© 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved

NICE Initiative for Female Entrepreneurship: White ...
© 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved

Drucker argues that true, insightful, and competent...
© 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved

Everyone loves a good story. Stories are important ...
© 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved

1.

Simplicity: Find the core of your intent and tr...
© 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved

Creativity plot: Inspired people doing inspiring th...
© 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved

How does a leader maximize tribe effectiveness and ...
© 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved

Penina Rybak MA/CCC-SLP, TSHH
CEO Socially Speaking...
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NICE Initiative Whitepaper 2 -Reflections on Storytelling by Penina Rybak

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Storytelling is an age old educational and newly re-purposed digital marketing technique that’s been “rediscovered” by social media and communications management gurus and thought leaders. Everyone loves a good story. Stories are important because they provide patterns
of a life lived and patterns to embrace or reject, depending on the outcome. Stories give us concrete examples of a sequence of events, a way of problem solving, and a blueprint of a script for you to follow or deviate from when embarking on your own script. Whether on a quest for truth, justice, or The American Dream, chances are there’s a story for that embedded in a book, movie, TV show, or video game app.Harnessing the power of storytelling, of identifying archetypes, and implementing that knowledge, together with your resiliency, will help you transition from me to we, especially when it comes to entrepreneurship and marketing yourself in terms of your service or product. It enables you to learn from others, empathize with them, and become more flexible and adaptive when your own story changes and/or intersects with another’s.

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NICE Initiative Whitepaper 2 -Reflections on Storytelling by Penina Rybak

  1. 1. © 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved NICE Initiative for Female Entrepreneurship: White Paper 2 By Penina Rybak MA/CCC-SLP, TSHH Founder/CEO Socially Speaking LLC Director: The NICE Initiative The Road to Successful Entrepreneurship Starts with Understanding the Power of Your Story: Reflections on The Use of Storytelling in Marketing Your Service/Product “Success is like reaching an important birthday and finding you’re exactly the same.” — Audrey Hepburn “There are no secrets to success. It is the result of hard work, preparation, and learning from failure.” — Colin Powell Partial Excerpt from Chapter 4 of My Book: The NICE Reboot: How to Become a Better Entrepreneur-How to Balance Your Humanity & Technology in Today’s Startup Culture (Maven House Press, January 2014): The road to successful entrepreneurship starts with becoming educated, an observer of human nature, which results in the enrichment of your actions—the ones executed in hidden increments, and the ones executed publicly on a grand scale. These components form your Story, which gets internalized and implemented through the execution of specific entrepreneurial skills. Skills which are needed to then implement four strategies for becoming a successful entrepreneur. These strategies were first proposed by Peter Drucker, dubbed the Father of Modern Management, who saw entrepreneurship as a behavior instead of a personality trait. A process that produces a Story, a pattern that others can emulate. In Innovation and Entrepreneurship, he lists the four entrepreneurial strategies that are needed for successful entrepreneurship and for that matter, good storytelling: 1. Being “fustest with the mostest” 2. “Hitting them where they ain’t” 3. Finding and occupying a specialized ecological niche 4. Changing the economic characteristics of a product, market, or industry
  2. 2. © 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved Drucker argues that true, insightful, and competent entrepreneurs position themselves physically, philosophically, or both, to cause change and talk about it with others. To do so by being the key suppliers of specific services or products in niche markets that, over time, essentially cause changes in the way people live and work and cause reform in public service industries. This change is what Clayton Christenson later referred to as disruptive innovation in The Innovator’s Dilemma. These changes get transmitted by word of mouth and now viral social media digital marketing campaigns as well. Honing your social media technology savvy and public speaking skills is crucial to being a successful entrepreneur. So is protecting your digital reputation—content, media, testimonials, and timeline. How do you do it? By being direct, passionate, and compassionate about your mission, your cause, and your raison d’être for providing your service or product. By carefully crafting and sharing your Story. Storytelling is an age old educational and newly re-purposed digital marketing technique that’s been “rediscovered” by social media and communications management gurus and thought leaders. It’s been written about extensively lately, and was one of the running themes at the Hubspot Inbound 2013 marketing convention in Boston in August. I had the pleasure of attending for the first time and heard inspiring talks on this subject from the likes of Seth Godin, Pamela Slim (whose take on it will be published in her upcoming book, Body of Work), and Dan Lyons (journalist, current Hubspot blogger, and previous author of the very clever satire blog series The Secret Diary of Steve Jobs). I paid particular attention to Dan Lyon’s talk about the importance of storytelling in marketing as a means of providing media representations and lessons (mentorship) about humanity and archetypes. He discussed archetypal storytelling and marketing, using Steve Jobs as an example. I filled in the blanks for entrepreneurs: Q: What was so great about the way Steve Jobs told a story? • He used emotive words to tell the tale • He gave an exaggerated and hyperbolized accounting of what’s happening • He was one of the first to practice psychological transparency (Lesson: Dare to be human. Speak to a larger truth by being yourself.) • He used all the four elemental archetypes of a story: 1. Betrayal, disillusionment, or need by a protagonist starts the personal quest 2. Identification of the underdog, so we know who to root for when the challenges start piling up 3. Revenge arc—the “hero” returns to turn the tables on the naysayers or enemies 4. Turnaround, resolution of conflict
  3. 3. © 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved Everyone loves a good story. Stories are important because they provide patterns of a life lived and patterns to embrace or reject, depending on the outcome. Stories give us concrete examples of a sequence of events, a way of problem solving, and a blueprint of a script for you to follow or deviate from when embarking on your own script. Whether on a quest for truth, justice, or The American Dream, chances are there’s a story for that embedded in a book, movie, TV show, or video game app. I confess I’m not into sports or gaming, yet I love sports movies (Remember the Titans, The Rookie) and used to love Myst and The Sims. Why? Because the elemental archetypes of any story boil down to one theme: causality. The seesaw upon which action/reaction and good/evil are balanced. A great story arc involves and depicts the hero’s struggle to orchestrate change, for himself or herself or for others, by finding new ways to work and invoke archetypes, lessons, and the causality loop that life is based on. How someone uses what life has thrown him or her to effect change makes for a hero, an archetype, and makes for riveting reading. Think of the worlds of Buffy and Angel, created by master storyteller Joss Whedon. Think of the TV show Heroes, created by master visual digitalization guru Tim Kring. The causality loop being reconfigured so that a linear trajectory is not always the outcome, let alone the desired path. Archetypal storytelling and consulting for branding and marketing purposes has since become a hot topic and legitimate avenue of entrepreneurship, as seen from Diane Bertolin’s fall 2013 blog series “Archetypal Consulting” and her subsequent e-book for Hubspot on this subject. I recommend that everyone read her books—educators, entrepreneurs, marketers, public speakers, and those trying to forge a human connection with others through dating, marriage, and all the steps in between. They are insightful analyses of the human condition, seen through the eyes of a female business woman and social media marketing expert. Harnessing the power of storytelling, of identifying archetypes, and implementing that knowledge, together with your resiliency, will help you transition from me to we, especially when it comes to entrepreneurship and marketing yourself in terms of your service or product. It enables you to learn from others, empathize with them, and become more flexible and adaptive when your own story changes and/or intersects with another’s. These traits need to be honed individually and fostered collectively—at home, in public, and at work. When planning on honing your storytelling to improve both the delivery and the content of your message, you should read Made to Stick by Chip and Dan Heath. In it they list six principals for effectively getting your message across. The Six Principals of Sticky Ideas, Proposed by the Heath Brothers and Interpreted by Penina Rybak:
  4. 4. © 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved 1. Simplicity: Find the core of your intent and translate that verbally and in writing as your mission and vision statements, and present these statements publicly, including via social media. 2. Unexpectedness: Find what would naturally block your message from getting out there and solve that problem technologically or intellectually or both. 3. Concreteness: Break down your business plan methodically and implement it over time at pre-planned, key intervals for more effective delivery of your service or product with less financial risk. 4. Credibility: Get people to agree with, believe in, and endorse your service or product publicly. Nurture your real-time relationships and protect your digital reputation while doing so. 5. Emotions: Get people to identify with and share your vision by showing that you care and that your service or product really addresses a particular problem. Emote! 6. Stories: Inspire others to act based on your examples and tales. Learn public speaking skills and brush up on your presentation delivery—content and style. When planning to incorporate stories into your message, you should take a look at the story and character development of the TV show Touch for inspiration. Tim Kring encompasses all the thematic elements found in a story that sticks. So does Joss Whedon in his televised series Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Both men are master storytellers; you can learn much from them. I certainly did. According to the Heath brothers, there are three types of universal themes in stories. Taken from Made to Stick, I’ve listed them below, along with practical examples of the three main character archetypes, using well known films to make my points: Challenge plot: Overcoming obstacles (Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen in The Hunger Games; Sarah Michelle Geller as Buffy Summers in Buffy the Vampire Slayer; Diane Lane as Frances Mayes in Under the Tuscan Sun; Will Smith as Del Spooner in I, Robot; Dennis Quaid as Jimmy Morris in The Rookie; and Tom Hanks as the title character in Forrest Gump) Connection plot: Unexpected friendships or relationships (Emma Stone as Skeeter and Viola Davis as Aibileen Clark in The Help; Sandra Bullock as Leigh Ann Tuohy in The Blind Side; Angela Bassett as Stella Payne and Taye Diggs as Winston Shakespeare in How Stella Got Her Groove Back; Sanaa Lathan as Kenya McQueen and Simon Baker as Brian Kelly in Something New; and Tom Cruise as Captain Nathan Algren and Ken Watanabe as Katsumoto in The Last Samurai)
  5. 5. © 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved Creativity plot: Inspired people doing inspiring things (Whoopi Goldberg as Celie Johnson in The Color Purple; Mulan in Disney’s Mulan; Winona Ryder as Jo March in Little Women; Jodi Foster as Dr. Ellie Arroway in Contact; Cuba Gooding Jr. as Carl Brashear in Men of Honor; and Daniel Craig as Tuvia Bielski in Defiance) Q: What is the outcome of using storytelling in your digital marketing campaign? A: The establishment of your tribe and thus, your entrepreneurial competence. The perception of entrepreneurial competence requires that the message sticks. It thus involves: ★ Effective delivery of the message sharing the mission. ★ Effective leadership in implementing the nuts and bolts of the mission and seeing the process to fruition. That means using your Story and your tribe, to help you execute your game plan. Seth Godin, prolific writer and thought leader extraordinaire defines a tribe as “any group of people, large or small, who are connected to one another, a leader, and idea. It’s [in] our nature [to join]. The Internet has eliminated the barriers of geography, cost, and time.” In his book groundbreaking book Tribes, he asks and answers this question: Q: Who is going to lead these tribes? A: You are. “Great leaders create movements by empowering the tribe to communicate. They establish the foundation for people to make connections, as opposed to commanding people to follow them.” Godin describe what leadership really means, which can be summed up by three telling quotes: 1. “Leaders figure out how to step into those vacuums and create motion. They work hard to generate movement—the sort of movement that can transform a group into a tribe.” 2. “Not only aren’t leaders most people, but the members of the most important tribes aren’t most people either.” 3. “Every leader cares for and supports a movement. What marketers and organizers and people who care are discovering is that they can ignite a micro- movement and then be propelled by the people who choose to follow it.” Godin raises many interesting questions in Tribes, including:
  6. 6. © 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved How does a leader maximize tribe effectiveness and build on the passion and belief in his or her mission? Let me paraphrase the answers. A leader uses his/her Story and storytelling skills to: Turn collective passion or outlook into a cause that matters—with joint goals to effect change Promote a communication paradigm, lingo, and forum to plan the tribe’s goals and share info Become an evangelist about the mission to expand the tribe Penina’s Pointers: Elements of Good Storytelling 1. Look-Invoke Humor & “Share a Moment”: Use funny visual imagery or a shared experience and/or gently find humor in universal themes to “break the ice” and connect you with your listener(s). Make your message more memorable. Physical and linguistic humor can alter perceptions, trigger a memory, and bond people now sharing a common goal or purpose. See the Nationwide car insurance ad with the baby; http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=ryNtVK55OUY 2. Listen-Pace Yourself: Use intro, short sequence of events, and ending, usually a Call to Action (CTA). Modulate your voice; your intonation, your speech rate, and/or the “tone” of your deck/pitch. See Apple™ Inc. and Sir Jony Ive’s message about design; http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=kfaetlLbgzM 3. Show-Be Transparent: Share your ups & downs. Admit to mistakes. Explain your takeaways. Increase your likeability and people’s ability to identify/empathize with you & your mission. Or, share universal ugly truths in an artistic, emotive way, to really pack a punch re: honesty! See the Philippines Pantene shampoo ad about women in business; http://www.youtube.com/watch? feature=player_detailpage&v=kOjNcZvwjxI 4. Tell-Swing That Pendulum: Showcase the conflict/problem and the stakes, and how you almost failed but then succeeded. Map out the obstacles and how you felt about them; the mood swings and reasoning involved when attempting to overcome them. Flesh out the “arc”. See Charity: Water’s September Campaign Ad for Orissa, India; http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=6bH7SPNdSt4 5. Surprise- Juxtapose the buildup & takeaway in an unexpected manner to provide an element of surprise (and humor) to promote curiosity and asking questions. See the Heineken ad for “His & Her Closets; http://www.youtube.com/watch? feature=player_detailpage&v=S1ZZreXEqSY * I didn’t use Bitly so that these links can be easily found and shared!
  7. 7. © 2013 Penina Pearl Rybak, Socially Speaking LLC, All Rights Reserved Penina Rybak MA/CCC-SLP, TSHH CEO Socially Speaking LLC Director: The NICE Initiative for Female Entrepreneurship LinkedIn Page: Penina Rybak  http://www.linkedin.com/pub/penina-rybak/ 37/900/191 Email: penina@niceinitiative.com Website: http://niceinitiative.com About.Me: http://about.me/NICE.Initiative/# Twitter: @PopGoesPenina Tumblr:  The NICE Initiative http://niceinitiative.tumblr.com WordPress Blog for Book: http://niceinitiativeblog.wordpress.com Pinterest: Peninaslp http://pinterest.com/peninaslp/the-nice-initiative-for-femaleentrepreneurship-tb/ Slideshare:  http://www.slideshare.net/PeninaRybakMACCCSLPT Facebook: The NICE Initiative https://www.facebook.com/ TheNiceInitiativeForFemaleEntrepreneurship Google +: The NICE Initiative http://google.com/ +TheNICEInitiativeFemaleEntrepreneurship YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/storytellergal Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/user19684006 Phone: (646) 820-5547

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