Parts to be Added
List of concerns from Fall Design Review and how we addressed or plan on
addressing them
    Faculty co...
 Due to the fact that the RFID lap tracking system uses a fixed lap
                    distance and the measured time to...
The goal of the study was to determine the usable range of the Radio Frequency
Identification (RFID) antenna and the maxim...
2”



                                 (1/2)L




                                 (1/2)L




                            ...
Datalogger. A comparison of the heart rate data will determine the accuracy of the Polar
b1 heart rate monitor.

   Heart...
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Parts to be Added.doc

  1. 1. Parts to be Added List of concerns from Fall Design Review and how we addressed or plan on addressing them  Faculty concerns to be addressed later by our team: o How will the FIT System deal with the issue of the last lap?  Will allow the user a choice to delete it. o Look into using a 2 electrode heart rate system instead of a 3 electrode system.  This is no longer an issue due to the purchased heart rate monitor. o Look into using conductive rubber electrodes for the heart rate monitor  This is no longer an issue due to the purchased heart rate monitor. o Must TEST how perspiration changes the electrode conductivity.  This is no longer an issue because the heart rate monitor was purchased.  Polar does recommend pre-moistening the chest strap prior to each workout with saline solution or electrode gel. o Sterilization  Sweat inhibits bacterial growth (due to its salt content), therefore, this is probably not a big issue.  Users will be asked to wipe down the chest strap after use (same as current Kern center equipment policy).  Due to the low cost ($6.95), each user will be encouraged to buy their own elastic strap (for sanitation and sizing reasons). • This cost may even be cheaper if it is possible to buy the elastic straps in bulk and re-sell them to the users at the Kern Center. o Look into the effects that Magnetic fields may have on people.  Based on prior research, it is believed that magnetic fields produced by the RFID system will not cause any harm to people.  The FIT System team will be doing research on this to verify this hypothesis. o How are the amplifiers in the FIT System going to be powered?  RFID Amplifier • For the RFID Amplifier, for a proof of concept, the power supply from Tech Support at MSOE will be used. • The RFID Amplifier could be powered by the power supply listed in the Budget section of this report for an additional 150 dollars.  HR Monitor amplifiers • Heart rate monitor amplifiers are no longer being used, but all components of the purchased heart rate monitor system use standard watch batteries, which are replaceable. o Address issues involved in lane changes.
  2. 2.  Due to the fact that the RFID lap tracking system uses a fixed lap distance and the measured time to calculate speed of the lap, intralap lane changes could easily become an issue. • The first solution to this is that each user will be instructed to stay in lane one. This will work because the FIT System is not being used for a competition. • All users will be informed that if they do change lanes during their lap, the distance traveled will be slightly inaccurate, causing their speed to also be inaccurate. (both inaccuracies should be negligible). o Can you simultaneously read two different RFID tags?  The 13.56 MHz antenna/reader will allow two tags to be read simultaneously.  It takes 20ms to read a tag • This was tested, and it was determined that no runner could possibly close the following distance of a foot or two in 20ms. Therefore, this is a mute point. o Calculate how many people can be in the antenna at the same time.  People can’t run two side-by-side in one lane, and it takes more than 20ms to close the gap between two runners one behind the other.  We will instruct users not to pass each other for at least 3 feet before and after the antenna. • This distance was verified through testing to find the readable area of the antenna. See the System Component Testing section of this paper for further details. Business Student Collaboration Results During the Fall of 2006 the FIT System team collaborated with a group of MSOE business students. The business collaboration led to an understanding of how the FIT System could be made more marketable. The business team provided the idea of marketing the FIT System on several different levels: the primary level would include only basic parts of the system, and increasing levels would increase the complexity and cost of the overall system leading up to the complete system with the main program, RFID system, heart rate monitoring system, and large display screen. Note about funding Thorough research and application has not yielded any funding from companies or grants. All of the necessary FIT System components have been purchased, and the team is currently applying for reimbursement from the Keen Grant. System Component Testing Determination of Readable range of the RFID antenna and the maximum readable speed. ABSTRACT
  3. 3. The goal of the study was to determine the usable range of the Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) antenna and the maximum speed at which the transponder must cross the antenna’s range. First, the transponder was slowly moved in the three- dimensional space surrounding the horizontal antenna in order to determine the range of readability for a stationary transponder. Then, the antenna was placed on the floor in a horizontal position and a pendulum was swung over it in a variety of positions at different speeds in order to determine the maximum swing speed at which the transponder could be detected. PROCEDURE In order to determine the usable range of the antenna, the reader was first connected to the antenna and power supply as shown in FIGURE 1. The range in the vertical dimension was determined by bracing the antenna on top of two poster paper easels. The transponder was dragged along the paper from top to bottom, until the reader no longer detected it. Once the transponder was no longer detected, a point was drawn on the paper. Five points were drawn for each side that the antenna was resting on. Then, the easels were moved closer to each other such that the antenna was still centered about it. The process of detecting readability and drawing points was repeated. Then, the poster paper was placed horizontally and the antenna was placed on top of it. The transponder was dragged along the two-dimensional plane of the antenna in order to detect readability and the points were marked as before. Matlab will be used to enter the data in order to create a diagram indicating the three-dimensional range of readability of the reader. Power Supply RFID Reader RFID Transponder RFID Antenna FIGURE 1: Set-up of RFID Reader and Antenna to Determine Range of Readability In order to determine the maximum allowable swing speed of the transponder, the antenna was placed on the floor and the pendulum was swung above it such that when the pendulum was not moving, the transponder was 22 inches above the antenna. Four different pendulum orientations were used, as shown in FIGURE 2.
  4. 4. 2” (1/2)L (1/2)L 2” (1/2)W (1/2)W Case A Case B Case C Case D FIGURE 2: Pendulum Position and Swing Direction with Respect to Antenna for Four Cases A video camera was used to record the pendulum swings. For each case, three swings were obtained in which the transponder was read by the reader and one case was obtained in which the reader did not detect the transponder. Video software will be used to determine the velocities of each of the swings in order to determine the best position of the antenna and the maximum allowable swing speed. RESULTS Future Experiment plans Heart rate Monitor The heart rate monitor and Datalogger have both been activated and found to be operating correctly. Future testing of the heart rate monitor must be completed to determine the range limitations because Polar does not publish the range of the b1 heart rate monitor. Therefore, the first test will involve attaching the chest strap (by using electrodes) to a function generator with a proper attenuator set so that reasonable human EKG traces can be simulated and controlled. Through this experimental setup, the minimum and maximum readable heart rates will be tested. The amplitude and bandwidth limitations of the Polar b1 will be tested to determine the upper and lower signal amplitude limits by testing the levels at which the heart rate output appears erratic or flaky. Finally, the accuracy of the heart rate monitor will be tested by simultaneously connecting a subject to a standard 3-lead EKG and the Polar b1 chest strap. The EKG will be recorded using Biopac, and the Polar b1 data will be recorded using the
  5. 5. Datalogger. A comparison of the heart rate data will determine the accuracy of the Polar b1 heart rate monitor.  Heart rate monitor o Test accuracy by comparing the monitor’s results to Biopac o Attach to self  Check placement limitations o Use function generator with attenuator  Possibly attach electrodes to the strap (using ECG electrodes)  Do slow rate and fast rate and see what rate it won’t capture anymore • Basically self-test the limitations (bandwidth)  Check the amplitude limitations (what are the upper and lower signal amplitude limits?) • Where does it get erratic or flaky for HR  RFID o Pendulum test to check the maximum speed that the reader can still pick up

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