How Communities Learn

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Lee Rainie explores the role of social networks – the technological kind as well as the real-world kind – in shaping the way people gather community information and make sense of it.

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How Communities Learn

  1. 1. How communities learn<br />Lee Rainie, Director, Pew Internet Project<br />6.9.11<br />Black Hills Knowledge Network<br />Email: Lrainie@pewinternet.org<br />Twitter: @Lrainie<br />
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  3. 3. New learning environment<br />Speed, availability, searchability of information<br />New kinds of participatory knowledge creation – rearrangement of expertise<br />Reallocation of attention<br />Importance of social networks<br />Elevation of new literacies<br />
  4. 4. 4<br />New kind of learners<br />More self directed and better prepared to capture new information inputs<br />More reliant on feedback and response<br />More attuned to group-based knowledge<br />More open to cross discipline insights, creating their own “tagged” taxonomies<br />More oriented towards people being their own individual nodes of production<br />
  5. 5. New media ecology-- Knight Commission on Information Needs of Communities<br />Quality journalism through local newspapers, local television and radio stations, and online sources<br />A local government with a committed policy on transparency<br />Citizens with effective opportunities to have their voices heard and to affect public policy<br />Ready access to information that enhances quality of life, including information provided by trusted intermediary organizations in the community on a variety of subjects<br />
  6. 6. High speed internet available to all citizens<br />Local schools with computer and high-speed internet access, as well as curricula that support digital and media literacy <br />A vibrant public library, or other public center for information that provides digital resources and professional assistance<br />A majority of government information and services online, accessible through a central and easy to use portal<br />New media ecology-- Knight Commission on Information Needs of Communities<br />
  7. 7. Revolution #1 Internet and Broadband<br />7<br />
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  9. 9. 70% <br />66% <br />
  10. 10. Broadband adoption by community type<br />
  11. 11. Home b-band South Dakota = 60%<br />
  12. 12. Consequences for info ecosystem<br />Explosion of creators and niches<br />
  13. 13. Networked creators among internet users<br /><ul><li>65% are social networking site users
  14. 14. 55% share photos
  15. 15. 37% contribute rankings and ratings
  16. 16. 33% create content tags
  17. 17. 30% share personal creations
  18. 18. 26% post comments on sites and blogs
  19. 19. 15% have personal website
  20. 20. 15% are content remixers
  21. 21. 14% are bloggers
  22. 22. 13% use Twitter
  23. 23. 6% location services – 9% allow location awareness from social media </li></li></ul><li>Revolution #2 Wireless Connectivity<br />14<br />
  24. 24. Cell phone owners – 85% adults<br />96% <br />90% <br />85% <br />58% <br />Urban-84% Suburban-86% Rural-77%<br />
  25. 25. Mobile internet connectors – 57% adults<br />62% <br />59% <br />55% <br />Urban-60% Suburban-60% Rural-43%<br />
  26. 26. Cell phones as connecting tools<br />% of cell owners<br />64% send photo or video<br />Post video 25% <br />55% access social net. site<br />30% watch a video <br />11% have purchased a product<br />11% charitable donation by text <br />60% (Twitter users) access Twitter<br />2/22/2011<br />17<br />
  27. 27. 1 in 4 adults use apps<br />All adults<br />85% use cell phones<br />35% have apps<br />24% use apps<br />May 2010 and Nov 2010 surveys <br />
  28. 28. 56% of adults own laptops – <br />up from 30% in 2006<br />52% of adults own DVRs – <br />up from 3% in 2002<br />44% of adults own MP3 players – <br />up from 11% in 2005<br />42% of adults own game consoles<br />12% of adults own e-book readers - Kindle<br />8% of adults own tablet computer - iPad<br />
  29. 29. Revolution #3<br />Social Networking <br />20<br />
  30. 30. The social networking population is more diverse than you might think<br />Urban-64% Suburban-65% Rural-49%<br />5x<br />5x<br />7x<br />5x<br />2/22/2011<br />21<br />
  31. 31. Why South Dakota so high?<br />
  32. 32. What does this mean for learning?<br />1) Social networks are more influential as …<br />Sentries<br />
  33. 33. What does this mean for learning?<br />2) Social networks are more influential as …<br />Evaluators<br />
  34. 34. What does this mean for learning?<br />3) Social networks are more influential as …<br />Audience<br />
  35. 35. - screen literacy - graphics and symbols<br /> - navigation literacy<br /> - connections and context literacy<br /> - skepticism<br />- value of contemplative time<br /> - how to create content/knowledge<br /> - personal information literacy<br /> - ethical behavior in new world<br />June 25, 2010<br />26<br />What does this mean for learning? 4) New literacies are required<br />
  36. 36. “Information needs of communities” - -- Knight Commission 2009<br />Attributes<br />Maximize the availability of relevant and credible information<br />Strengthen the capacity of individuals to engage with information<br />Promote individual engagement with information and the public life of the community<br />
  37. 37. Understanding a Community Information Ecosystem<br />Infrastructure:<br /><ul><li>Media
  38. 38. Internet
  39. 39. Libraries</li></ul>Skills:<br /><ul><li>Individuals’ Ability to Access Information
  40. 40. Individuals’ Ability to Exchange Information
  41. 41. Government’s Ability to Exchange Information</li></ul>Supply:<br /><ul><li>Community News and Events
  42. 42. Quality of Life Information
  43. 43. Government Services and Information</li></li></ul><li>Revolution #4 <br />Post PC, new interfaces, better search, local awareness, social graph<br />29<br />
  44. 44. Revolution #5 <br />Internet of things, <br />big data<br />30<br />
  45. 45. Thank you!<br />Questions?<br />

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