Morning Session on Social Media

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Morning Session on Social Media

  1. 1. Social Media Marketing, Practical Use, Reputation Management Dr. Jim Humphries Adjunct Professor Media and Communications Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine Founder: Veterinary News Network American Society of Veterinary Journalists Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  2. 2. Many Thanks To Ceva Animal Health For Sponsoring This Unique Presentation! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  3. 3. Our Goals Today: First Hour: Traditional Media and How Social Media Changes The Game Second Hour: Practical Side of Social Media Third Hour: Some “button pushing” Fourth Hour: Reputation Management Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  4. 4. Communications: • • • • • Media Public Internet Personal Client Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  5. 5. Some must be very short Some much longer Dependent Upon: 1. The Message 2. The Audience 3. The Method Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  6. 6. A Crash Course In Media Interactions (Traditional and On-Line) Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  7. 7. Television “video”  Content Is King!  Broadcast TV is great  Emerging media is morphing that.  On-Line and mobile video viewing is way up!  Video will always work!  You should learn basic video production skills  Animal stories highly popular  They are visual / newsworthy / entertaining. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  8. 8. Radio  Reaches huge audience  Satellite Radio giving radio new Life!  Weekly On-Line Radio Audience Sharply Up 17%  Average person spends 21 hours each week.  81% of all Adults listen to radio in the car each week  Talk Radio has LOTS of time to fill!!  Easy to do! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  9. 9. Print Media  Much electronic media comes from print  Half of Americans read print news daily  Print companies finding new media strategy  Citizen journalists: blogging  Can be done when you have the time (stored)  Can be re-purposed; clients / site / blogs Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  10. 10. NEW Media! Why The Explosion? Today we SEEK news/information, rather than wait! Technology is wildly popular 60% believe traditional media does not report facts or are biased! Only 39% Trust Today’s Media Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  12. 12. NEW Media How Has It Changed Regular Media? Pushed Traditional into a “New” approach More responsive Smaller stories get a look Audience input - immediate Evens playing field – citizen journalists Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  13. 13. To Be Effective: • Courage / Desire • Preparation / Rehearsal • Leads to Confidence • Understand their side • To have a good story • To be “easy” to produce Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  14. 14. Keep in Mind: • • • • • • • Remember news is happening NOW News is VISUAL News is information and entertaining News has an EDGE Local news is LOCAL News Producers are very pressed for time Be Quick! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  15. 15. Television • Not everyone is cut out for TV • BE up-beat, fun and entertaining • Practice your performance in advance so you don’t ramble. • Make your points then STOP. • Be ready to answer “off point” questions, then “bridge” back to your main message. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  16. 16. Radio • • • • • ENERGY! ENTERTAINMENT CONTROVERSY INFORMATION! A CALL TO ACTION Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  17. 17. News People Are: • Ignorant of your issues • In a huge hurry – driven by deadlines • Rarely have underlying agenda • Don’t usually want too much detail • Like the negative or sensational • They are skeptical and probing • Think in sound bites or headlines • Not your friends • Not your enemies • They are a tool you use correctly Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  18. 18. Therefore You Must: • Think in sound bites and headlines • Speak only in concise rehearsed bites • Deliver information so that it is “consumable” • Give them an up-beat “performance” • Make your schedule flex to theirs • Help them do their job • Afterwards - offer lots of resources (why are some better than others?) Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  19. 19. How Can We Be Successful? • Understand the media business • Learn the skills they need from you • Practice the skills • Don’t be shy about calling them • Become a valuable “source” • Keep contacts up-to-date • Help them with stories unrelated to your work • Thank them • Send them story ideas Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  20. 20. Sell Them The Story The Media Is A Tool! Using the media is the process of supplying them information that you don’t control in hopes that they will run your story for their audiences. Some call it “earned media”. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  21. 21. To be effective and trusted, you must provide them a steady stream of interesting, newsworthy stories that reporters and editors want to run – with few adjustments. www.MyVNN.com Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  22. 22. How Do We Use Media For Marketing? Earned Vs. Paid Exposure Local daily, weekly, monthly paper Coupons, Ads, Events… Guest appearances Newsworthy stories, contests, Become media source Regular apperances Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  23. 23. What Makes A Good Story? • Something that is happening NOW • HOT stories • The local angle on national news • A seasonal event • An unusual case • The results of a new survey • A new product or service that will benefit people • “How to” stories • Things that make people’s lives easier • Local happenings • Good causes • Controversial issues • Government approval of something new Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  24. 24. How Do We React To Media? Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  27. 27. You are asked to do a media interview… 1.What do you do? 2.How do you prepare? 3.What do you say? 4.Your position? 5.What impact will this have? 6.Should you say no? Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  28. 28. 1) Meet The Reporters Needs 2) Get Your Point Across Keep in Mind: Your reason for being there? Your PR goal? Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  29. 29. Reacting Properly – Ask Some Questions: • • • • • • Why have they called you? How did this story come to their attention? Who else are they interviewing? What is the news of the day? What type of show is this? What impact will this have on your practice, the association or the profession? • Can you have some time to prepare? • Do you know the reporter from their work on the air? • Will they come to you or do they need you in-studio? Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  30. 30. What Do They Want? • Is this interview soft or hard? • Will this interview be controversial or general care? • Do they want short answers or extensive answers? • Is this print or electronic media? • Do I have to do this immediately, or do I have some notice? • The angle or their “take” on the story • What are their needs – then try to meet them Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  31. 31. Things To Remember! • You do NOT have to agree to an interview • You do not have to agree to their terms • Reporters are neither your enemy nor your friend • Reporters are driven by deadlines, in a hurry, not interested in too much detail, like negative or sensational things, are skeptical and probing! • Stay with the subject at hand Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  32. 32. - Deep Breath Now Prepare….. • Anticipate the questions you will receive • Write 7-15 second answers. Craft them! • Practice out loud with help • Be sure to practice your answers “out of order” • Practice getting your points in early! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  33. 33. Here is how you do that: • Write down all questions you can think of • Write down all the answers • Craft Your Message Points from these answers • Identify Some Good Bridging Statements • List Some Positive Points You’d Like To Bridge To Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  34. 34. Here’s what that looks like: Q: Why do you vets still consider pets “property” instead of sentient beings? A: First let me say veterinarians must abide by state law. It is the state law that determines the legal status of animals. I personally believe pets are very special, but we cannot step outside of the law in when using words that have deeper legal meaning. MP: Remember, simply changing words, or classifications of our pets, does not mean that care will improve! Bridge: The good news in this issue is… Positive: Veterinary medicine today provides the best medical and surgical care for our pets. We at Riverside Animal Hospital are proud of the care we deliver every day. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  35. 35. The Perfect Answer: Answer or Deflect… Perhaps a Positive Statement  Bridge  Message Point  Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  36. 36. A Practical Overview Of Social Media Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  40. 40. Oh There Are More!! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  42. 42. What Social Media Is NOT… A quick path to success Something for someone else to do An immediate increase of new clients A foolproof way to market your practice A “set it and forget it” way… A replacement for other publicity Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  43. 43. Don’t believe that Social Media is a fix for bad client service… Without a well run, client friendly practice and staff, social media can be a real double edged sword. In fact, social media can allow an upset client to reach thousands before they leave your parking lot! . That will kill you. Focus on outstanding client service and people will sing your praises – Online and OFF-line.
  44. 44. What Social Media IS… An inexpensive and easy way to target clients and potential clients in your area A way to create a positive first impression about you, your hospital – before they even meet you! Social Media allows you to earn a reputation as a caring expert An interactive, dynamic and high-tech tool that enables you to educate and motivate clients Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  45. 45. What Social Media IS… Your website and/or blogs Review sites (Yelp) Comments on news stories/articles Networking sites (Facebook, Twitter, Linked In) Video sites (YouTube, Vimeo) Forums Which social tool reaches the audience that is best for you? Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  46. 46. Authenticity and Transparency These two terms are important concepts for success in any social media interaction or outreach – Authenticity: When what you believe and what you are saying are the same thing. “Walking the Walk” – Transparency: Honesty, even in difficult situations – Be Who You Are: with your voice! – Don’t OUTSOURCE this important job! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  47. 47. Success in social media is NOT measured by the number of “fans”, “followers” or “likes” Success is measured by the quality of the community Engagement occurs when other people like and share your content, widening your audience Don’t OUTSOURCE this important job! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  48. 48. Websites • Beautiful & Simple • Image and Impression • FUNCTIONALITY: Flash rotator Map & hours Services Virtual tour Staff Photos! Appointments Rx refills Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network Library Few Links Testimonials Logos Emergencies Boarding & Grooming After care instructions
  49. 49. Recommendations InFront: Based in Colorado Springs. They host our Veterinary News Network site, and our Mobile PetDocs site. VetNetwork: New Hampshire. Owned by Dr. Mark Feltz, veterinarian. They host the site for the American Society of Veterinary Journalists (www.asvj.org) VetLearn, VetMatrix Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  53. 53. Final note on websites Remember…this is your HOME. • Proof-read and triple check all content for spelling errors, bad grammar and mistakes. • Double check all links and navigation • Keep the pages fresh, especially the home page. Don’t let months go by without updating the home page. i.e. Pet food recall information still on some veterinary websites! Per VetLearn…54% of practices updates their site a few times a year or NEVER!! Phone Number “Above The Fold” Please! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  54. 54. Example of what not to do Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  55. 55. Example of what not to do Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  58. 58.          Founded in 2004 Easy sign up, use and navigation Currently the largest social network (>1 Billion!) More than ½ log on every day! Very informal, social, friendly Can be used for Marketing, Education Relationship building (personal or business) Sort of a huge High School Reunion! Should have a Personal Profile and a Business Page! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  59. 59. You Personally Have A “Profile” You Have “Friends” Your Business Has A “Page” You Build “Likes” Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  60. 60. Facebook Profile • • • • • • Personal use Connect with family, friends Share things you “like” Build “Friends” Even be outspoken or political It is NOT the Business You! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  61. 61. Profile Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  62. 62. “Pages” Facebook offers “Pages” as the method for businesses to connect with the world. Don’t set up your business as a “profile”. A Facebook page can be a powerful tool for any practice, association, school, or nonprofit. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  63. 63. Facebook (Business) Page • For business, groups, non-profits, artists, etc • Educate, interact and engage with clients. • Allow clients come to know you by your posts and interactions • Build “Likes” Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  70. 70. What To Put On Your Page Clients “like” your page because they are interested in you and your hospital! Anything that would be interesting to clients:        Interesting cases Photos / Videos Your Blog Posts What you are doing for the community Fun Facts about Pets Share other interesting business pages Make sure your Page is connected to your website! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  71. 71. Warning! A Facebook Page does NOT replace your website!      Facebook will always “own” the page and can remove it at any time, without warning Facebook’s platform, although powerful, is limited. Not easy to explain complex issues or topics. Facebook is the “party”, your practice website is HOME! Focus on bringing people to your home on the web Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  72. 72. A House Build On Many Supports! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  73. 73. Best Practices for A Facebook Page?   Many practices get frustrated with lack of interaction and engagement on their page The BIGGEST reasons that Facebook pages don’t grow or fail to engage are:  Too many posts daily  Too much marketing  Posts are too long or too infrequent  Lack of interaction from page. Therefore, be Interactive! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  74. 74. Important Concepts To Remember!      More than 95% of people who “like” your page will never return to it!  That’s not a bad thing…they are simply viewing your posts via their NewsFeed Your posts must show up in their NewsFeed before any interaction can occur. BUT…30 BILLION pieces of content are shared on Facebook every month!! How can you make sure your posts are being seen? Understand: FACEBOOK EDGERANK Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  75. 75. Understanding EdgeRank  Facebook looks at each piece of content as an “object” and the interactions between that object and the end user is called an “edge”  In simple terms, the more interaction between the end user and your Facebook page, the higher the Edgerank. Higher Edgeranks lead to a greater probability of the post being seen by the end user.  Types of posts (Video, photo, links) are also weighed, and also the age of the post. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  76. 76. Making Facebook work… Less is more! – Posting constantly will cause people to view you as spam. Consider 2-5 posts weekly or 1-2 posts per day as a good benchmark for success. Less is still more! – LONG postings do not get read! Keep your posts and updates to about 80 – 120 characters and you will increase your interactions. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  77. 77. Making Facebook work… Vary the types of postings you create. Don’t just focus on status updates (“We love taking care of your pets”) or links. • Try including pictures of interesting cases • Video • Sample questions When posting links, use the full link, not the shortened link generated by many third party apps. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  78. 78. Making Facebook work… Consider the time you are posting. According to Buddy Media, pages that posted after normal business hours saw a 20% increase in engagement Thursdays and Fridays often show a higher level of engagement compared to other days, but this could be skewed by type of industry. Take home? Research your own Insights results. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  79. 79. Making Facebook work… Even though third party apps make life a little easier and more efficient for us, Facebook does not rank those posts as high as manual posts. • So…try to make at least 1-2 of your daily postings directly on Facebook rather than using TweetDeck or HootSuite. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  80. 80. Important reminders: Staff involvement should be encouraged, but monitored • • • If staff members “like” the page (and why wouldn’t they?), encourage interaction but set ground rules • Staff personal profiles should be set to strict privacy settings. (next slide shows why!) Explain and enforce client confidentiality Get ideas from staff! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  81. 81. Is this what you want your clients seeing when they visit your staff member’s profile? Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  82. 82. Important reminders: Marketing should only be done on rare occasions. • • • People don’t like to be “sold to” in social media. Keep marketing efforts to a minimum on Facebook page (80/20) However…there are good examples of this working… Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  83. 83. Other Facebook Steps: Take advantage of the “Post as Page” feature! • Instead of posting comments on other Pages as you, post as your hospital! • Look for pet related pages in your area, the local Chamber of Commerce, TV and radio stations, etc. • Remember, focus on adding to the conversation, not necessarily marketing yourself or your hospital. • You can change the “default” setting when posting on your own page. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  84. 84. Use Facebook as Page Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  87. 87. You can change your voice here Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  88. 88. Facebook Ads • Facebook Ads • Targeted Marketing to pet lovers in your area! • People who like your page (and THEIR friends) are significantly more likely to spend more money with you than the general population (Time Magazine, Aug 2012) • Choose cost per click, cost per impression or allow Facebook to budget for you Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  89. 89. Promoted Posts Fairly new to Facebook (2012) Businesses, and now even individuals, can pay to promote specific posts in order to gain more audience. Costs are $5 to $75 to gain an extra estimated reach of 500 to 15,000. (Individual profiles pay a flat $7) Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  92. 92. Facebook Ads/Sponsored Stories Target marketing • Can select age, gender, broad category interests and even refine down to zip code • Set budget for amount spent per day or lifetime budget Can optimize for impressions or clicks Impressions are charged in cost per thousand (approximately $0.14) Pay per click can range from $2-$10 Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  93. 93. Our Practice Experience Ran Facebook ads from Oct 8 – Nov 8, 2012. – Total budget spent: $58.70 – Impressions: 647,335 over 30 days (average 21,000/day) ($0.09 cpm) 645,940 from ad, 1395 from Sponsored Story – 46 people clicked on the ad ($1.28 per click) – 2 new page likes – No business generated that we have seen yet. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  94. 94. Facebook Insights Visible only to page administrators, this analytic tool can help you fine tune your efforts on Facebook Insights allow you to monitor total number of likes, friends of fans, how many people are talking about your page and your weekly reach. Access Insights from Admin panel on page Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  97. 97. Connect with Twitter Recommend connecting your Twitter account with your Facebook Page • www.facebook.com/twitter • Allows your posts to be simultaneously “tweeted” • Keeps a presence on Twitter without extra effort Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  98. 98. • • • • • Began in 2011 Around 400 million registered users • >100 million visit every month Individual profiles and business pages allowed “Makes connecting on the web more like connecting in the real world” Easy method of sharing different things with different people. • Circles, Hangouts Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  106. 106.        Began in 2005 Second largest search engine 60 hours of video are uploaded every minute 500 Years of video are watched everyday on Facebook 4 billion videos viewed daily 4 billion hours of video viewed monthly SEARCH?? Your chances of being “Google One” are 53 Times Greater with Video! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  107. 107. If you already have a Google account (gmail, blogger, adwords, ad sense) for your practice, you can easily start your YouTube channel. – Are you using it? Videos are great for mobile users – Mobile viewers watch videos about 3x longer than those on a desktop PC Videos can help you build rapport with clients and prospective clients. But not easy for average practice. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  109. 109.         Began in 2003 More than 200 Million Users + 1 million new per week (~100 M in US) Professional / Executive Huge Data Base and Search Great Research Tool Connecting gives you 3 levels of connections Connect with highly connected people Answers section very helpful Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  113. 113. Linked In - Recommendations Endorsements written by connections that highlight your skills and strengths Useful as people search to learn about you (for business, hiring, etc) Recommendations can be requested or generated • The visibility of recommendations can also be managed on your profile Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  114. 114. Linked In - Endorsements An easy way to let people know that you recognize someone for their skills • Without the need for a well-crafted recommendation Only available to first degree connections Some endorsements can be hidden Since Sept, 2012, >200 million endorsements have been issused (~10 million per day) Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  116. 116. LinkedIn Groups More secure than Facebook Pages and Groups May provide “safe” place to share profession specific opinions and thoughts Away from public eye Dozens of veterinary specific groups already in place Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  118. 118. Began as invitation only site in 2010 Immediate acceptance, grew into one of the top ten largest social network sites by end of 2011 Touted for driving lots of traffic to retailers 83% of users are women Users “pin” photos, recipes, etc and share among each other Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  121. 121. Experts recommend • • • • Post lots of content Use TALL images Add images to all posts Ask clients using Pinterest to pin pictures of themselves and tag you • LIMITATION: Can only add photos from web, not from your computer like FB. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  122. 122. Twitter Learning to Listen Many people don’t “get” Twitter or even find it annoying. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  123. 123. It is “short bursts of inconsequential information” A micro-blogging site, originally designed for people to answer the question: What are you doing? In 140 characters or less! Now, functions more as a real time search for trending topics and news as well as a connection platform for sharing informative links. Because of brevity, no depth, younger generation and mobile use higher. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  124. 124. Traditional media and journalists are quickly discovering the value of Twitter Short tweets “teasing” a breaking story or upcoming news item can lead to increased web traffic/viewers Twitter users: Come to find information (research), read tweets and consume content. NOTE: They are also coming to vent, complain and, occasionally, praise services and companies. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  125. 125. Is Twitter For Real? OR a Fad? • 80% of Twitter accounts are inactive • @ 500 million users • 340 million tweets daily • Most do not know how to use and abandon • 94% of accounts have < 100 followers • 5% of users = 75% of all activity • The Twitter “core” is very committed. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  126. 126. Twitter (and other social media sites) represent a leveling of the playing field when it comes to interactions with companies • Emails and phone calls can be ignored • Social media gives upset clients a place to vent beyond normal social interactions. • Some clients may just search for “XYZ Animal Hospital fails” and add to the conversation…others will actively make it a personal mission to embarrass you. • Mobile devices allow complaints to happen when the clients are still in your parking lot! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  127. 127. What are people doing on Twitter? • According to research done by Pear Analytics (2009), tweets can be separated into six categories •Pointless babble – 40% •Conversational – 38% •Pass-along value – 9% •Self promotion – 6% •Spam – 4% •News -4% • The NEWS category is growing! As news gathering / research in real time. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  128. 128. A VNN Member who just did not get the whole Twitter Thing….dove in and tried it. A week later he is being followed by his local NBC TV station AND he scored a weekly gig. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  129. 129. What Do I Do With A Twitter Account? • • • Even if you don’t “tweet” regularly, it can help you monitor what is being said about you or your hospital. Use it for real time intelligence/ information (listening / “search terms”) and feedback to build relationships with clients. Also Marketing: 140 character announcements, promotions, PR, specials, good cases and updates… not as big as the others. Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  130. 130. TweetDeck Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  131. 131. HootSuite Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  132. 132. On-Line Reputation Management For Veterinary Professionals Manage or Remove Negative Reviews Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  133. 133. Manage or Remove Negative Reviews Listen Respond Claim Ownership Remove Bad Reviews Keep New Content Flowing Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  134. 134. Listen! • • • • Google Alerts Google Twitter Sproutsocial ($) Review sites like: • Yelp / Yahoo • Google Places • Citysearch Keep Track of Comments: • Word or Excel • Record of actions Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  135. 135. Respond Quickly • • • • • • • • • Half of all companies do not First try old fashioned customer service Respond to recent complaints (discuss) On prominent sites Facebook? Post Policy then delete Defend honestly and professionally Try to take “off-line” Satisfied clients – ask for positive reviews Sometimes all you can do is apologize and leave the conversation Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  136. 136. Reputation Management: Step 1 • Claim Ownership • Find all complaint sites that have reviews about you and claim your business. Without this you have no voice! • Be sure good key-words in descriptions Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  141. 141. Step 2: Remove Reviews Yelp: look up your hospital red flag reviews, inappropriate or false Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  147. 147. Fight Back Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  151. 151. For Bad Reviews; Respond Compassionately Publically, Briefly • Remember the “talk radio” rule; answer for all the other listeners not necessarily the caller. • Don’t get into detail or blow-by-blow answers, or use inflammatory words etc. • Trick is to show compassion and take the conversation off-line, to a person to person if possible! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  153. 153. Google Places: flag as inappropriate Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  155. 155. City Search: flag when logged in “report abuse” Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  157. 157. Step 3: Move Them Down! • Using your web sites or blogs to move higher with key word rich content • Depends on your “key words” within hospital name • Social media helps - active Facebook and Twitter accounts help! Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  158. 158. Confirm You Are “Known” • See if you are “indexed” • Site:myvnn.com – and see results • Use Webmaster tools from Google and Bing • Google.com/webmasters • Bing.com/toolbox/webmaster Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  162. 162. Up-To-Date Content • Dynamic content (where?) • Multi-media content • Practice web site update (2X / month) • Social sites update (2-3X/ week) Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
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  164. 164. Become A Certified Veterinary Journalist! American Society of Veterinary Journalists www.ASVJ.org Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network
  165. 165. www.MyVNN.com Our Thanks Again To… Copyright 2013, Veterinary News Network

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