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Phil (1)

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Phil (1)

  1. 1. Bradford Brewery Opens! Last month saw the opening of the long- awaited Bradford Brewery. I was invited down to the independent quarter in Bradford’s city centre for a pre-open night to sample the first Bradford brew for six decades – in fact, since Hammond’s Brewery closed in 1955. In attendance was the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress of Bradford, who together pulled the first pint. Some of Bradford’s councillors and press were also there. The brew itself was quite a pleasant surprise. It had a distinctive fruity taste; quite unique. It reminded me of beers in Eastern Europe. I could imagine it would have gone down very well with the wool merchants and factory workers of Victorian Bradford. The brewery was also serving award-winning Pieminister Pies, a well-known brand at music festivals. These were served in a trendy box with mushy peas and gravy. The brewing business is quite scientific. It takes great skill to produce something like this brew, soon to be seen in pubs all over Bradford and beyond. Hats off to Steve Crump, the brewmaster. The Brewfactory Bar will be showcasing beers from other UK breweries as well. Later the Lord Mayor gave an uplifting speech and welcomed the new enterprises now opening in the area. Matthew Halliday spoke of his dream of bringing the micro-brewing industry to Bradford after seeing its success in London and other towns around the UK. The building itself was once the home of Shaw’s Moisture Meters. This company manufactured a very important invention in the wool trade that could detect the amount of water in wool bales. Next to the brewery is the Brewfactory pub. The pub decor has a very simple, rustic look about it and has cleverly integrated plywood and existing brickwork. Lantern-type lights hang from the ceiling and there are a number of neon lights around the place, one saying “Made of Bradford”. PR consultant Gerry Crookes of Crux Communications, who’s been marketing the brewery, said that the design team had wanted to give it the feel of the old factory, blended with a more contemporary urban style. The Shaw’s were keen to preserve the history and look of the building. And that sums up the place: the old with the new. A forward-looking enterprise remembering Bradford’s rich past. I had a great night and met many Facebook and Twitter friends. If you are paying a visit it’s just off Westgate, BD1 3SQ on the map. Lots more info on the Facebook page. 36 THE LOCAL LEADER SPRING 2015 PHIL’S PHOTOGRAPHY WALKABOUTS In our popular column, Phil writes about where he’s been with his camera recently and tells the story of his travels across the BD postcode! ........................................................................................................................................... Article sponsored by:
  2. 2. Opening of the BeerHouse Most of my walkabouts this edition have been in the rapidly rising independent quarter. Recently I was invited to the long- awaited opening of the BeerHouse on North Parade. Housed within a Grade II-listed building, it was once the home of the Liverpool and Victoria Insurance and, more recently, a furniture shop. The new venture was designed by David Craig, who also designed the nearby Record Café. If you’re about the town, call in for the Beerhouse experience – a perfect venue to meet up after work or go for a night out with a group of friends. It has a bright, friendly and modern atmosphere with a very homely feeling. It also boasts a great-looking menu, from snacks and nibbles to traditional pub food; from the humble jacket potato to a whole chicken from the tandoor oven. The menu also has an impressive list of wines from all over the world. I had the Beerhouse mixed grill and a pint of Timothy Taylor’s “Landlord”, which I would highly recommend. It felt like a place you could relax after work or shopping, or just sit with a drink by the window and watch the world go by in the new independent quarter! The bar area runs the full length of the back wall, backed up by knowledgeable and helpful bar staff. The BeerHouse is just what the area needed – right place, right time, I’d say. It's leading the way and opening the gates for more enterprise, making North Parade the place to be in Bradford. 38 THE LOCAL LEADER SPRING 2015 ..................................................................................................................
  3. 3. 39 THE LOCAL LEADER SPRING 2015 Under the town hall clock The Bradford Police Museum is a new museum dedicated to showcasing the history of policing in Bradford. For many years I have wanted a look in the cells “under the town hall clock” – for historical interest, not as a lodger! The cells had been used as a storeroom for thousands of council documents. At last there was a big clear-out. The museum opened late last year for a trial run and it was quite clear that it was going to be a popular attraction. So at the end of February I went to the reopening of the Bradford Police Museum. The entrance is at the front of City Hall in Centenary Square. You will see the board outside. The museum is not Bradford Council-run and is in fact a charity, so there is a small charge for a tour of the Victorian cells. On entering there is a large room filled with glass cabinets containing lots of interesting historical photos that you can browse through before you are taken by one of the guides around the Victorian cells for a fascinating look into a world not many of us would have seen. Built in 1873, the cells were actually part of Lockwood and Mawson’s plans when designing the new town hall. It has changed very little since. On the tour you will get a feel for what a dreadful place it would have been, not only in Victorian times but right up to when it closed. You are shown through the big doors at the back of City Hall, where the guide will explain what would happen to the arrested person. They would be taken up to the charge desk. Their pockets would then be emptied and they would be booked in; they would then be taken a short distance to the cells. The first cell you visit has an interesting story connected with it about a famous man from the past who made his escape when he visited Bradford in 1905. Not wanting to give too much away about the tour of the cells, I think it’s well worth a visit: a must- see Bradford attraction both for locals and visitors to the city. For more info there is a Facebook page, or visit the following website: www.bradfordpolicemuseum.com ..........................................................................................................................................................
  4. 4. The Five Rise Locks Staircase locks are two or more locks joined to- gether so that the bottom gates of one lock are the top of gates of the next. On the Leeds–Liverpool canal near Bingley we have a fantastic example: a staircase of five locks that lifts boats up 60 feet. And have been doing it for over 200 years. Built in 1774 and designed by John Longman of Halifax, the locks won a heritage award in 1975. Today it looks as just as good as it did when built, but in fact it’s a bit like Trigger’s brush in the classic episode of Only Fools and Horses – the lock gates have to be completely replaced every 25 years. They are specially made at a firm near Castleford. You can get to the canal from Bingley town centre via a bridge that passes over the new bypass. That will bring you out at the smaller Three Rise Locks. Turn left and just a short walk later you will come upon the majesty of the Five Rise Locks. If you felt like a bit more walking it’s just 111 miles to Liverpool, or in the other direction, 16 miles to Leeds! Or if you are a bit like me, a few yards up the path there is a great café that does some amazing cakes and pots of tea. 40 THE LOCAL LEADER SPRING 2015 North Parade - bit of history As in many modern towns, the North Parade area of Bradford is today just starting to bounce back from a deep depression that had a negative effect on high-street shops all over the country. With help from a Bradford Council scheme, many new businesses are emerging: shops, pubs, restaurants and cosy cafés. The area has now been dubbed “the independent quarter”. Businesspeople are now gaining the confidence to invest in the area, and feedback from places like The Bradford Brewery, The Beerhouse and many more has been amazing. It’s hard to believe that in 1815 the area around North Parade was a tranquil, semi-rural spot with a few buildings and a manor house (occupied by the Rawson family). Twice a year they had the Bradford Pleasure Fair, a glorious medley of wild beast shows, waxwork exhibitions and wandering thespians, not forgetting the wonderful market with an endless variety of goods from all over the world. The fair stretched along North Parade on both sides of the street, then carried on down Darley Street right to the Bowling Green Hotel on Bridge Street. The Local Leader will be following the rise of North Parade in my photo walkabouts in the next few editions. ..........................................................................................................................................................

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