Online child safety and literacy

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This presentation by Lee Rainie to The Point Smart / Click Safe Summit pulls together Pew Internet Project research about teenagers' online activities, their behavior on social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace, and their Web 2.0 content creation activities. It covers the threats posed by cyberbullying, and stranger contact on the internet. and suggests that a new kind of competence we call "self literacy" is useful in the digital age. 6/10/2008

Published in: Technology, Health & Medicine

Online child safety and literacy

  1. 1. Teenagers’ online safety and literacy Lee Rainie – Director, Pew Internet Project Point Smart / Click Safe Summit June 10, 2008
  2. 2. <ul><li>Five hallmarks of the </li></ul><ul><li>world of digital natives </li></ul>
  3. 3. Hallmark 1 <ul><li>Teens’ internet </li></ul><ul><li>environment is changing and they are becoming more intense users </li></ul>
  4. 4. 2000 73% of teens use internet ~8% with broadband at home <30% own a cell phone ?? connect to internet wirelessly = slow and stationary connections 2008 94% of teens use internet 73% with broadband at home 71% own a cell phone ~70% connect to internet wirelessly = fast and mobile connections Status update: The internet then and now
  5. 5. Teen use of the internet intensifies
  6. 6. Hallmark 2 <ul><li>Content creation is integral to teens’ internet experience </li></ul><ul><li>--- </li></ul><ul><li>64% of teens </li></ul><ul><li>44% of adults </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>58% of online teens have created their own profile on a social network site like MySpace or Facebook </li></ul><ul><li>(it’s the girls!) </li></ul><ul><li>--- </li></ul><ul><li>33% of online adults have such profiles </li></ul>Content creation
  8. 8. <ul><li>47% of teens have uploaded photos to the internet </li></ul><ul><li>---- </li></ul><ul><li>34% of adult users have done this </li></ul>Content creation
  9. 9. <ul><li>39% of online teens share their own creations online, such as artwork, photos, stories, or videos </li></ul><ul><li>---- </li></ul><ul><li>21% of online adults have done this </li></ul>Content creation
  10. 10. <ul><li>28% of teens have blogs – up from 19% in 2004 </li></ul><ul><li>(it’s the girls!) </li></ul><ul><li>---- </li></ul><ul><li>12% of online adults have a blog </li></ul>Content creation
  11. 11. <ul><li>26% of online teens report keeping their own personal webpage </li></ul><ul><li>---- </li></ul><ul><li>14% of online adults have their own page </li></ul>Content creation
  12. 12. Content creation 26% of online teens say they remix content they find online into their own artistic creations ---- 11% of online adults have done this
  13. 13. <ul><li>14% of teens have uploaded videos to the web </li></ul><ul><li>---- </li></ul><ul><li>14% of all adult internet users have done this </li></ul>Content creation
  14. 14. <ul><li>19% of online young adults have created an avatar that interacts with others online </li></ul><ul><li>---- </li></ul><ul><li>6% of all adult internet users have done this </li></ul>Content creation
  15. 15. Hallmark 3 <ul><li>Teens’ are using their digital tools to reshape their communications </li></ul><ul><li>patterns </li></ul>
  16. 16. Source: Pew Internet & American Life Project Teen/Parent Survey on Writing, September-November 2007. Margin of error is ±5%. 16% Send email 23% Send messages through a social networking site 29% Send instant messages 35% Talk on a landline or home phone 35% Talk on a cell phone 36% Send text messages on cell phone 39% Spend time in person outside of school All teens (n=700) % of teens who engage in each activity every day Daily Social Communication Choices
  17. 17. Hallmark 4 <ul><li>Multi-tasking is a way of life </li></ul><ul><li>for teens </li></ul><ul><li>---- </li></ul><ul><li>Many live in a state of “continuous partial attention” </li></ul><ul><li>– Linda Stone </li></ul>
  18. 18. Kaiser Family Foundation, Generation M, March 2005
  19. 19. Kaiser Family Foundation, Generation M, March 2005
  20. 20. Hallmark 5 <ul><li>Teens are facile with technology but many are not yet fully fluent in the new literacies the digital world requires, especially “self literacy” </li></ul>
  21. 21. Update old survival wisdom: Be safe <ul><li>Don’t talk to strangers, especially about sex </li></ul><ul><li>Pew Internet findings: 32% of online teens have been contacted online by a complete stranger. </li></ul><ul><li>Of teens who have been contacted, 23% say they were made scared or uncomfortable by the stranger contact. Overall, 7% of online teens experienced disturbing stranger contact. </li></ul><ul><li>-------------- </li></ul><ul><li>4% of youth received aggressive online sexual solicitation where the solicitor tried to make offline contact; 4% faced solicitation of pictures. </li></ul><ul><li>-- Crimes Against Children Research Center – Univ. of New Hampshire </li></ul>
  22. 22. Update old survival wisdom: Be smart <ul><li>Don’t go into certain virtual neighborhoods </li></ul><ul><li>25% of youth who use the internet regularly had one or more unwanted exposures to sexual pictures while online in the “past year.” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>73% came during surfing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>27% came via email or IM </li></ul></ul><ul><li>-- Crimes Against Children Research Center – Univ. of New Hampshire </li></ul>
  23. 23. Update old survival wisdom: Be skeptical <ul><li>Don’t believe everything you read or everything that someone tells you, especially about themselves </li></ul><ul><li>In the majority of sex crimes against youth, offenders did not deceive the teens about the fact that they were older and were interested in sex. However, the attackers seduced the youth by being understanding, sympathetic and flattering, and by appealing to the teens’ interest in romance, sex and adventure. </li></ul><ul><li>-- Crimes Against Children Research Center – Univ. of New Hampshire </li></ul>
  24. 24. Self literacy: New competency 1 <ul><li>The ability to manage your identity in a way that appropriately takes account of the risks of how online activity can lead to disclosure of sensitive personal information. </li></ul><ul><li>---- </li></ul><ul><li>Beware of online predators, especially information predators! </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t overshare because lots of people AND machines will be watching! </li></ul>
  25. 25. Self literacy: New competency 2 <ul><li>The capacity to give appropriate attention to your online reputation and assign appropriate weight to the words and images about you that appear online </li></ul><ul><li>---- </li></ul><ul><li>How to deal with cyberbullies… </li></ul><ul><li>32% of online teens have been targets of annoying and potentially menacing online activity -- rumors, threats, pictures, disclosing private communications </li></ul>
  26. 26. Self literacy: New competency 3 <ul><li>The skill to be socially successful in navigating the new boundaries of social networks and “friendships.” </li></ul><ul><li>---- </li></ul><ul><li>Friend is now a verb! </li></ul><ul><li>Not everyone friending you can possibly be the truest kind of </li></ul><ul><li>FRIEND </li></ul>
  27. 27. Self literacy: New competency 4 <ul><li>The competence to exercise social intelligence when you can be “present” anywhere, any time to anyone even when you are not physically there. </li></ul><ul><li>---- </li></ul><ul><li>How to have good manners in a world of where multiple audiences can be aware of you … and where “absent present” and “present absence” are new realities. </li></ul>
  28. 28. Thank you! <ul><li>Lee Rainie </li></ul><ul><li>Director </li></ul><ul><li>Pew Internet & American Life Project </li></ul><ul><li>1615 L Street NW </li></ul><ul><li>Suite 700 </li></ul><ul><li>Washington, DC 20036 </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>202-419-4500 </li></ul>

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