Risky, Edgy TeachingFlexible PGCE Conference 2011            Paul Smalley     Senior Lecturer in Education         Edge Hi...
Aimsa session of 9 practical lesson ideas,each with some sort of edgethings that have a risk of going wrong,but when they ...
Why not play it safe?In schools where behaviour was poor, this was frequentlylinked to dull and uninspired teaching.Ofsted...
Why not play it safe?People learn best when they are interested, involved and appropriately challenged bytheir work – when...
Menu1. Effective PowerPoint Stimulus - RE/Geography2. Maps from memory - Physics3. Demonstration - RE /Maths4. Mystery gam...
1. Effective StimulusWonderful World.ppt
1. Effective StimulusWhat are the risks?When could you use this?How could you use this technique inyour subject area?
2. Maps from memoryPrepare a pictureGet pupils into groups of 4 (can vary)Call out 1s – they have 30 seconds (can vary) to...
2. Maps from memoryWhat are the risks?When could you use this?Why does this work?
3. DemonstrationA picture (perhaps from an ICT source), a concrete object or ademonstration can add to the power of an exp...
Demonstrating reincarnation      with candles!What are the risks?How could you demonstrate fractions inMaths?Can you think...
4. Mystery gameOne ways to use mysteries is In twofairly big groups.Divide into two groups, both have thesame evidence on ...
4. Mystery gameWhat are the risks?How else can you use mystery games?Why do it this way?
5. Video and Media ClipsAt its best media from the „world‟ of thepupils is used to help pupils understandconcepts from the...
5. Video and Media ClipsShow the clip of Nemo‟s initiationAnalyse why it is a good ceremony – drawing outfrom the pupils t...
5. Video and Media Clips  Risk?  Engaging?  Think of an example from your subject area.  RE Examples –http://www.damaris.o...
6. Active readingDirected Activities Related to Text (DARTs)This term encompasses a range of structured andscaffolded acti...
6. Active readingDirected Activities Related to Text (DARTs)Highlight the KS3 History text for   Names   Jobs   Places...
6. Active readingToo safe – make it louder and more active!To teach the seven life processes in Science, startby rhythmica...
7. Guided FantasyGuided imagery originated in France, where itwas called "forced fantasy." It is a techniqueby which a per...
7. Guided FantasyHas links with Neuro-Linguistic Programming,meditation and psychology.Often used in well-beingCan promote...
7. Guided FantasyPractical Risks?Theoretical Risks?Could this be used in your subject?
8. Large Scale Role PlayBasically I had this mad idea to combineCitizenship (Crown Court) and puttingJesus on trial for fr...
9. Paper Dart PlenaryFold paper into paper plane.Write on one thing you have learnt thislesson.When I say throw the plane....
Diamond 9As a four agree put the cards on thesheet in order of risk.Which will have the best results?Which are you most li...
Aimsa session of 9 practical lesson ideas,each with some sort of edgethings that have a risk of going wrong,but when they ...
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Risky, edgy teaching

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Risky, edgy teaching

  1. 1. Risky, Edgy TeachingFlexible PGCE Conference 2011 Paul Smalley Senior Lecturer in Education Edge Hill Universitysmalleyp@edgehill.ac.uk 07952884795
  2. 2. Aimsa session of 9 practical lesson ideas,each with some sort of edgethings that have a risk of going wrong,but when they go right are brilliantsome solid lesson ideas that you can tryout in the next week or two
  3. 3. Why not play it safe?In schools where behaviour was poor, this was frequentlylinked to dull and uninspired teaching.Ofsted Annual Report 09-10 (2010)teachers lacked confidence and were reluctant to risk newapproachesOfsted Transforming Religious Education (2010)In the lessons seen in the secondary schools during thesurvey, the most frequent strengths included….using avariety of imaginative approachesOfsted The National Strategies: a review of impact (2010)Safe = boring = unchallenging
  4. 4. Why not play it safe?People learn best when they are interested, involved and appropriately challenged bytheir work – when they are engaged with their learning.Engagement is about promoting those approaches to teaching and learning that helppupils understand subject knowledge and its application and that demand their activeparticipation.Where pupils are actively engaged in their learning, they: • have a longer concentration span; • complete work on time; • stay on-task and have few behaviour problems; • maintain a good attendance record.Consequently, they: • develop higher self-esteem; • make faster progress; • develop a belief in their ability to improve and learn; • encourage and work well with other pupils. Pedagogy and Practice: Teaching and Learning in Secondary Schools: Unit 11: Active Engagement Techniques (DfES, 2004) Safe = boring = unchallenging
  5. 5. Menu1. Effective PowerPoint Stimulus - RE/Geography2. Maps from memory - Physics3. Demonstration - RE /Maths4. Mystery game - PSHE5. Using video clips – RE / Business Studies6. Active reading – History /Science7. Guided Fantasy - French8. Large scale role-play - Citizenship9. Paper dart plenary
  6. 6. 1. Effective StimulusWonderful World.ppt
  7. 7. 1. Effective StimulusWhat are the risks?When could you use this?How could you use this technique inyour subject area?
  8. 8. 2. Maps from memoryPrepare a pictureGet pupils into groups of 4 (can vary)Call out 1s – they have 30 seconds (can vary) to lookat the picture.After 30 seconds number 2s have 30 seconds to lookat the picture, while number1s draw.Repeat for 3s and 4s and allow extra time at the end.Each group should have a perfect facsimile of theoriginal picture
  9. 9. 2. Maps from memoryWhat are the risks?When could you use this?Why does this work?
  10. 10. 3. DemonstrationA picture (perhaps from an ICT source), a concrete object or ademonstration can add to the power of an explanation as itcaptures attention and focuses pupils‟ minds. Again it is usefulfor visual learners. For example, a balloon is a useful resourcein geography for explaining air pressure differences. Givingpupils objects they can hold and examine also helps. Forexample, providing each pupil with a sedimentary rock will helpwhen explaining characteristic features of the rocks.Pedagogy and Practice: Teaching and Learning in Secondary Schools: Unit 8: Explaining (DfES, 2004)So let me demonstrate reincarnation.
  11. 11. Demonstrating reincarnation with candles!What are the risks?How could you demonstrate fractions inMaths?Can you think of any otherdemonstrations of abstract ideas in yoursubject?
  12. 12. 4. Mystery gameOne ways to use mysteries is In twofairly big groups.Divide into two groups, both have thesame evidence on either yellow or bluecards.The winners are the team which hasthe best answer, making greatest use ofthe evidence in a given time.
  13. 13. 4. Mystery gameWhat are the risks?How else can you use mystery games?Why do it this way?
  14. 14. 5. Video and Media ClipsAt its best media from the „world‟ of thepupils is used to help pupils understandconcepts from the syllabus.A Business Studies Example “What is aMarket?” – Use Harry & Paul in theDragon’s Den http://youtu.be/gIgZ66DlkKIAn RE example: in a lesson on “Is BarMitzvah a good initiation ceremony?” – useFinding Nemo.
  15. 15. 5. Video and Media ClipsShow the clip of Nemo‟s initiationAnalyse why it is a good ceremony – drawing outfrom the pupils that: this ceremony marked Nemo becoming one of the gang - initiation. it was a relatively simple task that was built up into a big thing. the task was relevant - Nemo had a weak fin but needed to be a good swimmer in order to escapeRepeat the process with a video of a Bar Mitzvah
  16. 16. 5. Video and Media Clips Risk? Engaging? Think of an example from your subject area. RE Examples –http://www.damaris.org/relessonsonline/index2.phphttp://www.farmington.ac.uk/documents/new_reports/ME17.pdf
  17. 17. 6. Active readingDirected Activities Related to Text (DARTs)This term encompasses a range of structured andscaffolded activities that guide readers to developunderstanding, familiarity, and successful learningexperiences by reading and writing.For me the purpose of DARTs is to enhance andincrease student engagement with textual materialsPioneered by researchers at Nottingham University(Lunzer and Gardner, 1979, 1984).Scientists see Davies and Greenes Reading forLearning in the Sciences (1984)
  18. 18. 6. Active readingDirected Activities Related to Text (DARTs)Highlight the KS3 History text for Names Jobs Places Three Key VerbsGive each paragraph a sub-heading.Draw a map or flowchart of the story.
  19. 19. 6. Active readingToo safe – make it louder and more active!To teach the seven life processes in Science, startby rhythmically chanting some poetry.Do the same with the key text.Give each pair a verse, they read it out emphasisingkey words.They create an action for each key word.Perform it as a whole class.
  20. 20. 7. Guided FantasyGuided imagery originated in France, where itwas called "forced fantasy." It is a techniqueby which a person is started on a daydreamand then allowed to finish on his own. The"guide" will start to tell a story (called a"script“). This is done in a group and thendiscussed afterward by the participants.My experience is that children love to do thissort of exercise, if only as an opportunity to„chill out‟.
  21. 21. 7. Guided FantasyHas links with Neuro-Linguistic Programming,meditation and psychology.Often used in well-beingCan promote spirituality – key grade in newOfsted framework.Begins with „stilling‟
  22. 22. 7. Guided FantasyPractical Risks?Theoretical Risks?Could this be used in your subject?
  23. 23. 8. Large Scale Role PlayBasically I had this mad idea to combineCitizenship (Crown Court) and puttingJesus on trial for fraud (the resurrection).
  24. 24. 9. Paper Dart PlenaryFold paper into paper plane.Write on one thing you have learnt thislesson.When I say throw the plane.Add something you have learnt to theplane you catch- repeat twice.At the end give throw them all to me.
  25. 25. Diamond 9As a four agree put the cards on thesheet in order of risk.Which will have the best results?Which are you most likely to try?
  26. 26. Aimsa session of 9 practical lesson ideas,each with some sort of edgethings that have a risk of going wrong,but when they go right are brilliantsome solid lesson ideas that you can tryout in the next week or two

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