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Using Multiple Means of Open 
to Solve Global Food Safety Challenges 
Open Education Conference, Washington D.C., 20-Novem...
Global Food Safety Partnership 
• Public-private initiative dedicated to improving the safety 
of food in middle-income an...
Classic Approach & Challenges 
• Developed world provides standards, procedures, and 
practices 
• Education & training de...
GFSP Knowledge & Learning 
Working Group – Open 
Garin Fons 
Programs Manager 
Center for Open Educational Resources 
& La...
Open Models Concept Paper 
• Establish a framework and purpose for use of open 
practices by GFSP members 
• Create a big ...
GFSP Open Models Big Picture
China Case Example
Colombia Case Example
Recommendations/Next Steps 
• Pursue "openness" as an operating principle 
• GFSP partners adopt one or more of the 9 open...
Global Food Safety 
Knowledge Hub 
Local Food Safety 
Knowledge Hubs 
Architecture development by Nikos Manouselis, Chief ...
Local Food Safety 
Community Hubs 
Global Food 
Safety 
Community Hub 
Architecture development by Nikos Manouselis, Chief...
hub vs. centralized approach 
• information resides at site of provider 
– (metadata) descriptions exchanged, facilitate i...
Open Business Models 
• What is “open”? 
• What’s in it for me? 
• Why use an open model rather than a proprietary model? ...
Open Business Models 
Developed using 
an open process 
over 9 years, 
involving 470 co-authors 
from 45 
countries this 
...
Open Business Models 
• To have your own open business model 
designed contact Paul Stacey at Creative 
Common 
pstacey@cr...
Paul Stacey 
Associate Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons 
web site: http://creativecommons.org 
e-mail: pstace...
Using Multiple Means of Open to Solve Global Food Safety
Using Multiple Means of Open to Solve Global Food Safety
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Using Multiple Means of Open to Solve Global Food Safety

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Presentation given at Open Education Conference in Washington D.C. 20-Nov-2014.

Published in: Education

Using Multiple Means of Open to Solve Global Food Safety

  1. 1. Using Multiple Means of Open to Solve Global Food Safety Challenges Open Education Conference, Washington D.C., 20-November-2014 Paul Stacey, Associate Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons Except where otherwise noted these materials are licensed Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 (CC BY) Presentation based on Open Models Concept paper written by Paul Stacey, Garin Fons, and Theresa Bernardo. Paper available at: http://bit.ly/1rKij7w
  2. 2. Global Food Safety Partnership • Public-private initiative dedicated to improving the safety of food in middle-income and developing countries • Improve food safety skills, knowledge, and resources • Create economic opportunity for developing country food producers, food processors, and other agri-food businesses to participate in the global food value chain • Ensure safe food, increase food supply chain value, accelerate economic growth, alleviate rural poverty, and improve public health outcomes http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/agriculture/brief/global-food-safety-partnership
  3. 3. Classic Approach & Challenges • Developed world provides standards, procedures, and practices • Education & training delivered to country of need • Proprietary, profit-making, competing providers • Not coordinated, temporary, not localized • Challenging to build internal capacity, scale and sustain Can Open Make a Difference?
  4. 4. GFSP Knowledge & Learning Working Group – Open Garin Fons Programs Manager Center for Open Educational Resources & Language Learning (COERLL) University of Texas at Austin Theresa Bernardo Founder, One Health Knowledge Initiatives Associate Professor Epidemiology and Health Informatics Veterinary Medicine Michigan State University Chris Geith Assistant Provost & Executive Director Michigan State University MSUglobal Knowledge & Learning Innovations Paul Stacey Associate Director of Global Learning Creative Commons
  5. 5. Open Models Concept Paper • Establish a framework and purpose for use of open practices by GFSP members • Create a big picture Open Models engagement strategy and situate GFSP global and local stakeholders within it • Describe open practices stakeholders can adopt along with their associated value propositions • Portray case examples showing different paths through the open ecosystem and use of open practices • Bring forward a GFSP open policy recommendation • Recommend next steps Open Models Concept Paper http://bit.ly/1rKij7w
  6. 6. GFSP Open Models Big Picture
  7. 7. China Case Example
  8. 8. Colombia Case Example
  9. 9. Recommendations/Next Steps • Pursue "openness" as an operating principle • GFSP partners adopt one or more of the 9 open practices • Openly license all GFSP publicly funded deliverables with CC BY 4.0 license (or CC BY IGO 3.0 if IGO) • Establish a GFSP content & community platform See: http://www.slideshare.net/Agro-Know/gfsp-open-source-platform- for-food-safety-capacity-building • Identify resources partners currently have that could contribute to GFSP goals if openly licensed • Engage GFSP global network and public in use, reuse, and continuous improvement of openly licensed deliverables • Work with GFSP partners to define open business models
  10. 10. Global Food Safety Knowledge Hub Local Food Safety Knowledge Hubs Architecture development by Nikos Manouselis, Chief Executive Officer, Agro-Know see: http://www.slideshare.net/Agro-Know/gfsp-open-source-platform-for-food-safety-capacity-building Source diagram from Open Models concept paper: http://bit.ly/1p729Jm
  11. 11. Local Food Safety Community Hubs Global Food Safety Community Hub Architecture development by Nikos Manouselis, Chief Executive Officer, Agro-Know see: http://www.slideshare.net/Agro-Know/gfsp-open-source-platform-for-food-safety-capacity-building
  12. 12. hub vs. centralized approach • information resides at site of provider – (metadata) descriptions exchanged, facilitate information dissemination & demonstrator; same provenance & maintenance – powerful framework for multilingual information discovery • secure & safe way of exchanging information – define access, use, re-use rights & licenses – unique identification of information entities; Communication, Coordination, Collaboration, Educations and Training (CCCET) across disparate systems • enhancing existing sites/platforms with information – existing systems interoperable; not building yet-another-system – users discover more relevant data through platforms they already use
  13. 13. Open Business Models • What is “open”? • What’s in it for me? • Why use an open model rather than a proprietary model? • How will open models generate equivalent or greater revenue – how will we keep the lights on? • What is the business model for open? • How would I transition my business model to an open one? (in whole or in part) Show me the money! Open for business by Libby Levi CC BY-SA
  14. 14. Open Business Models Developed using an open process over 9 years, involving 470 co-authors from 45 countries this framework provides a practical starting point for depicting business models in general and designing open business models.
  15. 15. Open Business Models • To have your own open business model designed contact Paul Stacey at Creative Common pstacey@creativecommons.org Open for business by Libby Levi CC BY-SA
  16. 16. Paul Stacey Associate Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons web site: http://creativecommons.org e-mail: pstacey@creativecommons.org blog: http://edtechfrontier.com presentation slides: http://www.slideshare.net/Paul_Stacey https://www.facebook.com/creativecommons http://creativecommons.org/weblog

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