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As learning goes mobile - Educause

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Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, spoke about “As learning goes mobile” at the Educause 2011 annual conference. More: http://pewinternet.org/Presentations/2011/Oct/Educase-2011.aspx

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As learning goes mobile - Educause

  1. As learning goes mobile Lee Rainie, Director, Pew Internet Project 10.20.11 Educause - Philadelphia Email: [email_address] Twitter: @Lrainie
  2. Anti-executive summary <ul><li>Which textbook company stocks to buy or dump? (Who’ll do the ebooks thing best?) </li></ul><ul><li>Are students’ attention spans shorter now? </li></ul><ul><li>Are students’ brains being rewired? </li></ul><ul><li>Are students more narcissistic and more indifferent to privacy? </li></ul><ul><li>What’s the matter with kids today? </li></ul>(Or… Questions I cannot answer)
  3. What I think I know about the rise of mobile learning <ul><li>Mobile connectivity is changing social and information spaces by enhancing/enabling … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>New access points to knowledge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Real-time information sharing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Just-in-time searches </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Perpetual, pervasive awareness of social networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Augmented reality </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ubiquitous small screens are changing attention and media zones (including text-based media!) </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile connectivity is changing public and private space/time continuum </li></ul><ul><li>New kinds of learners are emerging in dig. environ. </li></ul>
  4. Digital Revolution 1 Internet (78%) and Broadband at home (62%) 64% 62%
  5. Networked creators among internet users <ul><li>65% are social networking site users </li></ul><ul><li>55% share photos </li></ul><ul><li>37% contribute rankings and ratings </li></ul><ul><li>33% create content tags </li></ul><ul><li>30% share personal creations </li></ul><ul><li>26% post comments on sites and blogs </li></ul><ul><li>15% have personal website </li></ul><ul><li>15% are content remixers </li></ul><ul><li>14% are bloggers </li></ul><ul><li>13% use Twitter </li></ul><ul><li>6% location services – 9% allow location awareness from social media – 23% maps etc. </li></ul>
  6. Consequences for learning ecosystem <ul><li>Volume </li></ul>Velocity Valence / Relevance
  7. Digital Revolution 2 Social networking – 50% of all adults
  8. Social networks and social media become more important in people’s learning strategies Consequences for learning ecosystem
  9. What does this mean? <ul><li>1) Social networks are more influential and are differently segmented and layered </li></ul>Sentries
  10. What does this mean? Evaluators 1) Social networks are more influential and are differently segmented and layered
  11. What does this mean? <ul><li>1) Social networks are more influential and are differently segmented and layered </li></ul>Audience = New media are the new neighborhood
  12. Digital Revolution 3 Mobile – 84% 327.6 Total U.S. population: 315.5 million
  13. 56% of adults own laptops – up from 30% in 2006 44% of adults own MP3 players – up from 11% in 2005 52% of adults own DVRs – up from 3% in 2002 42% of adults own game consoles 12% of adults own e-book readers - Kindle 9% of adults own tablet computer - iPad
  14. 35% own “smartphones”
  15. Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, April 26-May 22, 2011 Tracking Survey. N=2,277 adults 18 and older, including 755 reached via cell phone.
  16. Mobile internet connectors – 63% adults
  17. Connected college students Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project 2010 tracking surveys. All include landline and cell phone interviews. N for all adults=9,769; n for 18-24 year old non-students=717; n for four-year undergrads=246, n for grad students=112, n for community college students=164.
  18. 25% of smartphone owners use it as primary device to go online All smartphone owners (n=688) 25% Gender Men (n=349) 24 Women (n=339) 26 Age 18-29 (n=177) 42 30-49 (n=256) 21 50+ (n=240) 10 Race/Ethnicity White, non-Hispanic (n=417) 17 Black/Latino(n=206) 38 Household Income Less than $30,000 (n=131) 40 $30,000-$49,999 (n=118) 29 $50,000+ (n=334) 17 Education level High school grad (n=169) 33 Some college (n=171) 27 College grad (n=308) 13
  19. Cell phone activities
  20. Interesting tidbit: 17% of American adult cell phones owners have bumped into another person or an object because they were distracted by talking or texting on their phones. Cell phone activities
  21. 84% use cell phones 35% have apps 24% use apps All adults May 2010 and Nov 2010 surveys 1 in 4 adults use apps
  22. Uses of apps <ul><li>Popular apps </li></ul><ul><li>Games </li></ul><ul><li>News/weather </li></ul><ul><li>Maps </li></ul><ul><li>Social networking </li></ul><ul><li>Music </li></ul><ul><li>Entertainment/food </li></ul><ul><li>Banking </li></ul><ul><li>Sports </li></ul><ul><li>Shopping </li></ul><ul><li>Movies </li></ul><ul><li>Top apps functions </li></ul><ul><li>Info updates </li></ul><ul><li>Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Learn about interests </li></ul><ul><li>Destinations </li></ul><ul><li>Work tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Purchases </li></ul><ul><li>Extra info about event </li></ul><ul><li>Health </li></ul>
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  25. <ul><li>Back to the four things that I think I know </li></ul>
  26. <ul><li>Mobile connectivity is changing social and information spaces by enhancing/enabling: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>New access points to knowledge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>E-books and the cloud </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Conversation starter for internet use and chatter </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Real-time information sharing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Opportunism and pain avoidance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ Hyper-coordination” of group activities </li></ul></ul></ul>
  27. <ul><li>Mobile connectivity is changing social and information spaces by enhancing/enabling: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Just-in-time searches </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>New “smarts” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>New cognition </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Perpetual, pervasive awareness/access to social networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Deeper connection and consultation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Incentive “to network” via social media </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Augmented reality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Merger of real world and data </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>New kinds of learning amplification </li></ul></ul></ul>
  28. <ul><ul><li>Continuous partial attention in “streams” </li></ul></ul>2. Ubiquitous small screens are changing attention and media zones (including text-based media!)
  29. <ul><ul><li>Immersive experiences and deep dives </li></ul></ul>2. Ubiquitous small screens are changing attention and media zones (including text-based media!)
  30. <ul><ul><li>Info-snacking </li></ul></ul>2. Ubiquitous small screens are changing attention and media zones (including text-based media!)
  31. <ul><ul><li>Day dreaming </li></ul></ul>2. Ubiquitous small screens are changing attention and media zones (including text-based media!)
  32. <ul><li>3. Mobile connectivity is changing public and private space/time continuum </li></ul>Anywhere Any device Any time Alone together
  33. <ul><li>4. New kinds of learners are emerging in the digital environment </li></ul><ul><li>More self directed, less top-down </li></ul><ul><li>Better arrayed to capture new information inputs </li></ul><ul><li>More reliant on feedback and response </li></ul><ul><li>More inclined to collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>More open to cross discipline insights and creating their own “tagged” taxonomies </li></ul><ul><li>More oriented towards people being their own individual nodes of production </li></ul>
  34. What is the future of knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process Knowledge is objective and certain Old: Learning as transaction Knowledge is subjective and provisional
  35. What is the future of knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process Learners receive knowledge Old: Learning as transaction Learners create knowledge
  36. What is the future of knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process Knowledge is organized in stable, hierarchical structures that can be treated independently of one another Old: Learning as transaction Knowledge is organized “ecologically”-disciplines are integrative and interactive
  37. What is the future of knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process We learn best passively, by listening and watching Old: Learning as transaction We learn best actively doing and managing our own learning
  38. What is the future of knowledge? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process Our “intelligence” is based on our individual abilities Old: Learning as transaction Our “intelligence” is based on our learning communities
  39. Be not afraid

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