pearcemayfield is an Accredited Training Organisation in PRINCE2®, Managing Successful Programmes, Change
Management, M_o_...
A Sense-Making Framework
The genius of P3O is that it takes previously-disparate elements of
management practice and joins...
The main areas of benefit to a senior manager can be represented by this 3-legged stool.
It is one of several ways that th...
So first, let’s first consider “Decision Support’.
P3O offers a senior manager – or a decision-maker at any level – the po...
The late Sir John Harvey-Jones was famous for his turnaround of ICI in the 1980’s.
When he took over as Executive Chairman...
For example, he insisted that each morning,
the stand-alone PC on his desk was loaded
the latest performance data on all o...
Of course, today we have EIS systems sitting on integrated LAN and WAN networks, cloud servers and so on.
In operational m...
The project manager needed help.
Here we a project, which is temporary, delivering its output to operations.
Fairly early ...
So the practice of setting up project offices sprang up, which supported the project manager but also
began to assure that...
Over the last decade or so, managers in the Change Agenda have witnessed the emergence of programs
– vehicles for deliveri...
In more recent years the portfolio level of
management has been recognised: where
senior managers make decisions on
implem...
So there emerges these three levels of support office: the Project Office, the
Programme Office and the Portfolio Office. ...
P3O is more the governance
linking the three levels of
decision support together, as
well as integrated
communications wit...
The visual metaphor used occasionally in
the P3O Guide is ‘Governance Backbone’.
This gives us a valuable insight into its...
“Design Your Ideal
Portfolio Dashboard”
Below is an expression of an ideal Portfolio Dashboard – what an executive might w...
So we’ve explored how P3O can provide a powerful backbone to enable better decisions.
Now let’s look at delivery support.
Another function of the backbone in our
bodies is that it provides a flexible
support for our frame.
Similarly, in the cha...
Finally there is the Centre of Excellence function. This helps reassure senior management that
the whole execution of the ...
Once senior management are fully aware of the size
and potential contribution their ongoing investment
in change through p...
The conventional approach is to take external measures of best practice in portfolio,
program and project management (PPPM...
Another approach is to look for
better practice within the
organisation itself - to look for what
have been called ‘positi...
So, in summary, there are three major areas of benefit from P3O:
1. the ability to make better decisions, based upon, rele...
A Sense-Making Framework
The genius of P3O is that it takes previously-disparate elements of
management practice and joins...
P3O Class of
November 2009
Bangalore
So invest in yourself and your organisation as these people did. Come on one of our
P...
Thank you
www.pearcemayfield.com
Patrick Mayfield, Executive Chairman
Twitter: @PatrickMayfield
Blog: http://pearcemayfiel...
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P3O (Portfolio, Programme and Project Offices) - The Big Picture

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A presentation by Patrick Mayfield about Portfolio, Programme, & Project Offices.

This presentation was first given at the APM Group Best Practice showcase in India (2010).

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  • Finished qt 9:45am

    Change History:
    13/5/09: v1.2:
    - Added additional bullet on ‘Course Introduction’ slide (‘Guide & Course Book’)
  • P3O (Portfolio, Programme and Project Offices) - The Big Picture

    1. 1. pearcemayfield is an Accredited Training Organisation in PRINCE2®, Managing Successful Programmes, Change Management, M_o_R® and P3O® Portfolio, Programme, & Project Offices The Big Picture • P3O® is a Registered Trade Mark of the Office of Government Commerce. The Swirl logo™ is a Trade Mark of the Office of Government Commerce., Managing Successful Programmes, is a programme management methodology, owned by the Office of Government Commerce (OGC). And MSPTM is a Trade Mark of the Office of Government Commerce. M_o_R® is a Registered Trade Mark of the Office of Government Commerce. • Sample exam papers are © The APM Group Ltd 2008. These documents remain the property of The APM Group Ltd (APMG). Copying or re-sale under any circumstances is prohibited. • Course slides, exercises, and workbooks are © Pearce Mayfield Associates distributed under license by Pearce Mayfield Associates Limited. • All other materials are © Pearce Mayfield Associates Limited 2009, Copying of this material is permitted where for use by the candidate during this course, re-sale under any circumstances is prohibited.
    2. 2. A Sense-Making Framework The genius of P3O is that it takes previously-disparate elements of management practice and joins them together into a powerful platform for senior managers.
    3. 3. The main areas of benefit to a senior manager can be represented by this 3-legged stool. It is one of several ways that the functions within P3O are grouped. This also serves well as a summary of 3 main benefits to senior managers and executives who Grapple with the ‘Change Agenda’ within their organisation – the organisation’s investment in all its projects and programmes.
    4. 4. So first, let’s first consider “Decision Support’. P3O offers a senior manager – or a decision-maker at any level – the potential to make better decisions on the basis of accurate, timely and relevant information.
    5. 5. The late Sir John Harvey-Jones was famous for his turnaround of ICI in the 1980’s. When he took over as Executive Chairman of the chemical conglomerate it was loss-making. In his first 30 months he turned around to the position of reporting a £10billion annual profit. He style was fast tempo, driving out waste wherever he found it.
    6. 6. For example, he insisted that each morning, the stand-alone PC on his desk was loaded the latest performance data on all operating units within the business. He wouldn’t accept that this couldn’t be done. Among other things, it required two systems analysts working through the night each night, extracting the data from the mainframes, cleaning the data and representing it as a performance dashboard on Harvey-Jones’ PC. This enabled him to drill down to poor performing units and make fast decisions with some confidence. In some respects he was ahead of his time. Certainly in one respect he was ahead of his technology.
    7. 7. Of course, today we have EIS systems sitting on integrated LAN and WAN networks, cloud servers and so on. In operational management there is now an expectation from senior managers that they can and should have good dashboard information from which they can drill down to specific operating units. This is fine for operational management. But what about the Change Agenda – all the programmes and projects other than ‘business as usual’? There are now equivalent EIS tools with dashboard facilities, but the problem is that these functions are often neutralised by an immature or inadequate organisation behind them. Where is the equivalent to Harvey-Jones’ systems analysts?
    8. 8. The project manager needed help. Here we a project, which is temporary, delivering its output to operations. Fairly early on in the history of ICT project management it was realised that unless the single project manager had support, their competence would be neutralised by the sheer logistical demands of administration, plan maintenance and reporting.
    9. 9. So the practice of setting up project offices sprang up, which supported the project manager but also began to assure that all was well on the project – providing an independent and extra pair of eyes for the project’s owner.
    10. 10. Over the last decade or so, managers in the Change Agenda have witnessed the emergence of programs – vehicles for delivering transformational change. Here a program delivers not merely a single project deliverable, but a coherent capability, enabling a set-change in business performance. As with projects, the case for the equivalent of a project office – a programme office – was compelling.
    11. 11. In more recent years the portfolio level of management has been recognised: where senior managers make decisions on implementing strategy through all the projects and programs within that organisation. It involves prioritising some work before others because resources are scarce. It involves optimising the use of resources and minimising disruption to operations. This is not new. Good senior managers have always attended to this. Now they are offered support in their portfolio decision-making by portfolio analysts and perhaps a portfolio manager, all of whom sit in a Portfolio Office.
    12. 12. So there emerges these three levels of support office: the Project Office, the Programme Office and the Portfolio Office. Is that, then, P3O? Hardly. All that gives us is bureaucracy, mostly cost on the business case with marginal benefit. No, the concept of P3O is bigger than that. More integrative than that.
    13. 13. P3O is more the governance linking the three levels of decision support together, as well as integrated communications with the operational level of business.
    14. 14. The visual metaphor used occasionally in the P3O Guide is ‘Governance Backbone’. This gives us a valuable insight into its true nature. Our backbones provide a protection for the data bus between our brain and the rest of our body called the Central Nervous System. The Central Nervous System does not make the decision – the brain does – but it is essential for the brain’s executive control of each part of the body. Likewise the P3O does not make the decisions, but serves decision-makers at all levels in the organisation with relevant, timely, accurate and consistent information – upon which better decisions can be made.
    15. 15. “Design Your Ideal Portfolio Dashboard” Below is an expression of an ideal Portfolio Dashboard – what an executive might want to see on their screen – design a delegate on a flip chart on one of our P3O Practitioner courses. After this exercise we discuss aspects of what they have designed. Often a delegate will ask, “Can we really have this kind of information?” This is a healthier process to begin with than simply to accept the default reports provided by an EPM system such as Project Server.
    16. 16. So we’ve explored how P3O can provide a powerful backbone to enable better decisions. Now let’s look at delivery support.
    17. 17. Another function of the backbone in our bodies is that it provides a flexible support for our frame. Similarly, in the chaos of the Change Agenda, there are several areas where the programs and projects require support, otherwise they would just collapse. These areas of support can range from providing specialist expertise when and where it is needed, to providing assurance that all is well. P3O’s delivery support helps the senior manager sleep easy at night knowing that all is well, that anything they should be alerted to they will be alerted to.
    18. 18. Finally there is the Centre of Excellence function. This helps reassure senior management that the whole execution of the Portfolio at all levels is improving, that better practice is being adopted.
    19. 19. Once senior management are fully aware of the size and potential contribution their ongoing investment in change through programs and projects, they want best value from this through improved performance. They want program management and project management to improve. The P3O is ideally positioned to drive this.
    20. 20. The conventional approach is to take external measures of best practice in portfolio, program and project management (PPPM) and apply these. The P3M3 is a Maturity Model covering all three levels and maps an organisation’s maturity in these areas against internationally-recognised levels.
    21. 21. Another approach is to look for better practice within the organisation itself - to look for what have been called ‘positive deviance’ or the ‘bright spots’ – and then work to replicate that practice across all programs and projects.
    22. 22. So, in summary, there are three major areas of benefit from P3O: 1. the ability to make better decisions, based upon, relevant, timely, accurate and consistent information; 2. Having an internal but independent function that supports delivery and assures the senior manager that all is well; and 3. The assurance that the execution of the portfolio is improving – at all levels. Overall, this provides the senior manage with much-needed …. CONFIDENCE
    23. 23. A Sense-Making Framework The genius of P3O is that it takes previously-disparate elements of management practice and joins them together into a powerful platform for senior managers.
    24. 24. P3O Class of November 2009 Bangalore So invest in yourself and your organisation as these people did. Come on one of our P3O training courses and then begin to experience the benefits for yourself.
    25. 25. Thank you www.pearcemayfield.com Patrick Mayfield, Executive Chairman Twitter: @PatrickMayfield Blog: http://pearcemayfield.typepad.com/patrick_mayfield/

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