4 35 49 17 42 43Regional Tasmania 133.8 -0.4 -0.3 6.8 5.4 34 46 17 44 49States and territoriesNew South Wales 3605.2 6.1 0.2 288.1 8.7 30 45 16 39 35Victoria 2875.6 13.5 0.5 307.2 12.0 31 45 17 38 36Queensland 2351.0 20.5 0.9 234.0 11.1 28 46 18 38 39South Australia 820.9 6.5 0.8 53.0 6.9 34 46 17 41 41Western Australia 1238.7 14.6 1.2 151.2 13.9 29 44 17 38 41Tasmania 237.6 -0.1 0.0 13.7 6.1 35 47 17 43 41Northern Territory 123.7 1.2 1.0 19.0 18.2 18 47 16 37 43Australian Capital Territory 204.2 -1.0 -0.5 9.6 4.9 25 48 17 36 29Australia 11 456.5 62.8 0.6 1077.4 10.4 30 46 17 38 37Sources: ABS Labour Force Survey. ABS Survey of Education and Work. 2006 Census.For more information see www.deewr.gov.au/lmip AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 5
  6. 6. National, state and territory labour markets NEW SOUTH WALES New South Wales is the largest employing state, with almost one in every Regional New South Wales three Australian workers (3.6 million). Employment is concentrated in Sydney which has almost two thirds of the state’s employment. The largest Slightly more than one third of workers in the state are employed in regional employing industries are Health Care and Social Assistance (416 200), areas. Around 60% of these people work in three of the nine regions: Retail Trade (384 100) and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Newcastle; Northern, North Western and Central West; and Richmond- (305 000), which collectively account for about 30% of employment. Tweed and Mid-North Coast. Employment rose by 8.7% or 288 100 over the five years to November Over the year to November 2011, employment grew more strongly in 2011, compared with national growth of 10.4%. The largest numbers regional New South Wales than it did in Sydney (2.6% compared with of new jobs are in Health Care and Social Assistance (85 900), 2.1%). The strongest growth was in South Eastern (up by 8.9% or 9500). Accommodation and Food Services (41 500) and Professional, Scientific Employment fell in two regions, with the largest fall being in the Hunter. and Technical Services (40 300). Over the year to November 2011, The largest employing industries in regional New South Wales are Health Care employment increased by 0.2%, compared with national growth of 0.6%. and Social Assistance (155 000), Retail Trade (139 600) and Manufacturing The workforce is relatively highly skilled with 64% of workers holding a (109 000). Over the year to November 2011, most new jobs were in post-school qualification. It also has a slightly higher proportion of workers Accommodation and Food Services (13 100) and Professional, Scientific who hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification than the national and Technical Services (9700). average (29% compared with 27%). Regional areas have a lower proportion of people participating in the Around 70% of workers are employed full-time, and 45% are female. workforce (60% compared with 66% in Sydney). Employment by Region, Nov 2011 (% of state total) Employment Change, Year to Nov 2011 (%) Population and Employment Population Employment Employment profile (% of region’s workforce) 1 year Aged Without change 1 year younger Aged 45 Bachelor Cert III/IV post- June to June Nov % of change to than 25 years or degree or or higher school 2011 2011 2011 total Nov 2011 years older higher qual VET qual qual ‘000 % ‘000 % ‘000 % % % % % % Sydney 4627.3 1.3 2346.3 65.1 47.1 2.1 16 36 29 26 36 Richmond-Tweed and 560.8 0.8 238.8 6.6 15.5 6.9 15 47 15 31 43 Mid-North Coast Murray-Murrumbidgee 279.5 0.4 137.6 3.8 1.7 1.3 16 46 14 29 47 Newcastle 552.8 1.3 271.5 7.5 5.4 2.0 18 36 17 33 41 Hunter 105.8 1.1 49.2 1.4 -2.0 -3.9 13 51 11 34 45 Wollongong 293.5 0.6 127.0 3.5 2.5 2.0 17 39 19 33 38 Illawarra 145.4 1.2 65.1 1.8 2.4 3.8 20 45 16 34 40 South Eastern 221.1 0.8 116.3 3.2 9.5 8.9 13 51 17 30 43 Northern, North Western and 493.5 0.7 241.2 6.7 -3.2 -1.3 17 44 14 29 46 Central West Far West 22.5 -0.4 9.6 0.3 0.5 5.2 7 38 12 27 51 New South Wales 7302.2 1.1 3605.2 100.0 6.1 0.2 16 39 29 30 35 Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2011. Employment data are ABS LFS Nov 2011 (state data are trend, capital city and regional figures are 12 month average). Educational attainment data for states are ABS Survey of Education and Work 2011, state capital city and regional figures are from ABS 2006 Census (latest available)6 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www.deewr.gov.au/lmip
  7. 7. National, state and territory labour marketsVICTORIAVictoria is the second largest employing state, with a quarter of the nation’s Regional Victoriaemployment (almost 2.9 million). The largest employing industries are Health State employment is highly concentrated in Melbourne which accountsCare and Social Assistance (336 700), Retail Trade (317 200) and Manufacturing for almost three in four workers. Outside the state capital, employment(302 700), which combined have around one third of state employment. is relatively evenly distributed across the five regions, with each havingEmployment increased by 12.0% (or 307 200) over the five years to between 3.7% and 6.8% of the state’s workers. The largest employingNovember 2011, a slightly stronger growth rate than the national average regions are Barwon-Western District (196 700) and Goulburn-Ovens-of 10.4%. Employment rose in 17 of the 19 industries, with the largest Murray (149 100). Over the year to November 2011, employment growthnumbers of new jobs created in Health Care and Social Assistance was strongest in Loddon-Mallee (up by 7.8% or 10 300) and Central(63 500), Construction (41 700) and Professional, Scientific and Technical Highlands-Wimmera (4.8% or 4800).Services (39 400). The largest fall in employment was in Manufacturing The largest employing industries in regional Victoria are Health Care and(down by 15 200 or 4.8%). Over the year to November 2011, employment Social Assistance (94 600), Retail Trade (93 700) and Manufacturingin Victoria increased by 0.5% compared with national growth of 0.6%. (79 800). Over the year to November 2011, the largest numbers of jobsThe Victorian workforce is relatively highly skilled with 30% of workers holding created in regional Victoria were in Retail Trade (up by 12 800) and Healtha Bachelor degree or higher qualification compared with 27% nationally. Care and Social Assistance (10 000).About 45% of workers are female and 31% of workers are employed Regional Victoria has a relatively low proportion of people participatingpart-time (compared with 46% and 30% respectively for Australia). in the workforce (64% compared with 67% in Melbourne).The proportion of Victorian workers who are aged 45 years and olderis the same as the national average (38%).Employment by Region, Nov 2011 (% of state total) Employment Change, Year to Nov 2011 (%)Population and Employment Population Employment Employment profile (% of region’s workforce) 1 year Aged Without change 1 year younger Aged 45 Bachelor Cert III/IV post- June to June Nov % of change to than 25 years or degree or or higher school 2011 2011 2011 total Nov 2011 years older higher qual VET qual qual ‘000 % ‘000 % ‘000 % % % % % %Melbourne 4137.4 1.6 2143.4 74.4 40.4 1.9 17 36 28 25 39Barwon-Western District 401.6 1.2 196.7 6.8 1.6 0.8 16 44 17 30 45Central Highlands-Wimmera 211.9 1.3 105.6 3.7 4.8 4.8 17 36 17 29 46Loddon-Mallee 283.3 0.8 143.0 5.0 10.3 7.8 16 41 16 29 47Goulburn-Ovens-Murray 316.5 1.0 149.1 5.2 5.8 4.0 18 49 14 30 48All Gippsland 270.5 1.6 141.6 4.9 6.0 4.4 15 44 14 32 46Victoria 5621.2 1.5 2875.6 100.0 13.5 0.5 17 38 30 28 36Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2011. Employment data are ABS LFS Nov 2011 (state data are trend, capital city and regional figures are 12 month average). Educational attainment data forstates are ABS Survey of Education and Work 2011, state capital city and regional figures are from ABS 2006 Census (latest available)For more information see www.deewr.gov.au/lmip AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 7
  8. 8. National, state and territory labour markets QUEENSLAND Queensland is the third largest employing state, with 2.4 million workers. Regional Queensland The largest employing industries are Health Care and Social Assistance Employment is regionally dispersed with 54% of employment outside (272 600), Retail Trade (256 400) and Construction (235 400), which Brisbane. Over the year to November 2011, regional employment growth together account for almost one third of the state’s employment. was stronger than metropolitan growth (1.9% compared with 1.0% in Employment increased by 11.1% (or 234 000) over the five years to Brisbane). November 2011, compared with national growth of 10.4%. The largest The largest employing regions outside Brisbane are the Gold Coast (one in numbers of new jobs were in Health Care and Social Assistance (71 900), eight Queensland workers is employed in this region) and Mackay-Fitzroy- Mining (25 300) and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (24 500). Central West which accounts for almost one in ten (9.4%). Over the year to Employment fell in Manufacturing (down by 8700 or 4.6%). Over the year to November 2011, employment growth was strongest in Mackay-Fitzroy- November 2011, employment in Queensland rose by 0.9%, stronger than Central West (up by 5.5% or 11 500), and the Gold Coast (3.7% or 10 900). the national growth rate of 0.6%. Similar to the state as a whole, the largest employing industries in regional Queensland has a slightly higher proportion of workers who do not hold Queensland are Retail Trade (151 000), Health Care and Social Assistance post-school qualifications than the national average (39% compared with (142 800) and Construction (139 400). The largest numbers of new jobs in 37%). It also has a lower proportion of workers who hold a Bachelor degree regional areas over the year to November 2011 were in Mining (up by 11 500), or higher qualification (23% compared with 27%). Health Care and Social Assistance (9900) and Construction (7100). About 28% of workers are employed part-time (compared with 30% nationally). Regional areas have a lower proportion of people participating in the workforce (66% compared with 69% in Brisbane). Employment by Region, Nov 2011 (% of state total) Employment Change, Year to Nov 2011 (%) Population and Employment Population Employment Employment profile (% of region’s workforce) 1 year Aged Without change 1 year younger Aged 45 Bachelor Cert III/IV post- June to June Nov % of change to than 25 years or degree or or higher school 2011 2011 2011 total Nov 2011 years older higher qual VET qual qual ‘000 % ‘000 % ‘000 % % % % % % Brisbane 2029.4 1.7 1071.9 45.9 10.1 1.0 19 35 23 26 43 Sunshine Coast 335.3 1.5 158.9 6.8 4.5 2.9 16 43 15 32 44 West Moreton 84.4 2.2 39.6 1.7 1.4 3.6 12 47 9 27 56 Wide Bay-Burnett 302.9 1.3 118.8 5.1 -5.0 -4.1 17 45 11 29 51 Mackay-Fitzroy-Central West 411.5 1.8 220.2 9.4 11.5 5.5 18 34 12 29 51 Darling Downs-South West 272.4 1.3 138.6 5.9 0.4 0.3 19 41 14 26 52 Northern-North West 270.3 1.9 149.6 6.4 0.3 0.2 18 38 15 28 50 Far North 278.1 1.3 134.6 5.8 -0.4 -0.3 18 36 14 30 47 Gold Coast 596.0 1.9 303.9 13.0 10.9 3.7 16 41 15 30 46 Queensland 4580.3 1.7 2351.0 100.0 20.5 0.9 18 38 23 31 39 Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2011. Employment data are ABS LFS Nov 2011 (state data are trend, capital city and regional figures are 12 month average). Educational attainment data for states are ABS Survey of Education and Work 2011, state capital city and regional figures are from ABS 2006 Census (latest available)8 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www.deewr.gov.au/lmip
  9. 9. National, state and territory labour marketsSOUTH AUSTRALIASouth Australia is the second smallest employing state, with 7% of the Regional South Australianation’s employment (820 900). The largest employing industries are Employment is highly concentrated in Adelaide which employs almost threeHealth Care and Social Assistance (102 200), Retail Trade (92 500) and in every four of the state’s workers. Outside the state capital city there areManufacturing (78 800). Combined, these industries employ one in every two labour force regions. They differ markedly in terms of both geographicthree workers in the state. area and employment size. Southern and Eastern SA accounts for 16.9%Employment increased by 6.9% (or 53 000) over the five years to of state employment and Northern and Western SA, which covers a muchNovember 2011, a lower growth rate than the national average of 10.4%. larger area, accounts for 9.2%. Over the year to November 2011, bothEmployment rose in 12 of the 19 industries, with the largest numbers of regions recorded employment growth, with Southern and Eastern SA upnew jobs being in Construction (17 200), Accommodation and Food by 1.4% and Northern and Western SA by 3.9%.Services (12 500) and Professional, Scientific and Technical Services The largest employing industries in regional South Australia are Agriculture,(11 000). Over the year to November 2011, employment grew more Forestry and Fishing (31 400), Manufacturing (23 100) and Retail Tradestrongly than the national rate, up by 0.8% compared with 0.6%. (21 500). Over the year to November 2011, the largest numbers of newSouth Australia has a slightly lower proportion of workers who hold jobs in regional South Australia were in Accommodation and Food Servicespost-school qualifications than the national average (58% compared (up by 2400) and Administrative and Support Services (1900).with 61%), and a lower proportion holding a Bachelor degree or higher The participation rate in regional areas is much the same as that inqualification (23% compared with 27%). Adelaide (63% compared with 64%).South Australia’s workforce has a relatively old age profile, with 41% ofworkers aged 45 years or older compared with 38% nationally. It also hasa slightly higher proportion of its workers employed part-time than thenational average (34% compared with 30%). The proportion of femaleworkers is the same as the national average (46%).Employment by Region, Nov 2011 (% of state total) Employment Change, Year to Nov 2011 (%)Population and Employment Population Employment Employment profile (% of region’s workforce) 1 year Aged Without change 1 year younger Aged 45 Bachelor Cert III/IV post- June to June Nov % of change to than 25 years or degree or or higher school 2011 2011 2011 total Nov 2011 years older higher qual VET qual qual ‘000 % ‘000 % ‘000 % % % % % %Adelaide 1213.0 0.9 605.7 73.9 5.6 0.9 18 39 21 27 44Southern and Eastern SA 278.8 0.7 138.8 16.9 2.0 1.4 14 47 11 28 52Northern and Western SA 164.5 0.1 75.3 9.2 2.8 3.9 16 43 11 27 53South Australia 1656.3 0.8 820.9 100.0 6.5 0.8 17 41 23 29 41Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2011. Employment data are ABS LFS Nov 2011 (state data are trend, capital city and regional figures are 12 month average). Educational attainment data forstates are ABS Survey of Education and Work 2011, state capital city and regional figures are from ABS 2006 Census (latest available)For more information see www.deewr.gov.au/lmip AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 9
  10. 10. National, state and territory labour markets WESTERN AUSTRALIA Western Australia is the fourth largest employing state, with around one in Regional Western Australia ten Australian workers (1.2 million). The largest employing industries are Employment is highly concentrated in Perth which accounts for three Construction (130 800), Retail Trade (129 100) and Health Care and Social quarters of the state’s employment. In regional Western Australia, Assistance (127 800). Together, these industries account for 31% of the employment is spread fairly evenly across the two regions, Lower Western state’s jobs. WA and Remainder-Balance WA, although these regions have markedly Employment increased by 13.9% (or 151 200) over the five years to different geographic size. November 2011, outstripping the national growth rate of 10.4%. Over the year to November 2011, most new jobs in regional areas were Employment rose in 15 of the 19 industries. The largest numbers of new created in Lower Western WA (up by 6400 or 4.0%). jobs were in Mining (40 300), Health Care and Social Assistance (25 100) and Construction (20 000). Over the year to November 2011, employment The largest numbers of new jobs in regional areas over the year to increased by 1.2% compared with national growth of 0.6%. November 2011 were in Mining (up by 5600), Health Care and Social Assistance (3800) and Retail Trade (3100). About 41% of workers in Western Australia do not hold post-school qualifications, slightly higher than the national average (37%). A lower Regional areas have a slightly lower proportion of people participating proportion of workers in Western Australia hold a Bachelor degree or higher in the workforce (67%) compared with Perth (69%). qualification than the national average (22% compared with 27%). A slightly lower proportion of the state’s workforce is female compared with the national average (44% compared with 46%). The workforce profile is similar, though, to the national average in terms of full-time employment (71% of workers are employed full-time compared with 70% nationally), and the proportion of workers aged 45 years or older (38%, the same as the national figure). Employment by Region, Nov 2011 (% of state total) Employment Change, Year to Nov 2011 (%) Population and Employment Population Employment Employment profile (% of region’s workforce) 1 year Aged Without change 1 year younger Aged 45 Bachelor Cert III/IV post- June to June Nov % of change to than 25 years or degree or or higher school 2011 2011 2011 total Nov 2011 years older higher qual VET qual qual ‘000 % ‘000 % ‘000 % % % % % % Perth 1738.8 2.5 922.7 74.8 15.0 1.7 18 37 22 28 42 Lower Western WA 340.3 2.5 166.4 13.5 6.4 4.0 15 40 12 29 49 Remainder - Balance WA 270.2 1.8 144.3 11.7 2.0 1.4 15 44 12 29 50 Western Australia 2349.3 2.4 1238.7 100.0 14.6 1.2 17 38 22 30 41 Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2011. Employment data are ABS LFS Nov 2011 (state data are trend, capital city and regional figures are 12 month average). Educational attainment data for states are ABS Survey of Education and Work, 2011, state capital city and regional figures are from ABS 2006 Census (latest available)10 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www.deewr.gov.au/lmip
  11. 11. National, state and territory labour marketsTASMANIATasmania is the smallest employing state, with 2% of the nation’s Regional Tasmaniaemployment (237 600). The largest employing industries are Health Care Tasmania has the most regionally diverse workforce in Australia withand Social Assistance (30 600), Retail Trade (26 800) and Construction around 56% of employment located outside Hobart. Regional employment(21 100), which together account for one third of the state’s employment. is concentrated in Mersey-Lyell and Northern which combined account forOver the five years to November 2011, Tasmania’s employment increased half of the state’s workers. Over the year to November 2011, employmentby 6.1% (or 13 700) compared with national growth of 10.4%. Twelve of the fell slightly in regional Tasmania, down by 0.3%, but employment rose in19 industries increased their employment, with the largest numbers of new Northern (up by 0.3%) and Mersey-Lyell (0.2%).jobs created in Construction (4800), Health Care and Social Assistance In regional Tasmania, the largest employing industries are Health Care and(3900) and Education and Training (3500). Over the year to November Social Assistance (17 100), Retail Trade (14 600) and Construction (13 300).2011, the level of employment was unchanged, compared with growth The largest numbers of new regional jobs over the year to November 2011of 0.6% at the national level. were created in Construction (2200) and Accommodation and FoodTasmania has a higher proportion of workers who do not hold post-school Services (1500).qualifications than the national average (41% compared with 37%) and a There is only a slight difference in the proportion of people participating inlower proportion of workers hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification the workforce between regional areas of Tasmania (60%) and Hobart (62%).(22% compared with 27% nationally).The Tasmanian workforce has a particularly old age profile, with 43% ofworkers aged 45 years or older, the highest of any state or territory. It alsohas a higher proportion of its workers employed part-time than the nationalaverage (35% compared with 30%).Employment by Region, Nov 2011 (% of state total) Employment Change, Year to Nov 2011 (%)Population and Employment Population Employment Employment profile (% of region’s workforce) 1 year Aged Without change 1 year younger Aged 45 Bachelor Cert III/IV post- June to June Nov % of change to than 25 years or degree or or higher school 2011 2011 2011 total Nov 2011 years older higher qual VET qual qual ‘000 % ‘000 % ‘000 % % % % % %Hobart 216.7 1.0 103.9 43.7 1.9 1.8 17 42 22 27 43Southern 38.1 0.8 15.6 6.6 -0.7 -4.1 13 57 12 28 50Northern 142.8 0.4 68.6 28.8 0.2 0.3 18 41 15 28 48Mersey-Lyell 112.9 0.2 49.7 20.9 0.1 0.2 16 42 11 30 50Tasmania 510.5 0.6 237.6 100.0 -0.1 0.0 17 43 22 31 41Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2011. Employment data are ABS LFS Nov 2011 (state data are trend, capital city and regional figures are 12 month average). Educational attainment data forstates are ABS Survey of Education and Work, 2011, state capital city and regional figures are from ABS 2006 Census (latest available)For more information see www.deewr.gov.au/lmip AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 11
  12. 12. National, state and territory labour markets NORTHERN TERRITORY AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY Population Population June 2011 (‘000) 230.4 June 2011 (‘000) 365.6 1 year change to June 2011 (%) 0.4 1 year change to June 2011 (%) 1.9 Employment Employment November 2011 (‘000) 123.7 November 2011 (‘000) 204.2 1 year change to Nov 2011 (‘000) 1.2 1 year change to Nov 2011 (‘000) -1.0 1 year change to Nov 2011 (%) 1.0 1 year change to Nov 2011 (%) -0.5 Aged younger than 25 years (%) 16 Aged younger than 25 years (%) 17 Aged 45 years or older (%) 37 Aged 45 years or older (%) 36 Educational profile (% of NT workforce) Educational profile (% of ACT workforce) Bachelor degree or higher qualification (%) 24 Bachelor degree or higher qualification (%) 44 With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) 28 With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) 22 Without post-school qualifications (%) 43 Without post-school qualifications (%) 29 Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2011. ABS LFS Nov 2011, trend. ABS Survey of Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2011. ABS LFS Nov 2011, trend. ABS Survey Education and Work, 2011 of Education and Work, 2011 The Northern Territory has Australia’s smallest labour market, with 1% of The Australian Capital Territory (ACT) accounts for slightly less than 2% of national employment (123 700). However, the proportion of people national employment (204 200). The largest employing industries are Public participating in the workforce is higher than in any state, and equal to the Administration and Safety (62 800), Professional, Scientific and Technical Australian Capital Territory (73% compared with 66% nationally). Services (19 000) and Health Care and Social Assistance (18 400), which collectively account for almost half of the workforce. Employment increased strongly over the five years to November 2011, up by 18.2% (or 19 000), compared with national growth of 10.4%. Growth was Employment increased by 4.9% (or 9600) over the five years to November relatively strong over the year to November 2011, rising by 1.0% compared 2011, compared with national growth of 10.4%. The largest gains were in with national growth of 0.6%. Public Administration and Safety (up by 8300), Construction (2900) and Health Care and Social Assistance (2700). Over the year to November 2011, The largest employing industries in the Northern Territory are Public employment fell by 0.5% compared with national growth of 0.6%. Administration and Safety (18 300), Health Care and Social Assistance (13 200) and Construction (12 200), which together account for slightly The workforce is highly skilled with 69% of workers holding a post-school more than one third of the Territory’s employment. Over the five years to qualification compared with 61% nationally. A high proportion of workers November 2011, the largest numbers of new jobs were in Construction (up hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification (44% compared with the by 3900), Education and Training and Public Administration and Safety (each national average of 27%), but a relatively small proportion hold Certificate III up by 2700). or higher vocational education and training qualifications (22% compared with 29% nationally). This reflects the concentration of the ACT’s The workforce has a relatively low skill profile. About 43% of workers do not employment in industries which generally require university qualifications hold post-school qualifications compared with 37% nationally. and the relatively small proportion in Manufacturing and Construction. About 47% of workers are female and just 18% of Territory workers are The proportion of people participating in the workforce is higher in the ACT employed part-time (compared with 30% nationally). than the national average (73% compared with 66%). A lower proportion of the workforce is employed part-time than the national average (25% compared with 30%) and a smaller proportion of workers are aged 45 years or older (36% compared with 38%). Employment Change, Year to Nov 2011 (%)12 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www.deewr.gov.au/lmip
  13. 13. IndustriesINDUSTRY OVERVIEWWhich are the largest employing Where are the new jobs?industries? Over the five years to November 2011, around 1.1 million jobs were created.There are 19 broad industries in Australia. In employment terms, the largest The largest growth was inare Health Care and Social Assistance, Retail Trade and Construction which • Health Care and Social Assistance (up by 276 000)each employ more than 1 million workers. Manufacturing is also a large • Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (122 300)employer, with almost 950 000. These four industries combined, employ • Education and Training (114 700)two in every five Australian workers. • Mining (102 900)It is interesting that, although the Mining industry experienced the largest • Construction (100 700).percentage rise in employment over the five years to November 2011(75.5%), it had only the fourth largest number of new jobs and accounts for Which industries had declining2% of national employment. employment?Over the five years to November 2011, employment fell in Manufacturing, but Employment declined in four industries over the five years to Novemberthere are still more people employed in Manufacturing than there are in the 2011, inArts and Recreation Services; Information Media and Telecommunications; • Manufacturing (down by 72 100)Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services; and Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste • Information Media and Telecommunications (46 800)Services industries combined. The decline in Manufacturing is part of a • Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing (25 400)long-term trend reflecting structural adjustment in the Australian economy • Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services (2600).(information about structural adjustment is provided on page 14).Many industries, such as Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing; Mining; and Which industries have the most jobsManufacturing create thousands of jobs in other industries, such as in regional locations?Transport, Postal and Warehousing; Professional, Scientific and Technical Although Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing has the highest proportion of itsServices; and Construction. employment in regional areas (87%), followed by Mining (61%), the largest numbers of jobs in regional Australia are in • Health Care and Social Assistance (almost half a million) • Retail Trade (more than 470 000) • Construction (around 407 000).Industry Employment Projected Employment profile (% of growth to Employment Nov 2011 industry’s workforce) 2016-17 5 year Outside Aged 45 % of change state Working years orIndustry workforce to Nov 2011 capital part-time Female older ‘000 % ‘000 % % % % % ‘000 %Accommodation and Food Services 773.4 7 85.5 12.4 39 57 56 22 30.9 4.0Administrative and Support Services 399.7 3 45.4 12.8 35 40 52 41 17.7 4.4Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 327.1 3 -25.4 -7.2 87 27 30 56 5.5 1.7Arts and Recreation Services 213.4 2 35.3 19.8 34 44 47 33 7.8 3.7Construction 1045.5 9 100.7 10.7 39 14 11 33 131.2 12.6Education and Training 859.2 7 114.7 15.4 36 38 69 49 61.3 7.1Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 154.4 1 48.4 45.7 44 9 25 43 17.9 11.6Financial and Insurance Services 432.1 4 30.3 7.5 20 18 53 31 18.5 4.3Health Care and Social Assistance 1343.4 12 276.0 25.9 37 43 79 47 241.8 18.0Information Media and Telecommunications 203.7 2 -46.8 -18.7 21 19 42 31 4.6 2.3Manufacturing 945.6 8 -72.1 -7.1 35 14 26 41 -85.6 -9.0Mining 239.1 2 102.9 75.5 61 3 16 34 103.7 43.4Other Services 452.7 4 38.3 9.2 38 29 41 37 18.4 4.1Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 865.7 8 122.3 16.5 24 22 43 36 108.2 12.5Public Administration and Safety 738.1 6 98.4 15.4 43 17 47 45 31.2 4.2Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 193.8 2 -2.6 -1.3 33 26 50 39 6.7 3.5Retail Trade 1219.1 11 34.6 2.9 39 48 56 28 50.4 4.1Transport, Postal and Warehousing 580.1 5 68.4 13.4 33 19 22 48 42.0 7.2Wholesale Trade 424.7 4 15.8 3.9 28 16 33 42 17.0 4.0Total (all industries) 11 456.5 100 1077.4 10.4 37 30 46 38 829.3 7.2Sources: ABS Labour Force Survey, DEEWR trend and four quarter average data. DEEWR employment projectionsFor more information see www.skillsinfo.gov.au AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 13

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