The Battle Of Maldon
The wolves of war advanced, the Viking troop,
Unmoved by water, westward over Pante,
Over the gleamin...
They let the file-hard spears fly from their fists,
Grimly-ground darts; and bows were busy too.
Shield received spear-poi...
A warlike Viking soldier then advanced,
His weapon raised, his shield up in defence,
And strode towards the earl, who in r...
Voluspá
52. Surt fares from the south | with the scourge of branches,
The sun of the battle-gods | shone from his sword;
T...
56. In anger smites | the warder of earth,--
Forth from their homes | must all men flee;-
Nine paces fares | the son of Fj...
59. Now do I see | the earth anew
Rise all green | from the waves again;
The cataracts fall, | and the eagle flies,
And fi...
i like my body when it is with your
i like my body when it is with your
body. It is so quite new a thing.
Muscles better a...
Txt Tlk
Hey bby, Ily, see u soon
Alright bby gurl, u on ur way
I'm drivin now bootyfull, b der n 2 mins, k?
M'kay, b caref...
The Lamentation of the Old Pensioner
ALTHOUGH I shelter from the rain
Under a broken tree
My chair was nearest to the fire...
Poetry anthology
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Poetry anthology

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Poetry anthology

  1. 1. The Battle Of Maldon The wolves of war advanced, the Viking troop, Unmoved by water, westward over Pante, Over the gleaming water bore their shields. The seamen brought their linden-shields to land. There Byrhtnoth and his warriors stood ready To meet their enemies. He told his troops To make a shield-wall and to hold it fast Against their foes. So battle with its glory Drew near. The time had come for fated men To perish in that place. A cry went up. The ravens wheeled above, the fateful eagle Keen for his carrion. On earth was uproar. Anonimous BACK
  2. 2. They let the file-hard spears fly from their fists, Grimly-ground darts; and bows were busy too. Shield received spear-point; savage was the onslaught. Fighters fell dead, young men on either side. Wulfmar was wounded. Byrhtnoth’s sister’s son Chose death in battle, he was utterly Cut down by swords. But there at once was vengeance Paid to the Vikings, for I heard that Edward Struck one of the, so fiercely with his sword, Restraining not the stroke, that at his feet The fated warrior fell to the earth. For this prince, as soon as he had time, Gave grateful thanks to his bold chamberlain. So the stout-hearted warriors stood firm In battle, and the young men eagerly Competed who might first with point of spear Deprive a fated soldier of his life; And all around the slaughtered fell to earth. Steadfast they stood, as Byrhtnoth stirred them on Bade every soldier concentrate on war Who wished to wine renown against the Danes. BACK
  3. 3. A warlike Viking soldier then advanced, His weapon raised, his shield up in defence, And strode towards the earl, who in return Marched resolutely forth to meet the churl. They each intended evil to the other. The seaman hurled a Frankish javelin So that the leader of the troops was wounded. He thrust out with his shield so that the shaft Was shattered and the spear sprang back again. Enraged, the hero seized his spear and stabbed The proud, rash Viking who had wounded him. No novice was the earl, he made his spear Pass through the young man’s neck, guided his hand So that he pierced the pirate fatally. This is one of my favourite poems. I find epic stories fascinating, so this is why I chose this one. I think that in this part of the poem the Vikings are depicted as the bad guys, and their strength is not shown in the same way as Byrhtnoth’s warriors. They are described in a really negative way. I don’t ‘like’ that. But if we consider that the Vikings are the invaders, they are the bad guys. BACK
  4. 4. Voluspá 52. Surt fares from the south | with the scourge of branches, The sun of the battle-gods | shone from his sword; The crags are sundered, | the giant-women sink, The dead throng Hel-way, | and heaven is cloven. 53. Now comes to Hlin | yet another hurt, When Othin fares | to fight with the wolf, And Beli's fair slayer | seeks out Surt, For there must fall | the joy of Frigg. 54. Then comes Sigfather's | mighty son, Vithar, to fight | with the foaming wolf; In the giant's son | does he thrust his sword Full to the heart: | his father is avenged. 55. Hither there comes | the son of Hlothyn, The bright snake gapes | to heaven above; . . . . . . . . . . Against the serpent | goes Othin's son. Anonimous BACK
  5. 5. 56. In anger smites | the warder of earth,-- Forth from their homes | must all men flee;- Nine paces fares | the son of Fjorgyn, And, slain by the serpent, | fearless he sinks. 57. The sun turns black, | earth sinks in the sea, The hot stars down | from heaven are whirled; Fierce grows the steam | and the life-feeding flame, Till fire leaps high | about heaven itself. 58. Now Garm howls loud | before Gnipahellir, The fetters will burst, | and the wolf run free; Much do I know, | and more can see Of the fate of the gods, | the mighty in fight. This is a part of the Voluspá, the first poem of the Poetic Edda, a collection of Scandinavian poems. These stanzas (52- 58) describe the Ragnarök. We see Odin’s and Thor’s deaths, and how their ‘nemesis’ are killed as well. I think that the Ragnarök is an irony, it is caused by the actions that try to prevent it. The gods try to avoid it and end up bothering those who will lead it. They bring the death of the world, just as common human beings nowadays, don’t they? BACK
  6. 6. 59. Now do I see | the earth anew Rise all green | from the waves again; The cataracts fall, | and the eagle flies, And fish he catches | beneath the cliffs. 60. The gods in Ithavoll | meet together, Of the terrible girdler | of earth they talk, And the mighty past | they call to mind, And the ancient runes | of the Ruler of Gods. 61. In wondrous beauty | once again Shall the golden tables | stand mid the grass, Which the gods had owned | in the days of old, . . . . . . . . . . 62. Then fields unsowed | bear ripened fruit, All ills grow better, | and Baldr comes back; Baldr and Hoth dwell | in Hropt's battle-hall, And the mighty gods: | would you know yet more? And these stanzas (59-62) show the beginning of a new world, and how Hor and Baldr would resurrect united. And this, union, is what we would need, in our world, now, so that all ills grow better. BACK
  7. 7. i like my body when it is with your i like my body when it is with your body. It is so quite new a thing. Muscles better and nerves more. i like your body. i like what it does, i like its hows. i like to feel the spine of your body and its bones, and the trembling -firm-smooth ness and which i will again and again and again kiss, i like kissing this and that of you, i like, slowly stroking the, shocking fuzz of your electric fur, and what-is-it comes over parting flesh ... And eyes big love-crumbs, and possibly i like the thrill of under me you so quite new Edward Estlin Cummings BACK I think this is an erotic poem describing a sexual encounter. I don’t like the use of the pronoun I in small letters. For me, this represents a problem of identity and Personality. Because of this, I see the author as seeing himself as an object in the relationship. I see his relationship as something he enjoys, but in a submissive way.
  8. 8. Txt Tlk Hey bby, Ily, see u soon Alright bby gurl, u on ur way I'm drivin now bootyfull, b der n 2 mins, k? M'kay, b carefull bby Okay, d car is right n front of me Okay bby, txt me back nyways? 4sure bby, but brb, rear end collision Lol, u ok? Yeah, lol, guy in front of me flew out windshield LOL! People r bad drivers. should have worn seatbelt ROFL brb again, veering off road in 2 lite post LMAO UhOh. bby gurl, ima b late, being air lifted 2 hospital Ugh! How lng? IDK! Brain surgery n junk. Hopefully not 2 lng. Tell you when done. Okay, ttyl d0c Mart3n I like the way this poem is written; it was new to me, kind of funny too. I think the poem shows how individualistic and selfish people can be, as well irresponsible. We see how indifferent to others’ accidents the two people talking are, and this is how most of our society is. Perhaps the guy who wrote it only meant to amuse, but I think this is much deeper than that. BACK
  9. 9. The Lamentation of the Old Pensioner ALTHOUGH I shelter from the rain Under a broken tree My chair was nearest to the fire In every company That talked of love or politics, Ere Time transfigured me. Though lads are making pikes again For some conspiracy, And crazy rascals rage their fill At human tyranny, My contemplations are of Time That has transfigured me. There's not a woman turns her face Upon a broken tree, And yet the beauties that I loved Are in my memory; I spit into the face of Time That has transfigured me. d0c Mart3n I imagine that the narrator of this is an old person who feels proud of the time they lived in and of the experience gained. I don’t get why this is a lamentation; I believe the poem depicts a positive scene. Besides, this is how I see age, as a succesion of Events and achievements, and of gained wisdom. BACK

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