The State of Digital Marketing in the Networked Age

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Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project, discusses the Project’s latest research about internet use, mobile connectivity, and social media, and what the findings mean for marketers. He will explore how "networked information" has very different characteristics from "industrial era media" and why this has profound implications for the way marketers gain attention for their messages and interact with their audiences.

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The State of Digital Marketing in the Networked Age

  1. 1. PewInternet.org The State of Digital Marketing in the Networked Age Mid-Atlantic Marketing Summit - Baltimore September 19, 2013 Lee Rainie: Director, Pew Internet Project Email: Lrainie@pewinternet.org Twitter: @Lrainie
  2. 2. The new media ecosystem and the Navy Yard shootings 9.16.13
  3. 3. Tweets start: 8:21 a.m.
  4. 4. Multiple Hashtags created: 8:42 a.m.
  5. 5. Pictures start emerging: 9:00 a.m.
  6. 6. …. And videos with commentary
  7. 7. Personal tweets give way to news media tweets: Late morning
  8. 8. Live feeds from first responder scanners
  9. 9. “I’m fine” sites
  10. 10. People finder sites get used
  11. 11. Crowdsourcing the investigation …
  12. 12. … but it was shut down this time
  13. 13. Large amount of personal testimony and reaction
  14. 14. Memorials arise
  15. 15. The new arc of breaking news Hong Ku – Visiting Fellow Nieman Journalism Lab working on an app to help journalists discover news on Twitter
  16. 16. Networked individualism and the triple revolution
  17. 17. Digital Revolution 1: Broadband at home - 70% (+10% more have smartphones) - Internet users overall: 85% 3% 70% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% June 2000 April 2001 March 2002 March 2003 April 2004 March 2005 March 2006 March 2007 April 2008 April 2009 May 2010 Aug 2011 April 2012 May 2013 Dial-up Broadband
  18. 18. Impact on marketing • More volume, velocity, and variety of information • New pathways to customers • Rise of “fifth estate” of civic and community actors (including citizen “vigilantes”) – harder to control message • More arguments • Collapsed contexts of messaging
  19. 19. Digital Revolution 2 Mobile – 91% … smartphone 56% … tablets 34% 326.4 Total U.S. population: 319 million 2012
  20. 20. Changes in smartphone ownership 35% 48% 17% 46% 41% 12% 56% 35% 9% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Smartphone Other cell phone No cell phone May 2011 February 2012 May 2013
  21. 21. • Attention zones change – “Continuous partial attention” – Deep dives – Info snacking • Real-time, just-in-time searches and availability change process of acquiring and using information – Spontaneous activities – Be “ready for your closeup” • Augmented reality & localized information highlight the merger of data world and real world Impact on marketing
  22. 22. Digital Revolution 3 Social networking – 61% of all adults % of internet users 9% 89% 7% 78% 6% 60% 1% 43% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 18-29 30-49 50-64 65+
  23. 23. The Landscape of Social Media Users (among adults) % of internet users who…. The service is especially appealing to Use Any Social Networking Site 72% Adults ages 18-29, women Use Facebook 69% Women, adults ages 18-29 Use Google+ 31% Higher educated LinkedIn 20% Adults ages 30-64, higher income, higher educated Use Twitter 18% Adults ages 18-29, African-Americans, urban residents Use Pinterest 15% Women, adults under 50, whites, those with some college education Use Instagram 13% Adults ages 18-29, African-Americans, Latinos, women, urban residents Use Tumblr 6% Adults ages 18-29 reddit 6% Men ages 18-29
  24. 24. • Composition and character of people’s social networks changes AND networks become important channels of … – discovery & learning – trust – influence • Organizations can become media companies themselves … • … and “helper nodes” in people’s networks Impact on marketing
  25. 25. • More demands for transparency Final thoughts • More attempts at hacking, breaking and entering, and messing with you
  26. 26. Thank you!

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