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2009 IECC: Residential

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The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code: Residential

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2009 IECC: Residential

  1. 1. The Energy Code Workshop Understanding the Energy Code
  2. 2. I. Review of the “why and the what” II. Team Exercise: energy efficiency strategies III. Market-driven data as defined by scalable and market- proven IV. Four market-proven case studies that conform to the 2009 IECC V. Top 5 marketing strategies for crafting the energy efficiency message
  3. 3. Focus group findings: 1. money 2. not practical 3. confusing 4. enviro/eco/sustainable/LEED/green
  4. 4. Energy Code Facts & a review of the
  5. 5. U.S. residential and commercial buildings together use more energy and emit more carbon dioxide than either industrial or transportation sector and: 39% of total energy 2/3 of electricity 1/8 of water
  6. 6. Energy Codes and Energy Efficient Buildings: • set minimum requirements for energy efficient design and comfort • are more comfortable, healthy, and cost less to operate • can create new economic opportunities for business by promoting new energy efficient technologies • Cost less to operate, meaning increased bottom line • put more money in the consumers pocket • estimated to generate cost savings of over 2.5B per year when guided by the IECC 2099
  7. 7. Utility bill reduction estimates 2009 IECC versus the 2006 IECC = 17% greater savings in the Phoenix area. 2012 IECC versus the 2006 IECC = 26.8% - 28.7% greater savings in Phoenix. 2015 IECC versus the 2006 IECC = 50% savings goal.
  8. 8. Economic impact of the 2009 IECC · The one-time cost for a builder to build an average home to the 2009 IECC is $560/home. · The homeowner is expected to save $211/per year on their energy bills – for the life of the home. · If the numbers hold true, the average homeowner’s mortgage payment will go up less than $3.50 per month, while their utility bills will drop more than $17.50 per month. Even if we assume utility costs don’t rise in the next 30 years, the average homeowner will keep more than $5,000 in their pockets over the life of their mortgage. · Building just 10,000 homes will result in roughly $5.6 million in one-time, taxable construction costs that will return approximately $50 million in resident savings over the life of their mortgages. · A large piece of the $5.6 million in additional construction costs will be creating jobs for local testing and inspection companies.
  9. 9. 2009 IECC & a review of the ‘what’
  10. 10. Notable requirements in the 2009 IECC for Arizona: Building envelope must be caulked and sealed. Slab-on-grade insulation is R-10 to a depth of 2 feet in Zones 4 and 5. Insulation is not required for slab-on-grade foundations in Zones 2 and 3. Supply ducts in attics must be insulated to R-8. Return ducts in attics and all ducts in crawlspaces, unheated basements, garages, or otherwise outside building envelope must be insulated to R-6. All ducts must be sealed and either: o verified by pressure testing – the duct system has to be tested and the air leakage out of ducts must be kept to an acceptable maximum level. o installed entirely within the building thermal envelope – testing is not required if all ducts are inside the building thermal envelope (for example in heated basements), though the ducts still have to be sealed. Piping for hydronic (boiler) heating systems must be insulated to R-3. Although vapor retarders are not required by the IECC, the I-codes do set wall vapor retarder requirements in Section R601.3 of the 2009 IRC, and vapor retarders are required in Zone 5. Less insulation is allowed for mass walls and more insulation is required for steel framing. 50% of the lighting “lamps” (bulbs, tubes, etc.) in a building must be high efficacy. Compact fluorescents qualify, standard incandescent bulbs do not. Standard I-code administrative requirements (inspections, documentation) apply. A certificate must be posted near the electrical panel listing insulation levels and other energy efficiency measures.
  11. 11. Requirements for Arizona http://energycode.pnl.gov/EnergyCodeReqs/ ?state=Arizona
  12. 12. 2009 Energy Code Savings vs 2006
  13. 13. Stubmbling upon the 2009 IECC and the Unforeseen Outcomes
  14. 14. Video: a case study location, Phoenix local, market proven, scalable,
  15. 15. Phoenix and Maricopa County Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 2005 897 851 1239 1229 972 867 783 934 1028 754 774 1108 Maricopa 42727 2006 837 1239 925 632 1218 862 793 710 590 400 512 513 Maricopa 27812 2007 562 813 859 638 693 632 391 352 173 164 155 201 Maricopa 20183 2008 174 204 244 240 213 292 285 108 135 116 72 93 Maricopa 9643 2009 71 39 70 113 138 200 149 Maricopa 3728 131 107 128 100 90 6462 2010 104 (532) 135 (601) 199 (769) 103 (499) 69 (460) 106 94 83 81 43 54 40 7109 2011 60 61 56 113 (2182)
  16. 16. BEFORE
  17. 17. Pre HERS 208 Post HERS 65 ($48 avg month) Annual Savings $1200 Water Savings 62% Purchase 90k Days on Market 23 Sales Price 240k
  18. 18. Denver’s first emerald purchase price - 92k improve - 50k sales price - 185k EMERALD CERTIFIED
  19. 19. 43
  20. 20. 44
  21. 21. 46 THE 2009 ENERGY CODE
  22. 22. Special Thanks to: City of Phoenix, Economic Development
  23. 23. video
  24. 24. tecworkshop.com facebook.com/gstreetinc

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