Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

What is health?

1,136 views

Published on

Dr. Richard Chmielewski, DO, FACEP, NMM/OMM, of the Falcon Clinic in Utica, gave a presentation April 10th, 2017 on the question, "What is Health?"

More information can be found on http://falconclinic.com or by contacting Dr.Chmielewski at doctorchm@gmail.com

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Don't even THINK about buying any uterine fibroids product, drugs or going on a gimmick fibroids program until you read my revealing, no-holds barred holistic uterine fibroids cure book. ♣♣♣ http://t.cn/Aig7V1M7
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • I recovered from bulimia. You can too! learn more... ♣♣♣ http://scamcb.com/bulimiarec/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

What is health?

  1. 1. What is Health?What is Health? RICHARD CHMIELEWSKI, DO,RICHARD CHMIELEWSKI, DO, FACEP, NMM/OMMFACEP, NMM/OMM THE FALCON CLINIC FOR HEALTH, WELLNESS AND RECOVERYTHE FALCON CLINIC FOR HEALTH, WELLNESS AND RECOVERY 1 OXFORD CROSSING, SUITE #11 OXFORD CROSSING, SUITE #1 NEW HARTFORD, NEW YORK 13413NEW HARTFORD, NEW YORK 13413
  2. 2. Randomly asking people -Randomly asking people - “What is Health”?“What is Health”? • It’s the absence of diseaseIt’s the absence of disease • It’s a spiritual thingIt’s a spiritual thing • It’s something above your brainstemIt’s something above your brainstem • It’s how you feel at the timeIt’s how you feel at the time • It’s all based on your geneticsIt’s all based on your genetics • ““Health is Osteopathy – theHealth is Osteopathy – the normalization of the structure of thenormalization of the structure of the body, to allow it to heal”body, to allow it to heal”
  3. 3. One answer I liked:One answer I liked: • My daughter, a mother with a 2My daughter, a mother with a 2 yr old and a 3 month oldyr old and a 3 month old replied:replied: • Health is when you can get aHealth is when you can get a full 8 hours of sleep withoutfull 8 hours of sleep without interruption”interruption”
  4. 4. What is the “standard” set ofWhat is the “standard” set of parameters that determine that youparameters that determine that you are healthy?are healthy? • Physical ExamPhysical Exam • Blood TestingBlood Testing • UrinalysisUrinalysis • Chest XrayChest Xray • ECG and cardiac stress testingECG and cardiac stress testing
  5. 5. Ancillary Testing that your doctorAncillary Testing that your doctor might also use:might also use: • Hormone LevelsHormone Levels • Testing for Heavy Metals ( lead,Testing for Heavy Metals ( lead, mercury, arsenic, cadmium)mercury, arsenic, cadmium) • Thyroid panelThyroid panel • Arthritis PanelArthritis Panel • Gene testing ( BRCA1 and BRCA2,Gene testing ( BRCA1 and BRCA2, 23andME)23andME) • EtceteraEtcetera
  6. 6. The Framingham Heart StudyThe Framingham Heart Study • Is a project of the National Heart, Lung,Is a project of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, in collaboration withand Blood Institute, in collaboration with (since 1971) Boston University(since 1971) Boston University • The study began in 1948 with 5,209The study began in 1948 with 5,209 adult subjects from Framingham, and isadult subjects from Framingham, and is now on its third generation ofnow on its third generation of participantsparticipants https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Framingham_Heart_Stud y
  7. 7. Things we’ve learned from it:Things we’ve learned from it: • 1960’s1960’s • Cigarette smoking increases risk ofCigarette smoking increases risk of heart disease. Increased cholesterolheart disease. Increased cholesterol and elevated blood pressure increaseand elevated blood pressure increase risk of heart disease. Exerciserisk of heart disease. Exercise decreases risk of heart disease, anddecreases risk of heart disease, and obesity increases it.obesity increases it.
  8. 8. Things we’ve learned from it:Things we’ve learned from it: • 1970’s1970’s • Elevated blood pressure increases risk ofElevated blood pressure increases risk of stroke.stroke. • In women who are postmenopausal, risk ofIn women who are postmenopausal, risk of heart disease is increased, compared withheart disease is increased, compared with women who are premenopausal.women who are premenopausal. • Psychosocial factors affect risk of heartPsychosocial factors affect risk of heart disease.disease.
  9. 9. Things we’ve learned from it:Things we’ve learned from it: • 1980’s1980’s • High levels of HDL cholesterol reduceHigh levels of HDL cholesterol reduce risk of heart disease.risk of heart disease.
  10. 10. What we’ve learned from it:What we’ve learned from it: • 1990’s1990’s • Having an enlarged left ventricle of the heart (leftHaving an enlarged left ventricle of the heart (left ventricular hypertrophy) increases risk of stroke.ventricular hypertrophy) increases risk of stroke. • Elevated blood pressure can progress to heartElevated blood pressure can progress to heart failure.failure. • Framingham Risk Score is published, and correctlyFramingham Risk Score is published, and correctly predicts 10-year risk of future coronary heart diseasepredicts 10-year risk of future coronary heart disease (CHD) events.(CHD) events. • At 40 years of age, the lifetime risk for CHD is 50%At 40 years of age, the lifetime risk for CHD is 50% for men and 33% for women.for men and 33% for women.
  11. 11. Framingham Risk ScoreFramingham Risk Score • Gender-specific algorithm used toGender-specific algorithm used to estimate the 10-year cardiovascularestimate the 10-year cardiovascular risk of an individual.risk of an individual. • The Framingham Risk Score was firstThe Framingham Risk Score was first developed based on data obtained fromdeveloped based on data obtained from the Framingham Heart Study, tothe Framingham Heart Study, to estimate the 10-year risk of developingestimate the 10-year risk of developing coronary heart disease.coronary heart disease.
  12. 12. What will it take to have you liveWhat will it take to have you live longer? Is that what health is?longer? Is that what health is? – Weight – fat to lean ratioWeight – fat to lean ratio – Wearing a helmet and using seat beltsWearing a helmet and using seat belts – Getting vaccinatedGetting vaccinated – Public hygiene - should we live in aPublic hygiene - should we live in a sterile environment?sterile environment? – Does gut health equal general health, aDoes gut health equal general health, a healthy immune system?healthy immune system?
  13. 13. What is a Healthy Weight?What is a Healthy Weight? • Normal weight - The ideal human bodyNormal weight - The ideal human body weight has been a topic of debate for a veryweight has been a topic of debate for a very long time. Hundreds of formulas and theorieslong time. Hundreds of formulas and theories have been invented and put to the test, buthave been invented and put to the test, but the answer is still debatable.the answer is still debatable. • The ideal weight should be unique forThe ideal weight should be unique for everyone.everyone. • The major factors that contribute to aThe major factors that contribute to a person's ideal weight are height, gender, age,person's ideal weight are height, gender, age, body frame, body type, and so on.body frame, body type, and so on. http://www.calculator.net/ideal-weight-calculator.html? ctype=standard&cage=67&csex=m&cheightfeet=5&cheightinch=10&cheightmeter=180&printit=0&x=73&y=9
  14. 14. Formulas to calculate the “idealFormulas to calculate the “ideal weight”:weight”: • J. D. Robinson Formula (1983)J. D. Robinson Formula (1983) • 52 kg + 1.9 kg per inch over 5 feet (man)52 kg + 1.9 kg per inch over 5 feet (man) 49 kg + 1.7 kg per inch over 5 feet (woman)49 kg + 1.7 kg per inch over 5 feet (woman) • D. R. Miller Formula (1983)D. R. Miller Formula (1983) • 56.2 kg + 1.41 kg per inch over 5 feet (man)56.2 kg + 1.41 kg per inch over 5 feet (man) 53.1 kg + 1.36 kg per inch over 5 feet (woman)53.1 kg + 1.36 kg per inch over 5 feet (woman) • G. J. Hamwi Formula (1964)G. J. Hamwi Formula (1964) • 48.0 kg + 2.7 kg per inch over 5 feet (man)48.0 kg + 2.7 kg per inch over 5 feet (man) 45.5 kg + 2.2 kg per inch over 5 feet (woman)45.5 kg + 2.2 kg per inch over 5 feet (woman) • B. J. Devine Formula (1974)B. J. Devine Formula (1974) • 50.0 + 2.3 kg per inch over 5 feet (man)50.0 + 2.3 kg per inch over 5 feet (man) 45.5 + 2.3 kg per inch over 5 feet (woman)45.5 + 2.3 kg per inch over 5 feet (woman)
  15. 15. Body Mass Index - BMIBody Mass Index - BMI • a number based on your weight anda number based on your weight and height. In general, the higher theheight. In general, the higher the number, the more body fat a personnumber, the more body fat a person has.has.
  16. 16. BMI is based on height and weightBMI is based on height and weight • Underweight: YourUnderweight: Your BMIBMI is less thanis less than 18.5.18.5. • HealthyHealthy weight: Yourweight: Your BMIBMI is 18.5 tois 18.5 to 24.9.24.9. • Overweight: YourOverweight: Your BMIBMI is 25 to 29.9.is 25 to 29.9. • Obese: YourObese: Your BMIBMI is 30 or higher.is 30 or higher.
  17. 17. Controversy over BMIControversy over BMI • more researchers argue that it’s not the mostmore researchers argue that it’s not the most accurate way to measure body weight.accurate way to measure body weight. • BMI can’t distinguish between fat andBMI can’t distinguish between fat and muscle, which tends to be heaviermuscle, which tends to be heavier • BMI also doesn’t tease apart different typesBMI also doesn’t tease apart different types of fat, each of which can have differentof fat, each of which can have different metabolic effects on health.metabolic effects on health. • Belly fat is more harmful than fat that simplyBelly fat is more harmful than fat that simply sitting under the skin.sitting under the skin.
  18. 18. 10 tips to help maximize your10 tips to help maximize your longevity and quality of life:longevity and quality of life: • Control StressControl Stress • Manage your Blood PressureManage your Blood Pressure • Don’t SmokeDon’t Smoke • Get your SleepGet your Sleep • Maintain Good NutritionMaintain Good Nutrition • Exercise your BodyExercise your Body • Exercise your BrainExercise your Brain • Stay PositiveStay Positive • Maintain Close RelationshipsMaintain Close Relationships • Be SpiritualBe Spiritual http://www.nextavenue.org/10-ways-live-longer-and-better/
  19. 19. Control StressControl Stress • Set aside leisure time. ...Set aside leisure time. ... • Do something you enjoy every day. ...Do something you enjoy every day. ... • Keep your sense of humor. ...Keep your sense of humor. ... • Don't over-commit yourself. ...Don't over-commit yourself. ... • Prioritize tasks. ...Prioritize tasks. ... • Break projects into small steps. ...Break projects into small steps. ... • Delegate responsibility. ...Delegate responsibility. ... • Eat a healthy diet.Eat a healthy diet. https://www.helpguide.org/articles/stress/stress-management.htm
  20. 20. Manage Your Blood PressureManage Your Blood Pressure • Have your blood pressure checked periodicallyHave your blood pressure checked periodically • Lose extra pounds and watch your waistline. BloodLose extra pounds and watch your waistline. Blood pressure often increases as weight increases. ...pressure often increases as weight increases. ... • Exercise regularly. ...Exercise regularly. ... • Eat a healthy diet. ...Eat a healthy diet. ... • Reduce sodium in your diet. ...Reduce sodium in your diet. ... • Limit the amount of alcohol you drink.Limit the amount of alcohol you drink. www.mayoclinic.org/diseases.../high-blood-pressure/in...blood-pressure/art-20046974
  21. 21. Don’t SmokeDon’t Smoke • ““Quitting smoking is one of the easiest things toQuitting smoking is one of the easiest things to do….and I should know, I’ve done it a thousanddo….and I should know, I’ve done it a thousand times.” – Mark Twaintimes.” – Mark Twain • Best advice is to never have started smoking in theBest advice is to never have started smoking in the first placefirst place • The 1964 landmarkThe 1964 landmark reportreport, released by, released by SurgeonSurgeon GeneralGeneral Dr. Luther Terry, was the first federalDr. Luther Terry, was the first federal governmentgovernment reportreport linkinglinking smokingsmoking and ill health,and ill health, including lung cancer and heart disease.including lung cancer and heart disease. https://www.surgeongeneral.gov/priorities/tobacco/
  22. 22. Get Your SleepGet Your Sleep • People seem to wear their lack of sleep like aPeople seem to wear their lack of sleep like a badge of honor.badge of honor. • Most people need 7 to 8 hours of good quality,Most people need 7 to 8 hours of good quality, uninterrupted sleepuninterrupted sleep • Sleep is important for memory.Sleep is important for memory. • Having a lifestyle that lacks adequate sleep canHaving a lifestyle that lacks adequate sleep can increase blood pressure, cause depression andincrease blood pressure, cause depression and ultimately shorten life.ultimately shorten life. • It’s making us sick. It’s making us depressed. It’sIt’s making us sick. It’s making us depressed. It’s making us fat and aging us at an accelerated rate.making us fat and aging us at an accelerated rate.
  23. 23. Maintain Good NutritionMaintain Good Nutrition • Eat the foods you love but be smartEat the foods you love but be smart about portions.about portions. • Most importantly, eat a varied diet thatMost importantly, eat a varied diet that includes lots of vegetables and fruits.includes lots of vegetables and fruits.
  24. 24. Food: Healthy vs Not So HealthyFood: Healthy vs Not So Healthy • HEALTHYHEALTHY • Fresh fruits and vegetablesFresh fruits and vegetables • Fresh leafy greensFresh leafy greens • Cold pressed extra virgin oilsCold pressed extra virgin oils • Raw nuts and seedsRaw nuts and seeds • SproutsSprouts • Seaweeds and sea vegetablesSeaweeds and sea vegetables
  25. 25. Food: Healthy vs Not So HealthyFood: Healthy vs Not So Healthy • UNHEALTHYUNHEALTHY • Processed “white” foods like white breads,Processed “white” foods like white breads, white pastas, etc.white pastas, etc. • Refined white sugar, high fructose cornRefined white sugar, high fructose corn syrup, aspartamesyrup, aspartame • Addictive substances like MSG, and otherAddictive substances like MSG, and other “taste enhancing” chemicals“taste enhancing” chemicals • Processed, denatured fats and oils that theProcessed, denatured fats and oils that the body cannot deal withbody cannot deal with
  26. 26. Food: Healthy vs Not So HealthyFood: Healthy vs Not So Healthy
  27. 27. Exercise Your BodyExercise Your Body • Move. Just move.Move. Just move. • If you want to keep your muscles and bonesIf you want to keep your muscles and bones young, it means using them.young, it means using them. • Find an activity you enjoy. If you don’t enjoyFind an activity you enjoy. If you don’t enjoy the activity, you will not stay with it.the activity, you will not stay with it. • If you hate running on a treadmill, don’t do it.If you hate running on a treadmill, don’t do it. If you love tennis, play tennis. It can even beIf you love tennis, play tennis. It can even be just walking, but commit to doing it regularly.just walking, but commit to doing it regularly. • Move.Move.
  28. 28. Exercise Your BrainExercise Your Brain • Keep your brain challenged, especiallyKeep your brain challenged, especially with new things.with new things. • Replace routine with new learning.Replace routine with new learning. • Seek out new experiences.Seek out new experiences. • Your brain thrives on challenges andYour brain thrives on challenges and learning. So be a student for life.learning. So be a student for life.
  29. 29. Stay PositiveStay Positive • There is a saying: “The me I see, is the me I’llThere is a saying: “The me I see, is the me I’ll be.”be.” • If you choose to see yourself as old andIf you choose to see yourself as old and failing, you’ll likely carry yourself that way.failing, you’ll likely carry yourself that way. • The key word is “choose.”The key word is “choose.” • You have a choice with how you seeYou have a choice with how you see everything in life, including yourself.everything in life, including yourself. • Pessimism is associated with a weakenedPessimism is associated with a weakened immune response to tumors and infection.immune response to tumors and infection.
  30. 30. Stay PositiveStay Positive • Find the optimistic viewpoint in a negativeFind the optimistic viewpoint in a negative situation. ...situation. ... • Cultivate and live in a positive environment.Cultivate and live in a positive environment. ...... • Go slowly. ...Go slowly. ... • Don't make a mountain out of a molehill. ...Don't make a mountain out of a molehill. ... • Don't let vague fears hold you back fromDon't let vague fears hold you back from doing what you want. ...doing what you want. ... • Add value and positivity to someone else'sAdd value and positivity to someone else's life.life.
  31. 31. Maintain Close RelationshipsMaintain Close Relationships • Go out and meet new people.Go out and meet new people. • Stay involved with others.Stay involved with others. • Take classes.Take classes. • Volunteer.Volunteer. • Take someone out to dinner at a newTake someone out to dinner at a new restaurant.restaurant. • Get a pet.Get a pet. • Studies have shown that people live longerStudies have shown that people live longer and healthier with companionship.and healthier with companionship.
  32. 32. ……RelationshipsRelationships
  33. 33. Be SpiritualBe Spiritual • May be in a context separate from organizedMay be in a context separate from organized religious institutions.religious institutions. • Modern spirituality typically includes a belief inModern spirituality typically includes a belief in a supernatural (beyond the known and observable)a supernatural (beyond the known and observable) realmrealm • Personal growthPersonal growth • A quest for an ultimate/sacred meaning religiousA quest for an ultimate/sacred meaning religious experienceexperience • An encounter with one's own "inner dimension."An encounter with one's own "inner dimension."
  34. 34. Are religious people happier thanAre religious people happier than non-religious people?non-religious people? • The short answer is “yes”The short answer is “yes” • Studies show that religion gives people aStudies show that religion gives people a sense of purpose and ordersense of purpose and order • It serves as a resource for coping withIt serves as a resource for coping with negative life experiences and existential fearsnegative life experiences and existential fears (e.g., the fear of death).(e.g., the fear of death). • However, a number of studies really seem toHowever, a number of studies really seem to suggest that the magic ingredient in religionsuggest that the magic ingredient in religion that provides happiness is socialthat provides happiness is social connectednessconnectedness https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/more-mortal/201212/are-religious-people-happier-non-religious-people
  35. 35. Back to the Original Question…Back to the Original Question… What is Health?What is Health? • Is it a well functioning immune system?Is it a well functioning immune system? • TheThe immune systemimmune system is a host defenseis a host defense system comprising many biological structuressystem comprising many biological structures and processes within an organism thatand processes within an organism that protects against disease.protects against disease. • To function properly, an immune systemTo function properly, an immune system must detect a wide variety of agents, knownmust detect a wide variety of agents, known as pathogens, from viruses to parasiticas pathogens, from viruses to parasitic worms, and distinguish them from theworms, and distinguish them from the organism's own healthy tissue.organism's own healthy tissue.
  36. 36. Self and Non-SelfSelf and Non-Self • Your immune system has an amazingYour immune system has an amazing ability to distinguish between yourability to distinguish between your body's own cells (referred to as "body's own cells (referred to as " selfself")") and foreign cells ("and foreign cells (" nonselfnonself")."). • Each cell carries protein markers calledEach cell carries protein markers called antigens that identify itantigens that identify it asas selfself oror nonselfnonself..
  37. 37. Simplified Diagram ofSimplified Diagram of the Immune Systemthe Immune System
  38. 38. Is Health When Our DigestiveIs Health When Our Digestive System is Working Properly?System is Working Properly?
  39. 39. The Human MicrobiomeThe Human Microbiome Humans are colonized by many microorganisms; the traditional estimate is that the average human body is inhabited by ten times as many non-human cells as human cells, but more recent estimates have lowered that ratio to 3:1 or even to approximately the same number
  40. 40. The Human Microbiome ProjectThe Human Microbiome Project • was a United States National Institutes ofwas a United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) initiative with the goal of identifying andHealth (NIH) initiative with the goal of identifying and characterizing the microorganisms which are foundcharacterizing the microorganisms which are found in association with both healthy and diseasedin association with both healthy and diseased humans (the human microbiome).humans (the human microbiome). • Launched in 2008 it was a five-year project, bestLaunched in 2008 it was a five-year project, best characterized as a feasibility study, and had a totalcharacterized as a feasibility study, and had a total budget of $115 million.budget of $115 million. • The ultimate goal of this and similar NIH-The ultimate goal of this and similar NIH- sponsored microbiome projects was to test howsponsored microbiome projects was to test how changes in the human microbiome are associatedchanges in the human microbiome are associated with human health or disease.with human health or disease. • This topic is currently not well understood.This topic is currently not well understood. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_Microbiome_Project
  41. 41. Health - What about FinancialHealth - What about Financial Health?Health? • Are people who are well off financially,Are people who are well off financially, also healthier?also healthier? • What about health in wealthier nationsWhat about health in wealthier nations compared to less wealthy nations?compared to less wealthy nations?
  42. 42. Financial HealthFinancial Health • Is the state of one's personalIs the state of one's personal financialfinancial situation.situation. • There are many dimensions toThere are many dimensions to financialfinancial healthhealth, including:, including: – the amount of savings you havethe amount of savings you have – how much you are setting away for retirementhow much you are setting away for retirement – how much of your income you are spending onhow much of your income you are spending on fixed or non-discretionary expenses.fixed or non-discretionary expenses. www.investopedia.com/terms/f/financial-health.asp
  43. 43. Are People Saving for Retirement?Are People Saving for Retirement? • Many Americans are not prepared for retirement.Many Americans are not prepared for retirement. • In fact, "nearly half of families have no retirementIn fact, "nearly half of families have no retirement account savings at all," the Economic Policy Instituteaccount savings at all," the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) reported.(EPI) reported. • Just how much has the average American familyJust how much has the average American family saved up?saved up? • According to the EPI, the mean retirement savings ofAccording to the EPI, the mean retirement savings of all families is $95,776.all families is $95,776. http://www.cnbc.com/2016/09/12/heres-how-much-the-average-american-family-has-saved-for-retirement.html
  44. 44. How Money Affects HappinessHow Money Affects Happiness • ThereThere isis a strong correlation between wealth anda strong correlation between wealth and happiness:happiness: • ““Rich people and nations are happier than their poorRich people and nations are happier than their poor counterparts; don’t let anyone tell you differently.”counterparts; don’t let anyone tell you differently.” • But they note that money’s impact on happiness isn’tBut they note that money’s impact on happiness isn’t as large as you might think.as large as you might think. • If you have clothes to wear, food to eat, and a roofIf you have clothes to wear, food to eat, and a roof over your head, increased disposable income hasover your head, increased disposable income has just a small influence on your sense of well-being.just a small influence on your sense of well-being. https://www.safaribooksonline.com/library/view/your-money-the/9780596809430/ch01.html
  45. 45. The Fulfillment CurveThe Fulfillment Curve • American culture is consumption-driven.American culture is consumption-driven. • The media teaches you to want the clothesThe media teaches you to want the clothes and cars you see on TV and the watches andand cars you see on TV and the watches and jewelry you see in magazine ads.jewelry you see in magazine ads. • Yet studies show that people who areYet studies show that people who are materialistic tend to be less happy than thosematerialistic tend to be less happy than those who aren’t.who aren’t. • In other words, if you want to be content, youIn other words, if you want to be content, you should own—and want—less Stuff.should own—and want—less Stuff.
  46. 46. George Carlin’s “Stuff” RoutineGeorge Carlin’s “Stuff” Routine • https://youtu.be/MvgN5gCuLachttps://youtu.be/MvgN5gCuLac
  47. 47. The Medicalization and Isolation ofThe Medicalization and Isolation of DyingDying • During the second-half of the twentieth century theDuring the second-half of the twentieth century the burden of care, once assumed by neighbors, friends,burden of care, once assumed by neighbors, friends, and family, was passed onto strangers and medicaland family, was passed onto strangers and medical caretakers.caretakers. • The new sites of death which emerged, most notablyThe new sites of death which emerged, most notably the hospital and long-term care facility, enabled thethe hospital and long-term care facility, enabled the removal of unpleasant and horrifying sights of theremoval of unpleasant and horrifying sights of the dying process from ordinary social and culturaldying process from ordinary social and cultural experience.experience. • This transformation, whereby death was sequesteredThis transformation, whereby death was sequestered and institutionally confined, was attractive to a cultureand institutionally confined, was attractive to a culture that was increasingly fearful of dying.that was increasingly fearful of dying. http://innerself.com/content/personal/spirituality-mindfulness/death-a-dying/4341-fear-and-denial-of-death-by-david-wendell-moller.html
  48. 48. Death as FailureDeath as Failure • In the modern context in which dying has lost itsIn the modern context in which dying has lost its meaningfulness, death is viewed as failure.meaningfulness, death is viewed as failure. • This fact helps explain the great sense of shame andThis fact helps explain the great sense of shame and humiliation that dying persons and their loved ones feel.humiliation that dying persons and their loved ones feel. • Many physicians view death as defeat and failure on both aMany physicians view death as defeat and failure on both a personal and professional level.personal and professional level. • As long as dying is seen as shameful and death is viewed asAs long as dying is seen as shameful and death is viewed as failure, open and honest communication will be stymied.failure, open and honest communication will be stymied. • Simply, no one likes to talk about their shortcomings or failures.Simply, no one likes to talk about their shortcomings or failures. These, instead, are remanded to the isolated, invisible realm ofThese, instead, are remanded to the isolated, invisible realm of our collective human experience. That is to say, they are, inour collective human experience. That is to say, they are, in fact, denied.fact, denied.
  49. 49. Woody Allen and DeathWoody Allen and Death • I'm not afraid to die, I just don't want toI'm not afraid to die, I just don't want to be there when it happens.be there when it happens. – Woody AllenWoody Allen
  50. 50. Clarity of Vision in LifeClarity of Vision in Life • This is the first step in goal setting.This is the first step in goal setting. • The number one reason that people fail toThe number one reason that people fail to achieve their goals is; they lackachieve their goals is; they lack clarity ofclarity of visionvision about theabout the lifelife they want to live. ...they want to live. ... • These goals do not tie into a clearThese goals do not tie into a clear visionvision ofof thethe lifelife they wish to lead.they wish to lead. • They lack identity and purpose.They lack identity and purpose. https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=clarity+of+vision+in+life
  51. 51. Finding ClarityFinding Clarity • Confusion is solved by getting yourConfusion is solved by getting your priorities straight.priorities straight. • Distraction is solved by getting better atDistraction is solved by getting better at focusing your attention.focusing your attention. • Disorganization is solved by throwingDisorganization is solved by throwing out non-essentials and tending to theout non-essentials and tending to the important things first and foremost.important things first and foremost. Deepak Chopra https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/from-hazy-clear-how-gain-clarity-your-life-chopra-md-official--1
  52. 52. DODO • Make your surroundings orderly and uncluttered.Make your surroundings orderly and uncluttered. • Take a close look at stresses that need to beTake a close look at stresses that need to be addressed.addressed. • Keep away from negative influences.Keep away from negative influences. • Find a friend or confidante who shares you vision ofFind a friend or confidante who shares you vision of clarity and fulfillment.clarity and fulfillment. • Center yourself several times a day whenever youCenter yourself several times a day whenever you feel distracted or unsettled.feel distracted or unsettled. • Go outside to experience the calm and inspiration ofGo outside to experience the calm and inspiration of Nature.Nature. • Follow a regular daily routine.Follow a regular daily routine. • Get eight hours of good sleep every night.Get eight hours of good sleep every night.
  53. 53. DON’TDON’T • Remain in situations that turn disordered and stressful.Remain in situations that turn disordered and stressful. • Push your work time to the limit of exhaustion, mental orPush your work time to the limit of exhaustion, mental or physical.physical. • Be tied down by other people's opinions and attitudes.Be tied down by other people's opinions and attitudes. • Let stress go unaddressed.Let stress go unaddressed. • Let a good night's sleep slip by more than once or twice aLet a good night's sleep slip by more than once or twice a week.week. • Immerse yourself in bad news and the world's chaoticImmerse yourself in bad news and the world's chaotic unrest.unrest. • Ignore your body's signals--be aware of when it wantsIgnore your body's signals--be aware of when it wants rest, nourishment, down time, and a chance to reset itselfrest, nourishment, down time, and a chance to reset itself through meditation and quiet time alone.through meditation and quiet time alone. • Forget to provide yourself with pure food, water, and air.Forget to provide yourself with pure food, water, and air.
  54. 54. Finally, I feel that a definition ofFinally, I feel that a definition of Health might include :Health might include : • Clarity and a vision of LifeClarity and a vision of Life • With no fear of DeathWith no fear of Death
  55. 55. No Fear Of DeathNo Fear Of Death
  56. 56. Take in a deep breath…… and enjoy!!!!!

×