Grandmother Bruin’s Teeth

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All the children gathered around the campfire, ready for story time. Old Grandmother Bruin was filled with exciting stories about Indian warriors, Mongol warlords, African kings, and wild western cowboys.

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Grandmother Bruin’s Teeth

  1. 1. Grandmother Bruin’s Teeth All the children gathered around the campfire, ready for story time. Old Grandmother Bruin was filled with exciting stories about Indian warriors, Mongol warlords, African kings, and wild western cowboys. They all wondered what the story would be about tonight. Story Time “This is the story of a young girl from Alaska who thought she was a bear; she was a strong, brave, and fearsome creature that everyone both respected and feared. She did all the things that bears would do. She climbed trees, chased away small animals, ate honey, and roared at her enemies. Her favorite weapon was her teeth. She would open cabinet doors with her teeth in search of honey. She would carry around blankets, pillows and bags of food with her teeth to prepare her den for hibernation. She woul d snap her jaws at her brothers (the wolves) when they would try to steal her food.” “The bear-girl enjoyed her adventures very much, but soon her parents made her stop being a bear and start being a young woman. She did stop, but she still loved honey and liked to do things with her teeth. She would rip open bags with her teeth, chew on pencils, open bottles with her teeth, and on occasion she would still gnash her teeth when she was angry.” One of the children looked up from the enchanting flames of the fire. “Grandma! I saw you do that at daddy one time when he left the smoke in the beehives too long last week!” Grandmother Bruin chuckled and continued. “As this young woman grew up, she started having trouble with her teeth. Her precious bear jaws were just not as strong as they used to be. Some of her teeth started to chip when she tried to open bottles. Others got cavities because she ate too much honey. As this poor bear-girl grew older and older, she began losing all her teeth!” The children gasped. “All her teeth?” one child exclaimed. “Yes, all her teeth,” grandma affirmed solemnly. “Eewwww! How did she eat?” another grandchild asked.
  2. 2. “She had to get fake teeth. She had to put them in in the morning and take them out at night. It was awful for this grownup bear-woman to have to do that. She made sure her children brushed their teeth well and didn’t bite on hard things. She began working for Dentist McPherson, Dentist Salina KS, Dentist Hutchinson KS, and Dentist Newton KS, teaching children not to bite on pencils, chew ice, eat sticky candy, or gnash their teeth. All these things will make your teeth go away.” “I will never do that!” cried one young girl, followed by a chorus of other small voices. “Good,” said grandmother. “That is the lesson we can learn from the old bear lady. Now off to bed, and make sure to brush well!” The children scurried off and Grandmother Bruin retired to her bedroom. She smiled at herself in the mirror, popped out her dentures and slipped into her den. Photo Credit: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/, http://blogs.egu.eu/

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