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2009 IECC: Residential Provisions

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2009 IECC: Residential Provisions

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2009 IECC: Residential Provisions

  1. 1. RESIDENTIAL PROVISIONS for the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Forrest Fielder fielder_4@msn.com 1
  2. 2. Course Objectives • Understand the importance of the IECC in the built environment • Understand the development of the IECC/IRC • Understand the roles of code officials in the IECC • Understand the application of the IECC requirements to building systems 2
  3. 3. What’s Changed from the IECC 2006?  Stringency  CZ4 – fenestration U-factor reduced from .40 to .35  CZ5,6 – wood frame wall U-factor reduced from .06 to .057, minimum R-value (batt only) raised from R-19 to R-20  CZ1,2,3 – Glazed fenestration SHGC reduced from .40 to .30 (except in IRC!)  CZ3 - Basement wall R-value requirements added – 5/13  Reductions allowed in 402.2.1 and 402.2.2 may not be used in the UA tradeoff calculation.  Provisions for attic hatches added (402.2.3)  Requirements added for the location (interior vs. exterior) of insulation in mass walls  CZ1,2 - Exceptions for steel frame walls 24”oc (see table 402.2.5) 3
  4. 4. What’s Changed from the IECC 2006?  Moisture control requirements moved to the IRC (R601.3)  Exemptions for 15sf glazed fenestration and opaque doors may not be used in the UA tradeoff calculation.  Envelope air tightness requirements added – blower door or envelope inspection required (402.4.2 and Table 402.2.2)  (2) of (3) options for recessed lighting eliminated – testing per ASTM E283 now required. Site-built option deleted.  Specific mandatory requirements for elements of mechanical systems specified, replacing Sec 403 (Mandatory) language.  Minimum R-8 for attic “supply” ducts – all others min R-6, except if located in conditioned space.  New requirements for snow melt systems and heated pools.  High efficacy lighting required for 50% of permanently installed fixtures  For performance design, exception added for multiple orientations  For performance design, mechanical tradeoffs disallowed, i.e. proposed design =standard design 4
  5. 5. Overview of IECC Requirements 5 • Focus is on building envelope – Ceilings, walls, windows, floors, foundations – Sets insulation levels, window U-factors and solar heat gain coefficients – Infiltration control - caulk and seal to prevent air leaks • Ducts – seal and insulate • Limited space heating, air conditioning, and water heating requirements – Federal law sets most equipment efficiency requirements, not the I-codes • Lighting equipment – 50% of lamps to be high- efficacy lamps
  6. 6. Does My Project Need to Comply? • One- and two-family residential – IECC/IRC • R-2, R-3, R-4 three stories or less in height – IECC/IRC? • Townhomes – IECC/IRC 6
  7. 7. Are These Projects Considered Residential or Commercial? 7
  8. 8. Mixed Use Buildings 8 • Mixed occupancies – Treat the residential occupancy under the applicable residential code – Treat the commercial occupancy under the commercial code – – Three stories or less – 10% rule (not found in code, in commentary)www.energycodes.gov www.energycodes.gov
  9. 9. What Types of Residential Projects are Exempt from the IECC/IRC?  Unconditioned Spaces  Very Low Energy use buildings (<3.4 Btu/h-ft2 or 1 watt/ft2) – envelope exemption only  Existing Buildings  Unmodified Parts of Residence  Historic Buildings 9
  10. 10. Special Topics - Additions Additions  What is an Addition?  Extension or increase in the conditioned space floor area or height of a building or structure  What Must Comply in an Addition?  New building thermal envelope  New heating and cooling system  New ductwork  New water heating system 10
  11. 11. Special Topics - Additions  How do I Show Compliance for the Addition?  Treat addition as a stand alone building  Prescriptive (Component) approach  Total UA Alternative  Simulated Performance Alternative  Demonstrate compliance for the entire house (addition + existing)  Used for major renovation  Prescriptive (Component) approach  Total UA Alternative  Simulated Performance Alternative 11 Conditioned Addition Existing House Treat Addition As Stand Alone Building Conditioned Addition Existing House Demonstrate Compliance for Entire House
  12. 12. Special Topics - Alterations  Change to the building envelope, heating and cooling system or water heating system that requires a permit  Must show compliance with the applicable provisions in Code  Exceptions  Installing storm windows over existing fenestration  Replacing only the glass in an existing sash and frame  Exposing existing ceiling, wall or floor cavities that are already filled with insulation  Construction that does not expose existing roof, wall or floor cavities 12
  13. 13. Special topics - Alterations (Exceptions) • Re-roofing where neither the sheathing or the insulation is exposed. • Alterations replacing <50% of the luminaires in a space, provided that interior lighting power is not increased • Alterations that replace only bulb and ballast, provided the interior lighting power is not increased. 13
  14. 14. Regulated Items 14 HVAC DHW Building Thermal Envelope Conditioned Space DHWConditioned Space Lighting
  15. 15. Structure of the IECC  Chapter 1 – Administration 2009 includes new provisions to add exempt elements, and to align the IECC with administrative provisions in the other I-codes.  Chapter 2 – Definitions  Chapter 3 – Climate Zones, and Materials, Systems, and Equipment (relocated from 2006 Ch 1)  Chapter 4 – Residential Requirements  Chapter 5 – Commercial Requirements  Chapter 6 – Referenced Standards 15
  16. 16. Chapter 1 • Scoping • Intent • Third party programs – must meet Mandatory Measures • Sections 103 (Construction Documents), & 104 (Inspections) – see extensive Commentary notes 16
  17. 17. Chapter 2 - Definitions  Air barrier – Materials “assembled and joined together”, a single material or combination of materials, i.e. sealants, acting as a system.  Basement wall – “…enclosing conditioned space.” If unconditioned, is classified as a crawl space.  Fenestration – includes skylights & doors.  U-value/R-value – Reciprocal values between transmittance and resistance. Note that U-value includes air films. U-value is calculated through a “component or assembly”, and R-value through a “body”. 402.1.2 (components) and 402.1.3 (assembly) make the difference more clear. C-factor is very similar to U-value (surface to surface instead of air to air) and is used in SHGC calculations.  High-efficacy lamps – minimum lumens/watt requirement  Labeled and Listed – borrowed from the IBC 17
  18. 18. Chapter 3 – Climate Zones • Climate Zone map • Design conditions • Materials, systems, and equipment – relocated from 2006 IECC Chapter 1 18
  19. 19. 2009 IECC Climate Zones 19
  20. 20. 2009 IECC Climate Zones 20 Zone 5 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 2
  21. 21. Climate Zones • Warmer Zones (1 – 4B) – Based on Heating and Cooling Degree Days – Accounts for Humidity • Requirements include features that reduce cooling energy 21
  22. 22. Climate Zones • Predominately Colder Zones (4C – 8) – Based on Heating Degree Days – Accounts for Humidity – Requirements include features that reduce heating energy – Higher the climate zone number the more stringent the requirement 22
  23. 23. Code Compliant Attic Insulation • Attic insulation markers required every 300 square feet for blown-in insulation • Markers must be installed so that R-value mark is readily observable • Insulation R-value Required to be Labeled on Pieces ≥ 12” width, or provide certificate for blown or sprayed insulation 23
  24. 24. Code Compliant Attic Insulation  Provide Certification, Listing (All):  Insulation type  Manufacturer  R-value Installed  Blown or Sprayed Insulation (Fiberglass or Cellulose)  Initial installed thickness  Settled thickness  Settled R-value  Installed density  Coverage area and number of bags  Sprayed Polyurethane Foam (SPF)  Installed thickness  R-value 24
  25. 25. Default U-factors 25 IECC Table 303.1.3(1) and IRC Table N1101.5(1) IECC Table 303.1.3(2) and IRC Table N1101.5(2)
  26. 26. Energy Code Compliance Process 26 Mandatory Provisions Prescriptive Envelope Section 402 Envelope Provisions Section 402.2, 402.3.3 thru 402.3.6 & 402.5 (As Applies) Simulated Performance Section 405 Insulation Requirements Fenestration Section 403.2.1 & 404.1 Table 402.1.3 Section 402.3.1 & 402.3.2 (Trade-Off) Section 402.1.1 & 402.1.2 (Tabular) Section 402.1.3 & 402.1.4 (Trade-Off) Project Complies OR OR
  27. 27. Prescriptive Approach • Compliance Based on Look-Up Tables • Calculations May be Required (See following) What Information Do You Need? • Climate Zone of Proposed Building • Types of Building Assemblies that are Proposed for the Project 27
  28. 28. Prescriptive Approach You Don’t Need to be concerned with Window (i.e. Fenestration) Area • Minimum Area Set by Chapter 3 of the IRC • Maximum Area Set by structural Constraints and By Cost 28
  29. 29. What is Considered Part of the Building Thermal Envelope? • Roof/Ceiling Assembly • Wall Assembly • Windows, Skylights, and Doors • Floor Assembly • Slab Edge • Basement Wall • SHGC, U-Factor 29  Climate Specific Requirements:  Boundary Between Conditioned Space and the Great Outdoors or Unconditioned Space Includes:
  30. 30. Envelope R-Value • What Counts Towards R-Value? – Add • Insulation Layers • Insulation between Framing • Insulation over Framing – Don’t Add • Non Insulation Products • Sheathing less than R-2 • Air Films • Air Spaces – Framing Spaces (or amount) Doesn’t Matter 30
  31. 31. Building Envelope • Roof/Ceiling Assembly • Wall Assembly 31
  32. 32. Building Envelope • Vertical Fenestration and Skylights • Floor Assembly 32
  33. 33. Overview of Tables 402.1.1(IECC) and N1102.1(IRC) – Component Approach CLIMATE ZONE FENESTRATION U-FACTOR b SKYLIGHT b U-FACTOR GLAZED FENESTRATION b,e SHGC CEILING R-VALUE WOOD FRAME WALL R-VALUE MASS WALL R-VALUE i FLOOR R- VALUE BASEMENT c WALL R-VALUE SLAB d R-VALUE & DEPTH CRAWL SPACE c WALL R-VALUE 1 1.20 0.75 0.30 30 13 3 / 4 13 0 0 0 2 0.65j 0.75 0.30 30 13 4 / 6 13 0 0 0 3 0.50j 0.65 0.30 30 13 5 / 8 19 5 / 13f 0 5 / 13 4 except Marine 0.35 0.60 NR 38 13 5 / 10 19 10 / 13 10, 2ft 10 / 13 5 and Marine 4 0.35 0.60 NR 38 20 or 13+5h 13 / 17 30g 10 / 13 10, 2 ft 10 / 13 6 0.35 0.60 NR 49 20 or 13+5h 15 / 19 30g 15 / 19 10, 4 ft 10 / 13 7 and 8 0.35 0.60 NR 49 21 19 / 21 38g 15 / 19 10, 4 ft 10 / 13 33 Table 402.1.1 Insulation and Fenestration Requirements by Componenta a. R-values are minimums, U-factors and SHGC are maximums, R-19 batts compressed into a nominal 2 x 6 framing cavity such that the R-value is reduced by R-1 or more shall be marked with the compressed batt R-value in addition to the full thickness R-value. b. The fenestration U-factor column excludes skylights. The SHGC column applies to all glazed fenestration. c. “15/19” means R-15 continuous insulated sheathing on the interior or exterior of the home or R-19 cavity insulation at the interior of the basement wall. “15/19” shall be permitted to be met with R-13 cavity insulation on the interior of the basement wall plus R-5 continuous insulated sheathing on the interior or exterior of the home. “10/13” means R-10 continuous insulated sheathing on the interior or exterior of the home or R-13 cavity insulation at the interior of the basement wall. d. R-5 shall be added to the required slab edge R-values for heated slabs. Insulation depth shall be the depth of the footing or 2 feet, whichever is less in Zones 1 through 3 for heated slabs. e. There are no SHGC requirements in the Marine Zone. f. Basement wall insulation is not required in warm-humid locations as defined by Figure 301.1 and Table 301.1. g. Or insulation sufficient to fill the framing cavity, R-19 minimum. h. “13+5” means R-13 cavity insulation plus R-5 insulated sheathing. If structural sheathing covers 25 percent or less of the exterior, insulating sheathing is not required where structural sheathing is used. If structural sheathing covers more than 25 percent of exterior, structural sheathing shall be supplemented with insulated sheathing of at least R-2. i. The second R-value applies when more than half the insulation is on the interior of the mass wall. j. For impact rated fenestration complying with Section R301.2.1.2 of the IRC or Section 1608.1.2 of the IBC, maximum U-factor shall be 0.75 in Zone 2 and 0.65 in Zone 3. 0.75 0.65 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.40 19 30 0 10/13
  34. 34. U-factor Alternative to Meeting the Table 402.1.1/N1102.1 R-Value Requirements CLIMATE ZONE FENESTRATION U-FACTOR SKYLIGHT U-FACTOR CEILING U-FACTOR FRAME WALL U-FACTOR MASS WALL U- FACTOR b FLOOR U-FACTOR BASEMENT WALL U-FACTOR d CRAWL SPACE WALL U-FACTOR c 1 1.20 0.75 0.035 0.082 0.197 0.064 0.360 0.477 2 0.65 0.75 0.035 0.082 0.165 0.064 0.360 0.477 3 0.50 0.65 0.035 0.082 0.141 0.047 0.091c 0.136 4 except Marine 0.35 0.60 0.030 0.082 0.141 0.047 0.059 0.065 5 and Marine 4 0.35 0.60 0.030 0.057 0.082 0.033 0.059 0.065 6 0.35 0.60 0.026 0.057 0.060 0.033 0.050 0.065 7 and 8 0.35 0.60 0.026 0.057 0.057 0.028 0.050 0.065 34 Table 402.1.3 (IECC) and N1102.2 (IRC) a. Non-fenestration U-factors shall be obtained from measurement, calculation or an approved source. b. When more than half the insulation is on the interior, the mass wall U-factors shall be a maximum of 0.17 in Zone 1, 0.14 in Zone 2, 0.12 in Zone 3, 0.10 in Zone 4 except Marine, and the same as the frame wall U-factor in Marine Zone 4 and Zones 5 through 8. c. Basement wall U-factor of 0.360 in warm-humid locations as defined by Figure 301.1 and Table 301.2.
  35. 35. U-factor Calculation U-factors Are To Be Calculated Based On ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals – Include thermal bridging affects of framing 35 Percent of wall with framing Percent of wall without framing 0.10060.0572Total Unadjusted U- factors 9.9417.48Total Unadjusted R- values 0.170.17Outside Air Film 0.180.187/8” Stucco 5.005.001” Cellular Polyurethane 3.46-----2 X 4 @ 16” O.C. ----11.00R-11 Fiberglass Batt Insulation 0.450.451/2” Gypsum Board 0.680.68Inside Air Film Frame R-valueCavity R-valueList of Components Percent of wall with framing Percent of wall without framing Uo = (0.0572 X 0.85) + (0.1006 X 0.15) = 0.0637 0.10060.0572Total Unadjusted U- factors (1/R-value) 9.9417.48Total Unadjusted R- values 0.170.17Outside Air Film 0.180.187/8” Stucco 5.005.001” Cellular Polyurethane 3.46-----2 X 4 @ 16” O.C. ----11.00R-11 Fiberglass Batt Insulation 0.450.451/2” Gypsum Board 0.680.68Inside Air Film Frame R-valueCavity R-valueList of Components
  36. 36. Total UA Alternative • Allows Efficiency Trade-offs Between Building Assemblies – Whole building approach allowing portions of the building to under comply if portions over comply with the code – Based on Table 402.1.3/N1102.1.2 Equivalent U- factors • Basis for US DOE REScheck software 36
  37. 37. UA Alternative eliminates exceptions Eliminates the following exceptions: – Opaque door, 24 ft2 – Fenestration U-factor, 15 ft2 – Fenestration SHGC, 15 ft2 – Ceiling tradeoff, R49 to R38 / R38 to R30 – Ceiling w/o attic space, R30, 500ft2 37
  38. 38. Total UA Alternative Sample Calculation • UA = (Uw X Aw) + (Ug X Ag) + (Ud + Ad) + (Uf X Af) + (Ur x Ar) Where: – UA = Total U-factor X Area for Whole Building – Uw = U-factor of Wall Assembly – Ug = U-factor of Glass Assembly – Ud = U-factor of Door Assembly – Uf = U-factor of Floor Assembly – Ur = U-factor of Roof Assembly – Aw = Area of Wall Assembly – Ag = Area of Glass Assembly – Ad = Area of Door Assembly – Af = Area of Floor Assembly – Ar = Area of Roof Assembly 38
  39. 39. Fenestration U-factor Glazed Fenestration Exemption - Up to 15 ft2 of glazed fenestration Does not apply to U-factor approach • Example Uses – Stained glass windows – Glass block – Door side lites 39
  40. 40. Glazed Fenestration SHGC What is Solar Heat Gain Coefficient? – A simple way to explain SHGC is in terms of a ratio; where 1 is the maximum amount of solar heat gain that can come through a window and 0 is the least amount. An SHGC of 0.40 then means that 40% of the available solar heat is coming through the window . 40
  41. 41. Glazed Fenestration SHGC How are fenestration products rated? – NFRC 200 • Default U-factors from Table 303.1.3(3) – IECC or N1101.5(3) - IRC 41
  42. 42. Glazed Fenestration SHGC SHGC Area Weighted Average – An area weighted average (including skylights) may be used to meet the SHGC requirement. Example: Window 1 SHGC- 0.35 100 ft2 Window 2 SHGC- 0.50 50 ft2 Window 3 SHGC- 0.40 50 ft2 (100 ft2 X 0.35) + (50 ft2 X 0.50) + (50 ft2 X 0.40) = 200 ft2 Average SHGC of .40 42
  43. 43. Fenestration U-Factor, UA Alternative Special Rules – Maximum fenestration U-factor • Area weighted average maximum vertical fenestration U-factor – IECC – Zones 4 – 5: 0.48 – IECC – Zones 6 – 8: 0.40 – IRC – Zones 6 – 8: 0.35 • Thermally isolated sunroom maximum skylight U- factor – IECC – Zones 4 – 8: 0.75 – IRC – Zones 4 – 8: 0.75 43
  44. 44. Fenestration U-factor U-factor Area Weighted Average may be used to meet the u-factor requirement. Example: Window 1U- 0.35 100 ft2 Window 2U- 0.50 50 ft2 Window 3U- 0.40 50 ft2 (100 ft2 X 0.35) + (50 ft2 X 0.50) + (50 ft2 X 0.40) 200 ft2 =U-0.40 Average 44
  45. 45. Fenestration U-factor What is considered fenestration in Tables 402.1.1and N1102.1?  Vertical windows  Opaque doors  Glazed doors  Glazed block  Combination opaque/glazed doors 45
  46. 46. Fenestration U-factor How are fenestration products rated? – NFRC 100 46 U-Factor Now: CZ2 u-0.65 CZ3 u-0.50 CZ4 u-0.35 Was: CZ2 u-0.75 CZ3 u-0.65 CZ4 u-0.40
  47. 47. Door U-Factor All Doors are Considered Fenestration • Must Meet Fenestration U-factor Requirement – Can exempt one “side hinged” opaque door assembly up to 24 ft2 47 Courtesy Jeldwen Doors
  48. 48. Skylight U-Factor What is a Skylight? – Installed at a slope of 15 degrees or more from vertical • No Limit on Skylight Area • NFRC 100 • Default U-factors per Table 303.1.3(1) – IECC, N1101.5(1) – IRC 48
  49. 49. Wood Frame Wall R-Value Walls: 50% above grade and Enclosing conditioned space, wood framed Includes  Between floor spandrels  Peripheral edges of floors, roof and basement knee walls  Dormer walls  Gable end walls  Walls enclosing a mansard roof  Skylight shafts 49
  50. 50. R-Value computation How Do I Insulate to Meet the Requirements? – Install insulation between framing – Install insulation between framing and over the face of the stud (continuous) – Insulation R-values can be added 50
  51. 51. Wood Frame Wall R-Value Structural Sheathing Allowance  R-5 where there is no structural sheathing  If structural sheathing covers > 25%, supplement with R-2 insulating sheathing over structural sheathing 51
  52. 52. Advanced Framing – Optimum Value Engineering • Building codes allow for advanced wall framing • Insulated corners, two-stud corner • Ladder framing for interior walls • Increased insulation • Single Top Plate • Insulated Headers (non bearing exterior walls) Span requirements can dictate a full bearing header. 52
  53. 53. Code Compliant Wall Insulation Installation Batt Insulation Required to be Labeled on Pieces ≥ 12” Wide, or provide Certification Listing:  Insulation type  Manufacturer  R-value Installed (R-19 Marked if Compressed) Blown or Sprayed Insulation (Fiberglass or Cellulose)  R-value  Installed density  Coverage area and number of bags Sprayed Polyurethane Foam (SPF)  Installed thickness  R-value 53
  54. 54. Ceiling R-value Ceiling R-value Requirements Based on Ceiling Assembly Type – Ceilings with attic spaces – Ceilings without attic spaces 54
  55. 55. Ceiling R-value - Ceilings With Attic Spaces Options for meeting requirements – Standard truss system – Install R- value of insulation to meet the requirements specified in Table 402.1.1/N1102.1 55 Cold corners contribute to condensation and mold growth. Possibility of ice dam formations. Potential Cold Climate Issues:
  56. 56. Ceiling R-value - Ceilings With Attic Spaces  Options for meeting requirements  Oversized Truss / Energy Truss / Raised Heel Truss  Substitute R- 30 for R-38 Insulation  Substitute R- 38 for R-49 Insulation  Goal – Provide full height, uncompressed insulation over exterior wall plate at the eaves 56 Baffling to prevent insulation from blocking ventilation Raised Heel Truss Baffling to prevent insulation from blocking ventilation
  57. 57. Ceiling R-value – Ceilings Without Attic Spaces  Can install minimum R-30 insulation in roof assemblies that require > R-30  Only allowed in assemblies with insufficient space to install greater than R-30  Only allowed in ceiling areas up to 500 ft2 or 20% whichever is less 57
  58. 58. Conditioned Attics • IRC recognizes conditioned attics (Chapter 8) • Sets requirements (e.g. vapor retarders, air-impermeable insulation, application) • Recognizes interaction between roofing materials and impermeable insulation • US Department of Energy (DOE) building guides • http://www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/building_america/for_builders.html 58
  59. 59. Steel Framed Assemblies • Steel Frame Assemblies Must Meet the Requirements of Table 402.2.5-IECC or N1102.2.5 - IRC 59
  60. 60. Floor R-Value What Floors Types Are Covered? – Floors Over: • Unconditioned space • Vented crawlspace • Unconditioned garage • Outside air 60
  61. 61. Code Compliant Raised Floor Insulation • Insulation must fill the floor joist cavity from joist to joist and be in permanent contact with the subfloor 61 Insulation Must Fill From Joist to Joist
  62. 62. Section 403 - Systems Section 403.1 - Controls • Each heating or cooling system shall have a thermostat • For forced-air systems, a programmable thermostat is required, with a setback range of 55 ̊F to 85 ̊F, and initial programming of 70 ̊F (heating) and 78 ̊F (cooling) • Heat pumps with supplementary electric heat shall have controls to prevent operation of the supplemental heat when the heat pump can meet the load. 62
  63. 63. Section 403.2.1 - Ducts Insulation (Prescriptive) Heating and Cooling Equipment – Duct Insulation • Supply ducts in attics shall be insulated to an R-8 • All other ducts (returns) shall be insulated to an R-6 • Ducts inside the building thermal envelope are exempt 63
  64. 64. Section 4.3.3 – Mechanical System Piping Insulation • (Minimum) R-3 for piping carrying fluids above 105 ̊F or below 55 ̊F. 64
  65. 65. Section 403.2.1 – Duct Sealing • Ducts, air handlers, filters, cavities used as ducts to be sealed per IRC M1601.4.1 • Duct tightness to be verified by  Postconstruction test – leakage to outdoors @ (max ) 8 cfm/100sf(25Pa) of conditioned space, or  Rough-in test – total leakage @ (max) 6cfm/100sf(25PA) of conditioned space Exception – testing not required if air handler and all ducts are located within conditioned space 65
  66. 66. Building Envelope Mandatory Requirements Air Leakage Controls – Goal is to limit infiltration – Limit both heat and moisture flow – Air sealant materials must allow for differential expansion and contraction between dissimilar materials 66
  67. 67. What Options are Available as an Air Sealant? • Caulking • Gasketing • Weatherstripping • Sealed with an air barrier material, suitable film or solid material • Self sealing continuous materials - examples – Concrete – SIPS – ICF 67
  68. 68. Air Sealing • Required Sealing around Tub/Shower Enclosure and Attic Knee wall • Recessed Lighting IC-Rated 68 Section 402.4.1 Air Leakage Thermal Envelope Requirements 1. All joints, seams and penetrations 2. Site-built windows, doors and skylights 3. Between window and door assemblies and framing 4. Utility penetrations 5. Dropped ceilings or chases 6. Knee walls 7. Walls and ceilings separating a garage 8. Behind tubs and showers on exterior walls 9. Common walls between dwelling units 10. Attic access openings. 11. Rim joists junction 12. Other sources of infiltration
  69. 69. 402.4.2.1 Testing option. Building envelope tightness and insulation installation shall be considered acceptable when tested air leakage is less than 7 ACH when tested with a blower door at a pressure of 50 Pascal's. Testing shall occur after rough in and after installation of penetrations of the building envelope, including penetrations for utilities, plumbing, electrical, ventilation, and combustion appliances. 402.4.2 Air sealing and insulation. …shall be demonstrated to comply with one of the following options : Air Sealing 69
  70. 70. 402.4.2.2 Visual inspection option: Building envelope tightness and insulation installation shall be considered acceptable when the items listed in Table 402.4.2, applicable to the method of construction, are field verified. Where required by the code official, an approved party independent from the installer of the insulation, shall inspect the air barrier and insulation. Air Sealing 70
  71. 71. Air barrier and thermal barrier Ceiling / attic Walls Windows and doors Rim joists Floors (including above garage and cantilevered floors) Crawlspace walls Exterior thermal envelope insulation for framed walls is installed in substantial contact and continuous alignment with building envelope air barrier. Breaks or joints in the air barrier are filled or repaired. Air permeable insulation is not used as a sealing material. Air permeable insulation is inside of an air barrier. Air barrier in any dropped ceiling / soffit is substantially aligned with insulation and any gaps are sealed. Attic access (except unvented attic), knee wall door, or drop down stair is sealed. Corners and headers are insulated. Junction of foundation and sill plate is sealed. Space between window/door jambs and framing is sealed. Rim joists are insulated and include an air barrier. Insulation is installed to maintain permanent contact with underside of subfloor decking. Air barrier is installed at any exposed edge of insulation. Insulation is permanently attached to walls. Exposed earth in unvented crawlspaces is covered with class I vapor retarder with overlapping joints taped. COMPONENT CRITERIA AIR BARRIER AND INSULATION INSPECTION Table 402.4.2 - Air Sealing 71
  72. 72. Shafts, penetrations Narrow cavities Garage separation Recessed lighting Plumbing and Wiring Shower/tub on ext. wall Electrical / phone box on exterior walls Common wall HVAC register boots Fireplace Duct shafts, utility penetrations, knee walls, and flue shafts opening to exterior or unconditioned space are sealed. Batts in narrow cavities are cut to fit, or narrow cavities are filled by sprayed/blown insulation. Air sealing is provided between the garage and conditioned spaces. Recessed light fixtures are airtight, IC rated, and sealed to drywall. Exception--fixtures in conditioned space. Insulation is placed between outside and pipes. Batt insulation is cut to fit around wiring and plumbing, or sprayed/blown insulation extends behind piping and wiring. Showers and tubs on exterior walls have insulation and an air barrier separating them from the exterior wall. Air barrier extends behind boxes or an air sealed type boxes are installed. Air barrier is installed in common wall between dwelling units. HVAC register boots that penetrate building envelope are sealed to subfloor or drywall. Fireplace walls include an air barrier. COMPONENT CRITERIA AIR BARRIER AND INSULATION INSPECTION Table 402.4.2 - Air Sealing 72
  73. 73. Air Sealing Recessed Lighting Fixtures 3 Options: – IC-Rated and meeting ASTM E 283 ≤ 2.0 CFM leakage – Sealed with a gasket or caulk between the housing and interior wall or ceiling surface. 73
  74. 74. Systems Mandatory Requirements Systems Include • Heating and cooling systems • Circulating water heating systems • Snow melt controls • Pool heaters and covers 74
  75. 75. Systems Mandatory Requirements • Heating and Cooling Equipment – System sealing is required including: • Ducts • Air handlers • Filter boxes • Building cavities used as ducts 75
  76. 76. Systems Mandatory Requirements Heating and Cooling Equipment Duct Sealing Section 403.2.2 IECC and M1601.4.1 IRC • Can seal with tapes, mastics, gasketing and other approved closure devices • Rigid fibrous glass ducts – Pressure sensitive tapes UL 181 A “181 A-P” – Mastic UL 181 A “181 A-M” – Heat sensitive tape UL 181 A “181 A-H” • Flexible air duct – Pressure sensitive tape UL 181B “181B-FX” – Mastic UL 181B “181B-M” 76
  77. 77. 1. Post construction test: Leakage to outdoors shall be < 8 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area or, < 12 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area across entire system 2. Rough-in test: Total leakage shall be < 6 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area, at 25 Pa across rough system. If air handler not installed at test, then test at 4 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area 3. Exception: Duct tightness testing is not required if air handler and ALL ducts are located within the conditioned space. 403.2.2 All ducts, air handlers, filter boxes and building cavities used as ducts shall be sealed. : Systems Mandatory Requirements Ducts - Sealing 77
  78. 78. Systems Requirements • Heating and Cooling Equipment – Each separate space conditioning system shall have a control – Special thermostat for heat pump systems – R-2 for piping carrying fluids > 105 ˚F or < 55˚F – Outdoor air intakes or exhausts shall have dampers 78 Initially programmed with heating temperature set point no higher than 70oF and a cooling temperature set point no lower than 78oF
  79. 79. Systems Mandatory Requirements • Heating and cooling equipment shall be sized in accordance with ACCA Manual J (IRC M1401.3) – or approved method – Outdoor design temperatures per ACCA Manual S – Indoor design temperatures • ≤ 72 ˚F Heating • ≥ 75 ˚F Cooling 79
  80. 80. Systems Mandatory Requirements • Water Heating – Circulating hot water system piping to be insulated to an R-2 – Ability to switch the system off when not in use • Manual switch • Automatic switch 80
  81. 81. Section 403.5 – Mechanical Ventilation • Outdoor air intakes and exhausts shall have gravity or automatic dampers that close when the system is not in operation. 81
  82. 82. Section 403.6 – Equipment Sizing • Equipment to be sized in accordance with IRC M1401.3 – ACCA Manual S with loads calculated per ACCA Manual J 82
  83. 83. Section 403.7 – Systems Serving Multiple Dwelling Units • Such systems shall comply with Sec 503 and 504 (Commercial) instead of 403. 83
  84. 84. Section 403.8 – Snow Melt Controls • Such systems shall be provided with automatic controls to shut off the system when pavement temperature is above 50 ̊F, and with auto or manual controls to shutoff the systems when outdoor temperature is above 40 ̊F. 84
  85. 85. Section 403.0 – Pools • Pool heaters – All pool heaters shall be provided with a readily accessible shutoff switch, Gas-fired heaters shall not have continuously burning pilots. • Pool heaters and pumps shall be provided with programmable shutoff switches, except where pumps are required to operate solar or waste heat recovery systems. • Heated pools shall be provided with vapor retardant covers. Pools heated to more than 90 ̊F shall have R-12 covers, except for pools deriving more than 60% of their energy from a solar or site- recovered source. 85
  86. 86. Section 404 - Lighting • High-Efficacy Lamps  T-8 or smaller  60 lumens per watt over 40 watts  50 lumens per watt over 15 watts to 40 watts  40 lumens per watt 15 watts or less – 50% of lamps 86
  87. 87. Total UA Alternative - REScheck 87
  88. 88. Simulated Performance • Simulates the Energy Use of a Proposed Residence and Determines the Cost to Operate Annually • Most Flexible Energy Code Compliance Approach, Accounts for: • House tightness • Heating and cooling efficiency • Service water heating efficiency • Building orientation • Thermal mass • Duct leakage 88
  89. 89. Simulated Performance < Proposed Design Energy Estimation Tool Building Complies W hen The: Energy Cost of Proposed Energy use of Standard Standard Design < Proposed Design Energy Estimation Tool Building Complies W hen The: Energy Cost of Proposed Energy use of Standard Standard Design 89
  90. 90. Simulated Performance Required Documentation – Compliance report • Address of residence • Inspection checklist • Compliance author • Name and version of compliance software Optional documentation – Standard reference and proposed design documentation – Certification showing building component characteristics of proposed design • Must be signed by the builder 90 HVAC trade-off eliminated in 2009 IECC
  91. 91. Energy Code Compliance Process 91 Mandatory Provisions Prescriptive Envelope Section 402 Envelope Provisions Section 402.2, 402.3.3 thru 402.3.6 & 402.5 (As Applies) Simulated Performance Section 405 Insulation Requirements Fenestration Section 403.2.1 & 404.1 Table 402.1.3 Section 402.3.1 & 402.3.2 (Trade-Off) Section 402.1.1 & 402.1.2 (Tabular) Section 402.1.3 & 402.1.4 (Trade-Off) Project Complies OR OR
  92. 92. Above Code Programs Allows National, State and Local Energy Efficiency Programs as Alternatives to Complying with the 2009 IECC or IRC – Program must exceed the current energy code – Must be approved by the code official or the authority having jurisdiction – Must meet mandatory requirements 92
  93. 93. Additional Resources Websites • International Codes Council www.iccsafe.org/ • US Department of Energy www.energycodes.gov/ • National Fenestration Rating Council, Inc www.nfrc.org • New Buildings Institute www.newbuildings.org • United State Department of Energy, Building Codes Program • Submit a question at Ask an Energy Codes Expert • Locate compliance software - visit U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Software Tools Directory for more information. • International Codes Council (ICC), Code clarification for ICC Members - 1-888-ICC-SAFE (1-888-422-7233) • Simplyinsulate.com • CONTACT INFO: Forrest Fielder, fielder_4@msn.com 93 .

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