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Competing in Ecosystems

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Competing in ecosystems through triple-loop learning: Working in relation to what is going on below-the-surface and its ‘beyond’

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Competing in Ecosystems

  1. 1. Competing in Ecosystems: working in relation to what is going on below-the-surface and its ‘beyond’ Dr Philip Boxer BSc MBA PhD 1Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  2. 2. PART I – WHAT IS THE PROBLEM? Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 2
  3. 3. Competing within an ecosystem The impact of tempo The Inpatients of the Ward Service suppliers to The Ward The Ward Hospital ecosystem Demand tempo: The rate at which new forms of demand need to be satisfactorily addressed Service supplier 1 Service supplier 2 sub-contract sub-contract Acquisition tempo: The rate at which new requirements for component services can be met The Ward users orchestration synchronization Alignment tempo: The rate at which the Ward is able to align new care pathways to new demands from patients users The demands of inpatients’ conditions arise within the context of patients’ lives The Ward aligns its treatments to the demands of its inpatients’ conditions The supplier responds to its users within the Ward Demand Tempo Alignment Tempo Acquisition Tempo Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 3
  4. 4. Economic Entity Task System Economic Entity Task System contract transaction A singular socio- technical system Leadership of the socio- technical system The socio-technical entity The ‘open system’ metaphor Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 4
  5. 5. ‘Design-time’ and ‘Run-time’1 If the tempos are such that the three spaces can be dis-entangled: Service Supplier Space Operational Space Acquisition Space The Ward Ward’s inpatients New or modified service is developed Functional and non- Functional requirements defined for changes to services 1. The concierge service decides what the Ward needs to reduce time spent managing services 2. Sponsoring process shapes what is developed 3. Service supplier delivers to the Ward customer Governance of Hospital Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 5
  6. 6. Service Supplier’s organisation is defined by its primary task Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 6 layer 1: Machine Level Interactions (lexis) layer 2: Syntactic Interactions (language syntax) layer 3: Semantic Interactions (shared understanding of meaning) layer 4: Discursive Interactions (shared understanding of organizational processes) layer 0: Supporting Substrate The shared understanding of the organisation as a whole is in terms of its overall primary task supported behaviours
  7. 7. ‘Design-time’ and ‘Run-time’2 If the tempos are such that the three spaces are unavoidably entangled Service Supplier Space Operational Space Acquisition Space The Ward Ward’s inpatients New or modified service is developed Functional and non-Functional requirements defined for changes to services Demand tempo: the tempo at which the organization of inpatients’ demands changes in relation to the Ward. Supplier tempo: the tempo at which the supplier is able to supply new components Alignment tempo: the tempo at which the operating model and supplied components can be aligned to enable the Ward to meet the demands of its patients Governance of Hospital Horizontal approach to governance: There have to be processes of dynamic alignment because the tempos are such that the three spaces are entangled Under these conditions, the processes of (dynamic) alignment have to be understood as taking place within a (larger) socio- technical ecosystem Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 7
  8. 8. Boundary An economic entity establishing a relation of accountability and control over its task systems within the boundary of the Services entity Task systemsTask systemsTask systemsTask systems Service Primary Task Services ‘Provider’ Ward ‘Purchaser’ Alignment of service to context-of-use particular to the Ward ‘purchaser’ control accountability Service Outcome processes-of-organizing Ward Sister’s Leadership Primary risk The mis-alignment of the service outcome to the context-of-use Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 8
  9. 9. Primary Risk brings in its relation to its ecosystem Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 9 layer 1: Machine Level Interactions (lexis) layer 2: Syntactic Interactions (language syntax) layer 3: Semantic Interactions (shared understanding of meaning) layer 4: Discursive Interactions (shared understanding of organizational processes) layer 5: Pragmatic Interactions (the way the situation is engaged with) layer 6: Context-of-use (the context in which the effect is experienced) layer 0: Supporting Substrate layer 7: Overall Context (the overall context giving rise to the contexts-of-use) Primary risk defined by potential mis-alignment to a dynamic context-of-use supported behaviours possible alignments
  10. 10. The Complex Strengthening horizontal linkages push organizations into the ‘complex’ space 10 Complex ecosystem Horizontal cause-and-effect linkages strong weak Vertical control linkages weak strong Complicated system-of- systems Simple system Chaotic behaviour Source: “The new dynamics of strategy: Sense-making in a complex and complicated World”. Kurtz and Snowden. IBM Systems Journal Vol 42, No 3 2003 disorder Cause-and-effect separated over time and space – an expert would be expected to know the right answer Cause-and-effect relations repeatable, perceivable and predictable – everyone knows the right answer Cause-and-effect are only coherent in retrospect and do not repeat – the right answer only emerges retrospectively No cause-and-effect relationships perceivable – there is no right answer Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  11. 11. Triple-loop Agency To act ‘strategically’ in complex environments involves modulating identity 11 Project identity interaction environment Project identity interaction environment interaction Double-loop Agency: identity defines norms of adaptivity – different mode of interaction in different environment to sustain given direct effects Project identity interaction environment Triple-loop Agency: identity derived from norms of effect - different mode of interaction in any given environment to sustain given indirect effects Single-loop Agency: identity defines norms of interaction – one mode of interaction in any one environment modulation of interaction modulation of identityA B C interaction interaction Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  12. 12. Triple-loop learning Modulating identity involves being affected by the experience-in-its-context 12 Concrete Experience (doing / having an experience) Reflective Observation (reviewing & reflecting on the experience) Abstract Conceptualisation (concluding learning from the experience) Active Experimentation (planning & trying out what you have learned) 1-loop 2-loop 3-loop Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  13. 13. The challenge of triple loop learning Triple loop learning involves attending to ‘situation’ in a different way “Discussion of the subject of relating is a much easier exercise for analysts than is the discussion of usage, since relating may be examined as a phenomenon of the subject, and psychoanalysis always likes to be able to eliminate all factors that are environmental, except in so far as the environment can be thought of in terms of projective mechanisms. But in examining usage there is no escape: the analyst must take into account the nature of the object, not as a projection, but as a thing in itself.” (Winnicott 1969) • Both individuals and enterprises have difficulty adapting to the dynamic impact of changes in the way their environment is organized. • Managing the risks of adaptation* means managing the adaptation of identity • The situational cues/clues about this adaptation are in ‘affective networks’ and the nature of Freud’s third identification Winnicott, D. W. (1969). "The use of an object." International Journal of Psychoanalysis 50: 711-716. 13Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 * i.e. risks of making errors of execution, planning & intention
  14. 14. What is the Problem? What makes acting ‘strategically’ difficult in complex environments? 1. The existing assumptions about – open systems, – primary task, – organization-as-defence-against-anxiety/organization-in-the-mind and – basic assumption-working-below-the-surface are perfectly suited to understanding the contexts in which professional coaching and counselling to individuals-in-roles are carried out. 2. These assumptions take the existence of the sovereign (i.e. self-defining) client enterprise as ontically prior (i.e. a given context) to the problematics of working with individuals-in-roles. 3. When dealing with the horizontally-networked organization-without-boundaries, this ontically prior status of the client enterprise can no longer be assumed. This makes the problematics ‘wicked’ i.e. it creates a circular causality between role and context. 4. The thinking in this presentation aims to develop the additional assumptions needed to work with the individual in these more complex environments. Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 14 ‘wicked’ from Rittel, H. W., & Webber, M. M. (1973). Dilemmas in a General Theory of Planning. Policy Sciences 4, 155-169.
  15. 15. What does this imply? What further assumptions are needed to act ‘strategically’ in complex environments? 1. Further assumptions need to be made about: – complex sociotechnical ecosystems – primary risk; domain of relevance – The third dilemma: affiliation vs alliance (top-down vs bottom-up & espoused-theory vs unthought-known being the first two) – what-is-Really-going on (wiRgo) in complex environments. These assumptions impact on the assumptions made about the individual’s relation to the unconscious. 2. A ‘gendered’ understanding of the relation between the organization and its environment becomes necessary (i.e. one that addresses the problematics of the subject’s double subjection as a divided subject – and its valencies). . 3. A move has to be made from a one-sided to a multi-sided understanding of demand, with a corresponding primacy given to indirect over direct effects and benefits. . 4. All of this presents the individual with too-many-things-to-have-to-attend-to. How, then, is the individual to act ‘strategically’? Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 15
  16. 16. The argument It is necessary to identify extimate symptoms of what-is-Really-going-on (wiRgo) • Sovereignty (with its authority) is the assertion of a particular way of anticipating meaning • The unconscious is organized as chains of displacement structured in relation to each other on the basis of difference like language is structured by difference • The Freudian drive is the experience of structural ‘gaps’ in relation to these chains • wiRgo is experienced indirectly as what-is-left-out in the way these ‘gaps’ are experienced. • The third (type of) identification can take the subject ‘beyond’ their existing knowing into affective/heretical networks. • Forensic processes* are needed to distinguish the symptoms arising from the third (type of) identification that are strategic from those that are ‘merely’ distracting. 16 * Forensic processes – critical processes capable of examining the existent ontic frameworks in relation to which symptoms are constituted. Two types of mutually supporting framework are used: • Structural – the formation of the organisational environments in which dynamics are played out • Relational – the patterns of relationship constituting organisation dynamics Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  17. 17. PART II – THE ARGUMENT Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 17
  18. 18. Outline The relevance of the relation to the unconscious • The ‘id’ knows more than the ‘ego’ admits • The Freudian Unconscious • Freud’s first model • Three forms of identification • The Freudian drive as relation to ‘gap’ in the primary repressed • The Lacanian twist 18Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  19. 19. THE ‘ID’ KNOWS MORE THAN THE ‘EGO’ ADMITS Source for this and the next section: Mark Solms and Jaak Panksepp (2012) The “Id” Knows More than the “Ego” Admits: Neuropsychoanalytic and Primal Consciousness Perspectives on the Interface Between Affective and Cognitive Neuroscience. Brain Sci. 2012, 2, 147-175; doi:10.3390/brainsci2020147 19Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  20. 20. motor association (executive) cortex motor projection cortex perceptual association cortex exteroceptive projection cortex exteroceptive projection cortex some interoceptive nuclei some ERTAS (arousal) nuclei some basic emotion circuits BrainMind structures 20 Cortical processes… … rest on nested layers of process Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  21. 21. Primary-Process Emotions Affects Deeply Subcortical Secondary-Process Learning Largely Upper Limbic Tertiary-Process Cognitions Largely Neocortical Bottom-up Influences on Ruminations and Thoughts Bottom-up Learning and Development SEEKING, RAGE, FEAR, LUST, CARE, PANIC/GRIEF & PLAY Top-down Cognitive Regulation Top-down Conditioned Responses Two-way or ‘Circular’ Causation in nested BrainMind structures declarative thinking 21Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  22. 22. Primary-Process Emotions Affects Deeply Subcortical Secondary-Process Learning Largely Upper Limbic Tertiary-Process Cognitions Largely Neocortical Bottom-up Influences on Ruminations and Thoughts Bottom-up Learning and Development SEEKING, RAGE, FEAR, LUST, CARE, PANIC/GRIEF & PLAY Top-down Cognitive Regulation Top-down Conditioned Responses Anoetic 1st-person perspective/core self upper brainstem up to septal area Noetic 2nd-person perspective/bodily self lower subcortical ganglia and upper limbic structures Autonoetic 3rd-person perspective/everyday self higher neocortical functions the subjective or phenomenal level of the anoetic self as affect the perceptual or representational level of the noetic self as an object, no different from other objects the conceptual or re-representational level of the autonoetic self in relation to other objects, i.e., perceived from an external perspective Nested Selves the anoetic self is the medium in which we experience our consciousness 22Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 ‘I’ ego id
  23. 23. Primary-Process Emotions: Affects Deeply Subcortical Secondary-Process Learning: Largely Upper Limbic Tertiary-Process Cognitions: Largely Neocortical Bottom-up Influences on Ruminations and Thoughts Bottom-up Learning and Development SEEKING, RAGE, FEAR, LUST, CARE, PANIC/ GRIEF & PLAY Top-down Cognitive Regulation Top-down Conditioned Responses 1st Attention (autonoetic) 2nd Attention (noetic) inner face of 2nd attention outer face of 2nd attention inner face of 1st attention outer face of 1st attention below-the-surface (anoetic) The below-the-surface More is ‘known’ below-the-surface than the 1st and (outer-facing) 2nd attentions admit 23Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 dynamically unconscious radically unconscious ‘I’ ego id
  24. 24. THE FREUDIAN UNCONSCIOUS AND THE DIVIDED SUBJECT 24Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  25. 25. sound-image motor-image reading-image writing-image Word-presentation ω-system visual tactile acoustic Thing-presentation ψ-complex Open complex of thing-associations Closed complex Page 214 Vol IV Freud’s First Model 25 Secondary-Process Primary-Process Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  26. 26. . . . . . . . . Ucs PcsPcpt Mnem Mnem’ M Motor system [also known as Consciousness system, abbreviated Cs (previously ω)] Perceptual system (previously φ) Preconscious System Unconscious System Mnemic systems (previously ψ) Freud’s second model 26Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  27. 27. preconscious unconscious pcpt-cs Freud’s final model 27Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  28. 28. Motor system [also known as Consciousness system, abbreviated Cs (previously ω)] Perceptual system (previously φ) Preconscious System Unconscious System Mnemic systems (previously ψ) . . . . . . . . Ucs PcsPcpt Mnem Mnem’ M Correspondences between Freud’s second and last models 28Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  29. 29. Primary-Process Emotions: Affects Deeply Subcortical Secondary-Process Learning: Largely Upper Limbic Tertiary-Process Cognitions: Largely Neocortical Bottom-up Influences on Ruminations and Thoughts Bottom-up Learning and Development SEEKING, RAGE, FEAR, LUST, CARE, PANIC/ GRIEF & PLAY Top-down Cognitive Regulation Top-down Conditioned Responses 1st Attention (autonoetic) 2nd Attention (noetic) inner face of 2nd attention outer face of 2nd attention ‘I’ ego id inner face of 1st attention outer face of 1st attention Freud and Neuroscience Distinguishing the subjects of perception and of the unconscious below-the-surface (anoetic) 29Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 dynamically unconscious radically unconscious
  30. 30. Primary-Process Emotions: Affects Deeply Subcortical Secondary-Process Learning: Largely Upper Limbic Tertiary-Process Cognitions: Largely Neocortical Bottom-up Influences on Ruminations and Thoughts Bottom-up Learning and Development SEEKING, RAGE, FEAR, LUST, CARE, PANIC/ GRIEF & PLAY Top-down Cognitive Regulation Top-down Conditioned Responses 1st Attention (autonoetic) 2nd Attention (noetic) inner face of 2nd attention outer face of 2nd attention the subject of the unconscious the subject of perception inner face of 1st attention outer face of 1st attention The Divided Subject $ the ego is divided in its attempt to know itself below-the-surface (anoetic) 30Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  31. 31. RETURNING TO FREUD’S FIRST MODEL Understanding “subject of the unconscious” in terms of Freud’s Project for a Scientific Psychology 31Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  32. 32. Complexification How is experience complexified? • The networks of relationships in which I am embedded provide a metaphor for complexification people x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x X x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 32 Experience 1 Experience 2 Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  33. 33. Quantity and Quality1 Open: complexification of difference Drive energies aka ‘quotas of affect’ Distribution of ‘quotas of affect’ Closed: difference between qualities Open: complexification across different neuronal pathways 33 Perceptual/ Motor systems Primary-Process Primary-Process Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 -system -complex -system Distribution of Q Q Q-screen attention facilitation -complex -system Distribution of Q Q Q-screen facilitation
  34. 34. Primary-Process Emotions: Affects Deeply Subcortical Secondary-Process Learning: Largely Upper Limbic Tertiary-Process Cognitions: Largely Neocortical Bottom-up Influences on Ruminations and Thoughts Bottom-up Learning and Development SEEKING, RAGE, FEAR, LUST, CARE, PANIC/ GRIEF & PLAY Top-down Cognitive Regulation Top-down Conditioned Responses 1st Attention (autonoetic) 2nd Attention (noetic) inner face of 2nd attention outer face of 2nd attention the subject of the unconscious the subject of perception ‘I’ ego id inner face of 1st attention outer face of 1st attention Drive energies aka ‘quotas of affect’ ψ system below-the-surface (anoetic) Quantity and Quality2 34Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013  system
  35. 35. The -complex structures like a language does Complexification is a process of displacement/metonymy • ‘Meaning’ is in difference between patterns of complexification people x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x X x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x The experience is ‘complexified’ as a pattern of relationships across the nodes 35 Experience 1 Experience 2 The ‘meaning’ is in the difference Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  36. 36. Primary repression the unconscious is structured like a language is structured “Thus, if man comes to think about the symbolic order, it is because he is first caught in it in his being. The illusion that he has formed this order through his consciousness stems from the fact that it is through the pathway of a specific gap in his imaginary relationship with his semblable that he has been able to enter into this order as a subject. But he has only been able to make this entrance by passing through the radical defile of speech…” Écrits p53 • Experience without signification is traumatic/pre-conceptual trauma. • With or without signification, there will always be ‘gaps’ between the pathways inscribed in the unconscious by experience. • The experience of these ‘gaps’ is referred to as ‘what-is-Really-going-on’ (wiRgo). 36 ψ-complex thing-presentation as primary process ground-of-being (ego) a (Id) S a’ other A Other Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 Rooted in an originating affirmation (Bejahung) constituting the unary trait
  37. 37. THE SIGNIFIER/SIGNIFIED RELATION AND THE ‘GAP’ 37Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  38. 38. The cat lay on the mat . signifier signified Tree identity identification correspondence within implicit difference correspondence to an explicit difference correspondence to patterns in relations between differences (i) (ii) (iii) The signifier-signified relation 38 (iv) S - signifier s - signified metonymy – ‘sliding’ of the relation Metaphor – ‘fixing’ of the relation We will want to further distinguish between identification arising from ‘fixing’ of relation and identification arising in the course of ‘sliding’ of the relation Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  39. 39. Freud’s three forms of identification • Freud’s three forms of identification: – identifying with someone, in the sense of wanting to be them themselves - “I want to be you”. (perceptual object - ‘identity’) – identifying with someone in the sense of wanting to have that person’s way of organizing the way they are - “I want to learn how to be like you”. (thinking object – ‘fixing of identification’) – identifying not with someone, but rather with a situation that engenders a particular affective relation to themselves. (affective object – ‘sliding of identification’) • “Supposing, for instance, that one of the girls in a boarding school has had a letter from someone with whom she is secretly in love which arouses her jealousy, and that she reacts to with a fit of hysterics; then some of her friends who know about it will catch the fit, as we say, by mental infection. The mechanism is that of identification based upon the possibility or desire of putting oneself in the same situation.” (Freud 1921c) p107 – my emphasis. Freud, S. (1921c). Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego. The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud. J. Strachey. London, The Hogarth Press and the Institute of Psycho-Analysis. 18: 65-143. 39Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  40. 40. Displacement & Condensation: metonymy and metaphor 40 metaphor metonymy Open: complexification of difference Closed: quality Relating as if it has meaning That which is immediately recognizableThat which can be made sense of through the way the signifiers are organized Meaning (signified) Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  41. 41. … the Punctuationner elicits this parti what has been heard Diachronic axis (through time) Synchronic axis (in relation to a moment in time) paradigmatics syntagmatics listening Within the context of all the meaningful distinctions that could be made… … the listener elicits this particular punctuation of what has been heard Meaning (signified) Speaking (signifiers) Treating the speaking as if something is meant – anticipating meaning Through identification, the signified is taken as ‘supporting’ the punctuated relation to the signifiers Making meaning 41Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  42. 42. First and second identifications listening Imaginary identification: immediate recognition Speaking (signifiers) (moi) i(a) I(A) $ Symbolic identification: working-it-out recognition 42Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  43. 43. Speaking (signifiers) S <> a desire The subject as something that is always more than can be signified The objet petit a as relation to something that is wanting/lacking The relation to what is left wanting – phantasy as valency to way of minding the gap: recognition in the relation to the situation Third identification – phantasy as valency to minding the ‘gap’ 43Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 I(A) $ phantasy (moi) i(a)
  44. 44. Underlying this valency is the relation to the lost object and to the drive Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 44 The graph of desire from Lacan’s Écrits desire Phantasy  valency Drive S◊DS(A) As(A) ego/moi i(a) I(A) $ Signifier of the lack of the Other  relation to the lost object/das Ding divided subject  doubly subjected
  45. 45. THE FREUDIAN DRIVE AS THE RELATION TO THIS ‘GAP’ 45Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  46. 46. The Railway Metaphor 46 The Booking System The Railway Network The Traveller’s conscious aim of an experience Tertiary-Process Secondary-Process Primary-Process Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  47. 47. A B C D E F Structural ‘gap’ Related stations shared with other train routes Related stations that are unique to train route desired experience-of- itinerary Itinerary to satisfy a demand Demand Structural ‘holes’ or ‘gaps’ • What routes across the country are possible by train? 47Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  48. 48. A B C D E A B C D E F X X F X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Relevant train routes Stations unique to each train route Shared stations Structural ‘gap’ Shared stations Stations unique to train route desired experience-of- itinerary Itinerary to satisfy a demand Demand Itinerary attempting to satisfy a demand XX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Bookings supporting the itinerary All possible train routes Stations Desire structured by ‘holes’ or ‘gaps’ approximation to desired experience-of-itinerary 48Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 approximation to desired experience-of-itinerary
  49. 49. A B C D E A B C D E F X X F X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Relevant train routes Stations unique to each train route Shared stations Structural ‘gap’ Shared stations Stations unique to train route desired experience-of-itinerary Itinerary to satisfy a demand Demand Itinerary attempting to satisfy a demand XX X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Bookings supporting the itinerary Drive for satisfaction [Drang] Aim [Ziel] ‘gap’ [Quelle] All possible train routes Stations Approximation to desired itinerary Approximation to desired experience-of-itinerary [Objekt] The approximation to the desired experience 49Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  50. 50. Primary-Process Emotions: Affects Deeply Subcortical Secondary-Process Learning: Largely Upper Limbic Tertary-Process Cognitions: Largely Neocortical Bottom-up Influences on Ruminations and Thoughts Bottom-up Learning and Development SEEKING, RAGE, FEAR, LUST, CARE, PANIC/ GRIEF & PLAY Top-down Cognitive Regulation Top-down Conditioned Responses inner face of 2nd attention outer face of 2nd attention the subject of the unconscious the subject of perception ‘I’ ego id inner face of 1st attention outer face of 1st attention Drive energies aka ‘quotas of affect’ Relation to the other mediated by languaging Objekt as ‘covering’ wiRgo 50Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 relation to what-is-Really-going-on (wiRgo) - to the thing-in-itself 1st Attention (autonoetic) 2nd Attention (noetic) below-the-surface (anoetic) ψ system  system
  51. 51. THE LACANIAN TWIST 51Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  52. 52. Lacan’s quadripod1 Secondary Process Primary Process 52 Organization of differences Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 Tertiary Process
  53. 53.  ψ-complex thing-presentation ω-system word-presentation Organization of differences relation to what-is- Really-going-on (wiRgo) relation to the social mediated by languaging A B ‘A’ is an organizing influence on ‘B’ A B ‘A’ is an unconscious organizing influence on ‘B’ Lacan’s quadripod2 53 The 1st attention The 2nd attention Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  54. 54. 54 The Booking System The Railway Network Organising Assumptions The Railway Metaphor The thing- in-itself The Traveller’s conscious aim of an experience A B A in context of B: A is an organizing influence on B Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  55. 55. 55 The Booking System (traces) The Railway Network (wigo)  The Traveller’s conscious aim (reading) Organising Assumptions The thing- in-itself (wiRgo) The Railway Metaphor A B A in context of B: A is an organizing influence on B Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  56. 56. 56 The Booking System (traces) The Railway Network (wigo)  The Traveller’s conscious aim (reading) Organising Assumptions The thing- in-itself (wiRgo) The Railway Metaphor -system -complex Unary trait ‘booking’ = facilitating word-presentation ‘pleasure/pain’ = experience of (complexification of) journey ‘journey’ = complexification of quantity qua thing-presentation A B A is an organizing influence on B Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  57. 57. Bion’s approach to a ‘beyond’ of below-the-surface A B C D E F G H 1 2 3 4 5 6 ..n Algebraic Calculus Scientific Deductive System Concept Conception Pre-conception Dream Thoughts, Dreams, Myths  -elements  -elements Ps D The thing-in-itself (O) 57 The way we understand this will be changed by the Lacanian ‘Twist’ Knowing and O can be symmetricKnowing and O can be symmetric Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  58. 58. Working with extimate symptoms – the Lacanian ‘twist’ In being true to desire/heretical, my relation to that which is symptomatic of what I want (lack) is necessarily asymmetric to what I know (being always on the ‘Other’ axis)  -system: word-presentation -complex: thing-presentation $ The ‘Other’ axis Axis of subject of perception Axis of subject of the unconscious 58Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 wiRgo
  59. 59. PART III - RETURNING TO THE PROBLEM Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013 59
  60. 60. The argument It is necessary to identify extimate symptoms of what-is-Really-going-on (wiRgo) • Sovereignty (with its authority) is the assertion of a particular way of anticipating meaning • The unconscious is organized as chains of displacement structured in relation to each other like language is structured, in terms of difference. • The Freudian drive is the experience of structural ‘gaps’ in relation to these chains. • wiRgo is experienced indirectly as what-is-left-out in the way these ‘gaps’ are experienced. • The third (type of) identification can take the subject ‘beyond’ his or her existing knowing into affective/heretical social networks. • Forensic processes* are needed to distinguish the symptoms arising from the third (type of) identification that are strategic from those that are ‘merely’ distracting. 60 * Forensic processes – critical processes capable of examining the existent ontic frameworks in relation to which symptoms are constituted. Two main types of framework are used: • Structural – the formation of the organisational environments in which dynamics are played out • Relational – the patterns of relationship constituting organisation dynamics Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013
  61. 61. END 61Copyright (c) Philip Boxer 2013

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