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Walk/Live St. Louis: Elected Officials & Staff Event

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Dan Burden presents to St. Louis elected officials and staff as part of the Walk/Live St. Louis 2012 event on June 29th, 2012.

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Walk/Live St. Louis: Elected Officials & Staff Event

  1. 1. THE POWER OF DesiredCOLLECTIVE IMPACT Outcomes Transformative Projects New Collaborations Identify Opportunities Walk/Live St. Louis 2012 EPA Grant – West End CONNECTING THE DOTS... REALTORS –> New Partners for Smart GrowthNeed for a more walkable St. Louis
  2. 2. Livability and therole ofTransportation
  3. 3. Now that we are here …What can we do?
  4. 4. Is this the landscape we want to leave our children?
  5. 5. Cottonwood, CA Main Street
  6. 6. Not Walkable WalkableHigh Car Dependency Low Car DependencySerious Congestion Moderate Congestion
  7. 7. “There is No There There” …Gertrude SteinHouston, Texas Fifty percent of all American cities are now under concrete and asphalt. (In Los Angeles it is now 66 percent.)
  8. 8. tesy of Ian Lockwood
  9. 9. tesy of Ian Lockwood
  10. 10. tesy of Ian Lockwood
  11. 11. tesy of Ian Lockwood
  12. 12. Cycle of Automobile Dependency For much of the last century transportation and land use planning practices supported a self-reinforcing cycle of increased automobile dependency and sprawl.
  13. 13. Why wecannotbuild ourway outof trafficVehicle miles traveled (VMT) around the U.S. have increasedby 70 percent over the last 20 years, compared with a twopercent increase in new highway construction. The U.S.General Accounting Office predicts that road congestion inthe U.S. will triple in 15 years even if capacity is increasedby 20 percent.Traffic is growing about five times faster than the growth inpopulation.(Data compiled for a report to the U.S. Department of Transportation in 2006 writtenby Stephen Polzin, (transportation researcher at the University of South Florida in
  14. 14. Land Use & Transportation – Ideal Traffic Planning Widen 20-Year Forecast Capacity Years
  15. 15. Land Use & Transportation – The Reality Actual Widen Induced Traffic Forecast Capacity Years
  16. 16. A B a la n c e d T r a n s p o r t a t io n A p p r o a c h More Roads More Lanes Management Transit System Bicycling ITS Walking HOV/HOT Lanes More More User View and ComfortPavement Car-Carrying Context-Sensitive Design Capacity l ve Traffic Calming a Tr Personal Security rs of Ca y lit ua ot Intensify land use densities ,N Q Promote Mixed Use Development se Conventional Approach ple More Cars iles ea Transit Supportive Development eo er M cr In w eP Demand Management – Pricing, , Fe e-commerce, telecommuting, etc… pl e v o Mo s Pe L es ve Mo Shift Policy Lane Limits Change Standards Lateral Approach
  17. 17. Chain of Impacts Widen Road FIRST Reduce Reduce ORDER Delay CostSECOND Move Range Drive Own More ORDER Home Farther More CarsTHIRD Lose More Increased Higher IncreasedORDER Communit Big Inactivity Business & y Box Epidemic VMT Energy Carbon Household Jobs Disinvestm Demand Footprint Transportat ent ion Costs
  18. 18. Canada Marine Drive, Dundarave, B.C.Highway 93, Missoula, Montana USA
  19. 19. Marine Drive, Dundarave, B.C.
  20. 20. Back-In Parking, withRoad Diet on East Side
  21. 21. Colorized Bike Lanes
  22. 22. Combination Super Sharrow(Green Sharrow Lane), withRoad Diet on East Side
  23. 23. Combination Super Sharrow(Green Sharrow Lane), withRoad Diet on East Side (Low domed or cobbled crossing median) is added
  24. 24. Pedestrian Crossing
  25. 25. Driveway Access, withRoad Diet on East Side
  26. 26. You Know When You Have Left Claremont Claremont, California
  27. 27. Bridgeport Way, University Place, Washington
  28. 28. Marine Drive, Dundarave, B.C.
  29. 29. Bridgeport (1999)
  30. 30. The Average U.S. Family now pays $16,000 per year in health care costs, and this figure is rising.With almost double the costper capita of the averageWestern nations, the U.S.receives less in the way ofhealth care and healthoutcomes.This makes us vulnerable inglobal competitionSource: The Kaiser Family Foundation, April
  31. 31. Action Question #1 If driving more than 20 miles per day is not sustainable, how do we get back to 1985 levels.Driving more miles eachyear (like obesity) is avisible symptom, anindicator of a diseasethat is running amuck ineach of our towns andvillages.
  32. 32. Aging Population 1990 2050
  33. 33. Depressive Disorders 19 million American adults • Leading cause of disability in the USA • Treatment: • Medication • Social Contact, including therapy • And…..
  34. 34. “There is No There There” …Gertrude SteinHouston, Texas Fifty percent of all American cities are now under concrete and asphalt. (In Los Angeles it is now 66 percent.)
  35. 35. Cost Comparisons Suburban vs. Urban Housing Transportation Costs Costs TotalNew York City 37.1% 15.1% 52.2% Tampa 31.1% 25.1% 56.4%
  36. 36. What got us into this mess?Many things -- No one is innocentBankers bundled and traded 500 shoppingcenters at a time, designed, not for “place”but to fit their definition of profitability.Bankers bundled 5,000 homes at a time, allat set price points requiring 3 bedrooms and2 baths. This was at a time when theaverage American family shrunk to 2.1.As consumers we drove up house sizes to2200 square feetThe highway guys built the roads tonowhere.
  37. 37. Cost Comparisons Suburban vs. Urban Housing Transportation Costs Costs TotalNew York City 37.1% 15.1% 52.2% Tampa 31.1% 25.1% 56.4%
  38. 38. Residential c. 1935 Office 1980’s Retail Retail ResidentialTysons Corner, VA
  39. 39. Residential Office Retail Historic Architecture Trees Civic Statue Sidewalks Public SpaceWashington, DC
  40. 40. Fargo, North Dakota
  41. 41. Fargo, North Dakota
  42. 42. These are Cottages?
  43. 43. Such places do not sprout byhappenstance. Driven by irresistible economic forces and shaped by subtly shifting social patterns, they are being created, down to the tiniest detail, by a handful of major developers with a master plan forthe new America. …. NY Times, August 15, 2005
  44. 44. Ten Steps To WalkabilityC o mp a c t, M a n y p e o p leliv e ly t o w n o f a ll a g e sc e nte r a n d a b ilit ie sLow s peed w a lk in g m a n ys tre e ts , hoursd is t r ib u t e d C e le b r a t e dv o lu m e s p u b lic s p a c e a n d p u b licF in e g r a in e d lif e , p a r a d e s ,s tre e ts , ma rk e ts ,m a n y t r a ils , f e s t iv a ls ,t r a n s it lin k s P u b lic La nd us e a w a rds p la c e s w it h a ndN e ig h b o r in v it in g tra ns p o rta tihood fe a tu re s : ons c h o o ls be nc he s , A f fa r tdnaeb lseh i p p or r ,a nd re s tro o ms , i nss p i r i n g ,pa rks , C h a d e ,n w a tt e r s onv ie n , w e llw it h in o n e s a f e aar n d a nd t m a in t a in e dq ua rte r s tre e ts a nd
  45. 45. Future Growth Area - Salinas General Plan
  46. 46. Circulation
  47. 47. Open Space
  48. 48. Town Centers
  49. 49. NeighborhoodCenters, Schools
  50. 50. Townhouses frame the square while open space provides an outdoor environment for The largest lots of nearby residents the TND can be at the edgeCivic buildingsShould beterminate street oropen space vistas In these cases where The intensity of a TND is bordered by a uses should principal street higher gravitate away intensity uses such as from the medium density neighborhood housing can be used in center creating the edge Based on the 1928 drawings by James Perry
  51. 51. If Cities are toreduce auto-dependence aworking alternativeshould include:Developers nolonger block accessto those placespeople want toreach.
  52. 52. Meriam Park, Chico, California
  53. 53. Size neighborhoods for a 5-minute walk Design for a mix of land uses: Make blocks a walkable size:Neighborhood Centers • Block perimeters of 1,500’ to 2,000’ • Create a connected network of streets Civic Parks Centers include denser Buildings and Open housing, a square, civic Spaces uses, and neighborhood- oriented retail.
  54. 54. External Trips 95% InternalTrips Internal Trips 60-90% 100%
  55. 55. Arrowood – Existing Conditions
  56. 56. Arrowood Bicycle Vision
  57. 57. ARROWOODURBAN DESIGN VISION
  58. 58. Significant reduction in VMT as we go from Land Use Pattern Affectsunits/acre to over 20 units/acre 3-4 Travel 8.0 Higher Density can reduce Vehicle Trips 6.0 Trips / Household (ADT) 7-10 du/a Vehicle Trips 2-3 du/a 4.0 20 du/a 2.0Walking Trips 0.0 11-18 du/a 0.0 20.0 40.0 60.0 80.0 100.0 120.0 6-7 du/a in Units/Acre Density Source: John Holtzclaw, PhD, Sierra Club
  59. 59. Connectivity Requirements - Examples Link-node ratio of 1.44 Virginia DOT
  60. 60. Connectivity RequirementsCompact Area Type for Network Additions• Link-Node Ratio of 1.6 or greater• One external connection as well as an additional external connection and stub-out per 50 links or fraction thereof Virginia DOT
  61. 61. Connectivity RequirementsSuburban Area Type for Network Additions• Link-Node Ratio of 1.4 or greater• One external connection as well as an additional external connection and stub-out per 50 links or fraction thereof Virginia DOT
  62. 62. Rubber Band PlanningCut and Place Strings Pin actual travel routes Mark Needed Changes
  63. 63. Rubber Band Planning
  64. 64. Rubber Band Planning
  65. 65. Rubber Band Planning
  66. 66. Infill Mixed Use Vacant lots and under- used spaces become active centers New and added “eyes” on our important parks, corners and principle streets. Attractive new features and a way to pay for upgrades to our intersections Great new convenient places to have coffee or simply hang out in a quasi public-private place
  67. 67. Davis, California
  68. 68. Well DesignedWhat are the problems here? Density Urban-Advantage.comLack of Security Auto dependenceLack of people No place to buy a popsicleLack of investment Lack of diversityLack of diversity Lack of activity
  69. 69. University Place, Washington
  70. 70. Winter Park Village T he B reakdown
  71. 71. Le e RK Ma rt d. S o e la Av e nu n o a rl a nd A O v e . W W in t e r P a r k eb st er Vo Te c h W in t e r P a r k Av e. V illa g e r. D n g ni en D
  72. 72. Lee Road Mixed Use Extension Redevelopment Le e RK Ma rt d. e Av e nu o rl a nd O W eb st er W in t e r P a r k Av e. V illa g e r. Residential D W.P.V. g Redevelopment n Development ni en D
  73. 73. Not a good p la c e S e n io r s Poor Not a L o c a t io good n Okfo r Lo ay p la c eS hoppi c p e o p le n g f o r a t io B eP la z a Sh Ln s w it h Pl op fo o c t d is a b ilit i a z p in r a t a S hg io es P o n la p za p in g Not a good p la c e f o r Not a m u lt i- good f a m ily p la c e f o r the to w n h a ll
  74. 74. An auto driven policy design for housing. This is ugly, wasteful ofland, and it does not orient to transit
  75. 75. An transit driven policy design for housing. This is sociable,oriented to the transit stop, and the living space works for all.
  76. 76. If Cities are toreduce auto-dependence aworkingalternative shouldinclude:Buildings nolonger “moon” thestreet
  77. 77. Single-Use Commercial Buildings
  78. 78. New Port Village, Port Moody
  79. 79. New Port Village, Port Moody
  80. 80. N Roswell, Georgia 3,260 miles of roads . Rd le bb Ho H a cr uz ds u e r Ha eR Crabappl e Rd. d. d Hembree Rd. Cr os sv ill e R d y. . w a H W W oo o ett ds d har to ck Alp k Rd . . Pin 400 e G ro ve Rd R d. . Ala Old H ol co m b Br id . ge y Hw R d. tta rie Ma Riv ea A zal er s e ide id Rd R . .
  81. 81. N Roswell, Georgia 3,260 miles of roads 760 miles connect . Rd le bb Ho H Only 22% of a cr uz ds u e r Ha eR Crabappl e Rd. roads are doing d. d Hembree Rd. Cr os sv ill e R the heavy lifting d y. . w a H W W oo o ett ds d har to ck Alp k Rd . . Pin 400 e G ro ve Rd R d. . Ala Old H ol co m b Br id . ge y Hw R d. tta rie Ma Riv ea A zal er s e ide id Rd R . .
  82. 82. 32nd STREET BARRICADE
  83. 83. 32nd STREET BARRICADE
  84. 84. 42nd STREET BARRICADE
  85. 85. 42nd STREET BARRICADE
  86. 86. 2006 VOLUMES
  87. 87. 2030 VOLUMESW/OUT CONNECTORS
  88. 88. 2030 VOLUMESWITH CONNECTORS
  89. 89. Grosse Point Park, Michigan
  90. 90. Connectivity Requirements - Examples Link- node ratio of 1.44 Virg
  91. 91. Connectivity RequirementsCompact Area Type for Network Additions• Link-Node Ratio of 1.6 or greater• One external connection as well as an additional external connection and stub-out per 50 links or fraction thereof Virg
  92. 92. 250 125 75 21 15
  93. 93. Monterey, California Cleveland, Ohio.
  94. 94. Monterey, California
  95. 95. What is the Purpose of Cities?
  96. 96. How Do I get There (Wayfinding andOrientation) navigation  Wayfinding and  Does the design of this station, equipment and layout get me there?
  97. 97. 8-10 du/a net 11-12 du/a net
  98. 98. Meriam Park, Chico, California
  99. 99. Complete Streets
  100. 100. Chico, CANord Avenue
  101. 101. Crossing Island Bike LanesTransit Stop Turn Lane Colorized (colorized)
  102. 102. Washington’s First Roundabout was placed at a school
  103. 103. Every blizzard proves motorists prefer two lane roadsIndeed they place medians and edge buffers on 4-lane roads when they get
  104. 104. Abbott Road, E. Lansing, Michigan
  105. 105. California Street, Mountain View, California
  106. 106. Speed reductions of 3-7 Hartford, Connecticut
  107. 107. This: One less travel lane; bike lanes; parallel to back-in This 5-lane Main on one side; new pavement diagonal parking Street was converted to…Pottstown PA
  108. 108. If Cities are toreduce auto-dependence aworking alternativeshould include:Streets mustbecome “right-sized” for their
  109. 109. LaJolla Boulevard, Birdrock, San Diego, CA
  110. 110. LaJolla Boulevard, Birdrock, San Diego, CA
  111. 111. LaJolla Boulevard, Birdrock, San Diego, CA
  112. 112. LaJolla Boulevard, Birdrock, San Diego, CA
  113. 113. LaJolla Boulevard, Birdrock, San Diego, CA
  114. 114. LaJolla Boulevard, Birdrock, San Diego, CA
  115. 115. LaJolla Boulevard, Birdrock, San Diego, CA
  116. 116. 2nd Avenue, South
  117. 117. The Institute teamsuggests the followinggoals for towns/cities:Goal 1: A completenetwork of streets andpublic spaces tosupport active livingGoal 2: Safe, naturaland enjoyable walkingand biking conditionsGoal 3: Sustainabletransportation choicesGoal 4: Healthier,happier people
  118. 118. To achieve these goals,we recommend:1. Adopt Complete Streets policiesand incorporate Complete Streetspolicy language into all planningdocuments 2. Create and adopt the Livable Street Design Guidelines 3. Develop a Regional Pedestrian Master Plan 4. Adopt the Regional Bicycle Master Plan 5. Increase enforcement for pedestrian safety
  119. 119. 6. Increase education andawareness for all road users7. Improve and enhance SafeRoutes to School programs8. Update General Plans andMunicipal Codes to includelivability and wellness principles9. Transform regional corridors,local corridors and neighborhoodstreets to encourage activetransportation10. Apply best practices, lessonslearned and available resources toimprove livability throughout theregion
  120. 120. A Model Design Manual for Living StreetsMade possible by funding from the Department of Health and Human Services through the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
  121. 121. Goal 1: Build Multi-Modal CommunitiesPrioritize development ofmulti-modal communitiesthat provide residents of allages and abilities, andeconomic levels with safe,reliable, comfortable andeconomical transportationchoices. Made possible by funding from the Department of Health and Human Services through the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
  122. 122. Goal 2: Promote Safety transportation system to reduce serious injuries, decrease Design, operate, and manage the crime and violence, ensure mobility for all ages, abilities and socio-economic levels.Made possible by funding from the Department of Health and Human Services through the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
  123. 123. Goal 3: Design for Health Design, operate, manage streetscapes and public spaces to promote active living and lessen exposure to air and noise pollution and water and soil contamination.Made possible by funding from the Department of Health and Human Services through the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
  124. 124. Goal 4: PromoteTransportationInvestment asEconomic DevelopmentInvest in transportationimprovements-includingoperational improvements-that support the economichealth and competiveness ofcity’s businesses, and thesafety and general welfare ofits residents.Made possible by funding from the Department of Health and Human Services through the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
  125. 125. Goal 5: Integrate Transportation and Land Use Cities and counties should coordinate transportation infrastructure with land use and development.Made possible by funding from the Department of Health and Human Services through the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
  126. 126. Goal 6: Embrace Streets as Civic Space City streets will be regarded as important spaces for civic engagement and will be developed to promote health, economic vitality, and well-being while reflecting a city’s unique character.Made possible by funding from the Department of Health and Human Services through the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.

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