Developing and nurturing knowledge flows: a Peer-to-Patent Australia case study Presentation to Knowledge Transfer and Ret...
My presentation <ul><li>The IP system and knowledge flows </li></ul><ul><li>The Gov 2.0 agenda and IP </li></ul><ul><li>Ci...
IP system in Australia
<ul><li>Responsible for administering Australia’s intellectual property (IP) rights system, specifically trade marks, inve...
What is a patent? <ul><li>A patent is a right granted for any device, substance, method or process which is new, inventive...
Some Australian inventions <ul><li>first full-length feature film (1906) </li></ul><ul><li>surf lifesaving reels (1906) </...
A prolific inventor <ul><li>With  1,093 patents  to his name, Thomas Edison (1847-1931) remains the most prolific inventor...
Opening up knowledge flows to drive innovation People need to share what they already know, in order to achieve more and t...
Making connections <ul><li>Web 2.0 is helping to make those connections </li></ul>
Crowdsourcing – calling in the cavalry Ordinary people possess extraordinary knowledge they are willing to share when it i...
And they will contribute if asked  Citizen participation in government
Gov 2.0 <ul><li>The first step towards a government that can cope with the complexities of the modern world might well be ...
Citizen expertise and democracy The information deficit as a democratic deficit Citizen participation and trust From CIPAS...
Gov 2.0 <ul><li>More than half of all Australians now interact with government using web 2.0 technologies </li></ul><ul><l...
From  Wikinomics  to  Wikigovernment
’ Together we can accomplish what cannot be done alone’ ~ Beth Noveck, US Deputy Chief Technology Officer for Open and Tra...
Gov 2.0 and IP <ul><li>Collaborative Governance - Bringing Information to Innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Law | Policy | Tech...
Began  November 2009 In association with QUT   Pilot program to test the effectiveness of open, public participation in th...
What is Peer to Patent (P2P)? <ul><li>connecting the scientific community to the patent examination process </li></ul><ul>...
<ul><li>access to better information by means of an open network for community participation </li></ul><ul><li>social soft...
How does it work?
What are the benefits? <ul><li>Applicants . Applicants receive timely feedback from knowledgeable peers on prior art perti...
What are the benefits? <ul><li>The IP agency.   The Public – Peer review gives more confidence that all prior art relevant...
What’s next? <ul><li>Post-Issue Peer-to-Patent   (US) </li></ul><ul><li>Open Patent   (US) </li></ul><ul><li>Open governme...
<ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>
For more information visit   http://www.peertopatent.com.au/ Or contact: Paulette Paterson  Manager, Strategic Planning an...
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Peer To Patent Presentation To Ark Conference 24 May 2010v2ppt#1

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Peer To Patent Presentation To Ark Conference 24 May 2010v2ppt#1

  1. 1. Developing and nurturing knowledge flows: a Peer-to-Patent Australia case study Presentation to Knowledge Transfer and Retention Forum 24 May 2010 Paulette Paterson
  2. 2. My presentation <ul><li>The IP system and knowledge flows </li></ul><ul><li>The Gov 2.0 agenda and IP </li></ul><ul><li>Citizen participation in government </li></ul><ul><li>Peer to Patent – “a modest proposal” </li></ul>
  3. 3. IP system in Australia
  4. 4. <ul><li>Responsible for administering Australia’s intellectual property (IP) rights system, specifically trade marks, inventions (patents), designs and plant breeder’s rights. </li></ul><ul><li>Role : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>creating a safe and secure environment in which to make the intellectual investment necessary to innovate and thereby encourages research and development; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>promoting the disclosure of discoveries and follow-on generation of ideas; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>enabling firms to build brand value and business reputation which in turn contributes to improved consumer confidence; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>providing a legal framework in which to trade ideas. </li></ul></ul>IP Australia
  5. 5. What is a patent? <ul><li>A patent is a right granted for any device, substance, method or process which is new, inventive and useful </li></ul><ul><li>A standard patent gives long-term protection and control over an invention for up to 20 years. </li></ul>In return, patent applicants must share their know-how by providing a full description of how their invention works. This information becomes public and can provide the basis for further research by others. The Hills Rotary Hoist, launched in 1946. Image courtesy of the Sydney Morning Herald.
  6. 6. Some Australian inventions <ul><li>first full-length feature film (1906) </li></ul><ul><li>surf lifesaving reels (1906) </li></ul><ul><li>sunshine header harvester (1914) </li></ul><ul><li>speedo swimwear (1929) </li></ul><ul><li>rotary clothes line (1946) </li></ul><ul><li>wine casks (1965) </li></ul><ul><li>staysharp knives (1970) </li></ul><ul><li>racecam live television broadcast (1979) </li></ul><ul><li>wall-mounted Miniboil machines (1981) </li></ul><ul><li>dual-flush toilets (1982) </li></ul><ul><li>baby safety capsules (1984) </li></ul><ul><li>smartmodem (1992) </li></ul>
  7. 7. A prolific inventor <ul><li>With 1,093 patents to his name, Thomas Edison (1847-1931) remains the most prolific inventor in U.S. history. Among many other inventions, Edison is the father of the light bulb, the phonograph and motion pictures with sound. </li></ul>Edison's laboratory for experimenting with sound recordings.
  8. 8. Opening up knowledge flows to drive innovation People need to share what they already know, in order to achieve more and to innovate.
  9. 9. Making connections <ul><li>Web 2.0 is helping to make those connections </li></ul>
  10. 10. Crowdsourcing – calling in the cavalry Ordinary people possess extraordinary knowledge they are willing to share when it is easy to do so
  11. 11. And they will contribute if asked Citizen participation in government
  12. 12. Gov 2.0 <ul><li>The first step towards a government that can cope with the complexities of the modern world might well be acceptance of the fact that it can’t do it alone. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Citizen expertise and democracy The information deficit as a democratic deficit Citizen participation and trust From CIPAST citizen participation in science and technology http://www.cipast.org/cipast.php?section=212&PHPSESSID=8c15a797855d474b973c9a0f6a19387f
  14. 14. Gov 2.0 <ul><li>More than half of all Australians now interact with government using web 2.0 technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Increasingly governments broadcast a problem, issue or task on an interactive website that enables the community to collaborate on coming up with the best solution. </li></ul>
  15. 15. From Wikinomics to Wikigovernment
  16. 16. ’ Together we can accomplish what cannot be done alone’ ~ Beth Noveck, US Deputy Chief Technology Officer for Open and Transparent Government
  17. 17. Gov 2.0 and IP <ul><li>Collaborative Governance - Bringing Information to Innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Law | Policy | Technology </li></ul>
  18. 18. Began November 2009 In association with QUT Pilot program to test the effectiveness of open, public participation in the patent examination process Business method/computer software focus <ul><li>Based on the work of the New York Law School between 2007 and 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.peertopatent.org.au </li></ul>Peer to Patent Australia ( P2P )
  19. 19. What is Peer to Patent (P2P)? <ul><li>connecting the scientific community to the patent examination process </li></ul><ul><li>an experiment in using the tools of the social web to create models for participatory government. </li></ul><ul><li>the community is invited to augment the work of the official patent examiner by assisting with identifying “prior art” </li></ul><ul><li>Goal : improve the quality of issued patents by giving the patent examiner </li></ul>
  20. 20. <ul><li>access to better information by means of an open network for community participation </li></ul><ul><li>social software tied directly to the legal and political process </li></ul><ul><li>designed to channel the right information </li></ul><ul><li>opportunity to engage directly with the patent office and be heard </li></ul><ul><li>final decision made by IP agency </li></ul>Rationale
  21. 21. How does it work?
  22. 22. What are the benefits? <ul><li>Applicants . Applicants receive timely feedback from knowledgeable peers on prior art pertinent to their published application for a patent. </li></ul><ul><li>The burden of proof of inventive step. By utilising community expertise, the burden is no longer on the patent examiner or the inventor alone to identify whether or not a patent application is, in fact, novel and non-obvious. </li></ul><ul><li>Competitors . Industry peers to see boundaries set by previously published inventions early in the process and potentially avoid conflicts. </li></ul>
  23. 23. What are the benefits? <ul><li>The IP agency. The Public – Peer review gives more confidence that all prior art relevant to the examination process was considered in the granting of a patent. </li></ul><ul><li>The Patent System. Litigation and costs associated with uncertainty over the scope of patent rights may be reduced as interested parties have an opportunity to weigh in at the beginning of the patent review process and weed out prospectively poor quality patents. </li></ul><ul><li>P2P should contribute to the harmonisation of the global system by accelerating a more collaborative examination community and improvements in the global search environment. </li></ul>
  24. 24. What’s next? <ul><li>Post-Issue Peer-to-Patent (US) </li></ul><ul><li>Open Patent (US) </li></ul><ul><li>Open government initiatives (US) </li></ul><ul><li>Initiative for open government (Australia) </li></ul>
  25. 25. <ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>
  26. 26. For more information visit http://www.peertopatent.com.au/ Or contact: Paulette Paterson Manager, Strategic Planning and Corporate Reporting IP Australia 47 Bowes St Woden ACT 2606 postal address PO Box 200 Woden ACT 2606 phone  +61 2 62832749   0423847089 (mobile) fax +61 2 6283 7999 email [email_address]

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