Pm#3818104v1 B Osh Leadership Coaching Pilot Swr Presentation To Rmt

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  • Why important
    Effective safety leadership drives safety performance
    We recognised that safety performance is driven by effective safety leadership.
    Need capable supervisors to lead safety culture
    That we would never improve our safety performance without building the capability and capacity of our frontline supervisors to lead and embed safety into the culture of the coalface.
    As managers we needed to strongly support this initiative.
    This is also reflected in the organisations OCI performance and individual leaders LSI’s.
    Enhanced EQ & personal accountability at coalface
    This program enhanced our leaders emotional maturity and intelligence to deal with changes, take personal accountability (above the line) and provided an on the ground “leg up” to cultural change
    Leverage success of Safety Leadership Training
    OSH Supervisor Coaching project pilot built on the success of the Safety Leadership Training in giving coachees practical support and guidance in the application of the Safety Leadership tools
    Identify & address workplace development issues
    Encourages coachees to embrace their strengths and knowledge, and pass these onto others in their team through formal and informal channels
    Allows Coachees to identify issues that they may not be comfortable talking to their supervisor about, and then which can subsequently be addressed (for example, taking on a supervisory role without adequate support, training and mentoring)
  • The purpose of this short term project was to “engage with supervisors and foremen and work with them on areas that are roadblocks that prevent them from being fully effective in their role (both in safety and in general management).”
  • Program Design
    Program was designed to provide a minimum of four sessions of coaching to the participants. The program pilot has evolved to span a timeframe of twelve weeks, where coachees are encouraged to participate in as many sessions as they would like or are able.
    Generally each session with the coachee has been from fifty to ninety minutes depending on circumstances.
  • Deliverables
    Minimum of four meetings with the safety coach
    Documented statement for self of what the behaviour shift looks like and what the supervisor is wanting to change / achieve over the sessions
    Report on cohort data by the safety coach for the Regional Lead Team to enable them to determine if the pilot has been a success in their Region
    The coachees could bring any issue, personal or work related, to the table. What was requested was that one third of the conversation be focussed on safety issues. A tool that was used to initiate discussion was the OSH Leadership Maturity Matrix
  • Average participation rate of…
    What hindered participation – leave, illness, work, sufficient coaching received, not interested
    What needs to be improved
    Coaching was not marketed effectively by mgt
    Mgt need to be more familiar with coaching advantages, experience and expected outcomes to market better and also to support coachees ongoing
  • Average participation rate of…
    What hindered participation – leave, illness, work, sufficient coaching received, not interested
    What needs to be improved
    Coaching was not marketed effectively by mgt
    Mgt need to be more familiar with coaching advantages, experience and expected outcomes to market better and also to support coachees ongoing
  • 19 coachees have had 4 or more sessions;
    12 coachees have had 6 or more
  • At the commencement of each session the coach invites the coachee to reflect on their past week and to complete an Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) which indicates how people are going in the following areas of their life-individually, interpersonally, socially and overall. The ORS gives weight to how life impacts the workplace whether it is the flu, trouble at home, general lack of motivation and in our present context in the South West, how the changes will impact on everyone’s lives. If people do not come to work with a general sense of well being on a regular basis, their performance suffers and the cultural environment deteriorates.
    At the completion of the session coachees then complete a Session Rating Scale (SRS) which gives immediate feedback on the session as to relationship with coach, goals and topics, approach and method and the overall “rightness” of the session.
    The purpose of this Feedback Informed Coaching (ORS and SRS) is to enable the coach to use evidence based practice in a way that immediately enables an adjustment by the coach for more effective measurable coachee outcomes at the next session.
  • Question asked:
    Looking back over the last week, including today, help us understand how you have been doing in the following areas of your life:
    Individually (personal well being)
    Interpersonally (family, close relationships)
    Socially (work, school, friendships)
    Overall (sense of well being)
    <25 indicates stress, illness, etc. This was evident in all of the readings that were below 25.
    The orange person scoring between 16 and 19 was under high stress at work and the situation is now being managed more effectively. Other instances were attitudinal or illness related.
    General trend of increasing wellbeing over the duration of the coaching program indicates coaching effectiveness on improving wellbeing.
  • Question asked:
    Please rate todays session by placing a mark on the line nearest the description that best fits your coaching experience:
    Relationship (-/+ feeling heard, understood, respected)
    Goals and Topics (-/+ worked on and talked about what I wanted to)
    Approach or Method (-/+ coach fit good for me)
    Overall (-/+ session was right for me today)
    If coach scores below 35 the following session will commence with a discussion about what can be done better this time. General trend of increasing scores indicate that coaching approach was a good fit for our employees
  • Feedback from coachees at the end of the coaching program on the benefits they had experienced personally by participating in the coaching program.
  • They were asked to chose one or more aspects to work on
    Key factors x number of our staff identified as being important were :
    High scoring
    Refer to handout for comments on how they improved
  • They were asked to chose one or more aspects to work on
    Key factors x number of our staff identified as being important were :
    High scoring
    Refer to handout for comments on how they improved
  • What’s it telling us?
    Clarity – I was clear about the coaching process, roles and what was required
    Relationship with Coach – I felt heard, understood and respected
    Goals and Topics – We worked on and talked about what I wanted to
    Enabling – The ideas and options generated were useful to me in my role
    Approach – The coaches approach was a good fit for me
    Overall – I have gained skills and insights which I will use to improve my results
    Overall – I would recommend this coaching process to others
    Overall – Additional coaching is not required at the conclusion of this program
    Scores are predominately >80%. One participant scored lower for a coupel pf the factors, but this was not considered to be statistically significant.
    Due to the variation of the “additional coaching” score, and feedback received from participants, it was determined that follow up sessions would be available to coachees at approx +3 and +6 months. This will give coachees an opportunity to embed learnings and reflect and celebrate the shifts they have made since commencing the program.
  • Outcomes (feedback received from coachees post Safety Leadership Training at week 9)
    Testimonials from coachees
    Participants are highly complementary of the program and would recommend this to their peers (evidence)
    There has been feedback from some employees that they have noticed a difference in the approach of their supervisor
    Osmosis of tools and approach to their staff which includes asking for 360 feedback on leadership styles and empowering and encouraging their team in safety matters
    Increased awareness and willingness of the benefits of coaching to deal with work and life issues
    Enhanced understanding of team leaders safety and management accountabilities
    Willingness amongst some coachees to adapt their leadership style to one that was more constructive and held people accountable – broadened peoples perceptions in how they think about things and enables them to stop & think
    Leaders engage more effectively with staff and others
    Increased leadership effectives including
    Increased communication and trust in teams
    Identification of performance gaps in terms of fulfilling OSH accountabilities of the individual
    Expanded project from safety focus to all encompassing employee development
    Helped some coachees through the emotions of challenging change projects
    Helped coachees recognise and celebrate their own strengths, and sharing their knowledge an experience in structured and unstructured ways (eg. mentors)
    Coaching was initially seen as an opportunity, not necessarily a problem solving mechanism. It can enable people to embrace change more readily
    Graphs – quantitative evidence
  • Based on our experience and findings, our recommendations are that:
    A 12 week program is recommended for subsequent Regions – any less than this would not achieve the desired outcomes
    A strong lead time will enable effective marketing and building awareness of the program. This would include meeting with the lead team to build a rapport with the coach at least 2 months prior to the coaching program to develop their understanding of the coaching process, the potential advantages to their teams and build their capability to on-sell the program to their employees
    Strong management support is required for the success of the coaching process
    Managers need to be able to coach to effectively maintain the momentum of the program. Ideally it would be good to have all managers participate in some form of coaching prior to the program so that they can relate to the experience of coaching to their staff, as well as opening communication channels
    Need to have a coordinator in the Region to work with the coach, the management team and the coachees. It is essential that this ties in to a holistic leadership program in the Region and does not stand alone. This was on of the main reasons of success of the coaching in the SWR
    Where appropriate, coachees will have done the Safety Leadership Program and the LSI to have awareness of the tools and awareness of themselves
    OSH Maturity matrix may be used pre/post coaching to assist in determining the effectiveness of the program for the individual and the organisation
    That the Coach be flexible in the delivery of the program so far as employees can pick a time (within reason) to fit their work commitments
    Coach should be a contractor to the organisation, not an employee as it can be perceived as just another imposed program, rather than a supportive program for the participants (policeman)
    Selection of the appropriate coach is one of the most critical success factors according to coachees
    A follow up coaching session in 2 – 3 months with coachees will set up an informal contract with coachees to continue to their safety leadership journey. EG. The coach may be available 1 day a week for a month to reconnect with coachees and also introduce new coachees to the concepts and coaching experience.
  • Based on our experience and findings, our recommendations are that:
    A 12 week program is recommended for subsequent Regions – any less than this would not achieve the desired outcomes
    A strong lead time will enable effective marketing and building awareness of the program. This would include meeting with the lead team to build a rapport with the coach at least 2 months prior to the coaching program to develop their understanding of the coaching process, the potential advantages to their teams and build their capability to on-sell the program to their employees
    Strong management support is required for the success of the coaching process
    Managers need to be able to coach to effectively maintain the momentum of the program. Ideally it would be good to have all managers participate in some form of coaching prior to the program so that they can relate to the experience of coaching to their staff, as well as opening communication channels
    Need to have a coordinator in the Region to work with the coach, the management team and the coachees. It is essential that this ties in to a holistic leadership program in the Region and does not stand alone. This was on of the main reasons of success of the coaching in the SWR
    Where appropriate, coachees will have done the Safety Leadership Program and the LSI to have awareness of the tools and awareness of themselves
    OSH Maturity matrix may be used pre/post coaching to assist in determining the effectiveness of the program for the individual and the organisation
    That the Coach be flexible in the delivery of the program so far as employees can pick a time (within reason) to fit their work commitments
    Coach should be a contractor to the organisation, not an employee as it can be perceived as just another imposed program, rather than a supportive program for the participants (policeman)
    Selection of the appropriate coach is one of the most critical success factors according to coachees
    A follow up coaching session in 2 – 3 months with coachees will set up an informal contract with coachees to continue to their safety leadership journey. EG. The coach may be available 1 day a week for a month to reconnect with coachees and also introduce new coachees to the concepts and coaching experience.
  • What else/if
    Maintaining momentum and sustainability of the coaching program – how do we do this? Need to maintain the rage with existing coachees and ensure new staff are not excluded
    Other delivery methods may need to be explored to deliver this program to remote employees, once the relationships with individuals have been formed (eg. videoconferencing, phone, etc)
    what do we need to consider if Paul is unable to undertake this coaching? Do we need to consider building a team or network of coaches to support our organisation with a similar for to our organisation
    If we do nothing
    We risk being unable to develop adequate leadership capability, especially with our demographic cliff that is rapidly approaching
    Opportunity to embed the learnings and their applications at the workplace, in a holistic sense, are lost
    Nothing changes
    We lose the opportunity and momentum to drive cultural change form the ground up
    Our Zero management priority will be much more difficult to realise
  • Pm#3818104v1 B Osh Leadership Coaching Pilot Swr Presentation To Rmt

    1. 1. OSH Leadership Coaching Pilot - SWR Final report and outcomes Lisa Barnes & Paul Fogarty
    2. 2. Why this pilot was important… • Effective safety leadership drives safety performance • Need capable supervisors to lead safety culture • Enhanced EQ & personal accountability at coalface • Leverage success of Safety Leadership Training • Identify & address workplace development issues
    3. 3. Purpose of the Pilot A Zero Harm initiative identified by OSH Branch • “To engage with supervisors and foremen and work with them on areas that are roadblocks and prevent them from being fully effective in their roles (both in safety and in general workplace relations).”
    4. 4. Project Team Working Group • Lisa Barnes – Pilot Coordinator, Client Rep, SWR • Paul Fogarty – Safety Coach, Growing in Focus Stakeholders • Cathy Grasso – Sponsor • Scott Moorhead – Client • SWR RMT – “Steering Committee” • Ron Kemp – Mentor, Safety Dimensions • Pilot funded under Zero Harm priority (OSH Branch)
    5. 5. The Process • Minimum of 4 sessions with each coachee • Program spanned 12 weeks – Coachees could attend as many sessions as they wanted • Each coaching session lasts from 50 – 90 minutes – Depending on need and circumstance – Based on Coachee’s needs/priorities
    6. 6. Measures of Success for Pilot Project • ≥ 4 meetings per participant with safety coach • ≥ 20 coachees engaged & participating • Self identified goals for each coachee – One issue must be safety related (OSH Leadership Maturity Matrix) – Could include other personal / workplace issue • Measurable success of pilot
    7. 7. OSH Leadership Maturity Matrix • 12 safety leadership aspects • 3 measures of maturity – Awakening – Involved – Embracing • Useful to assess areas for improvement – In both individuals & teams • Strongly supported • Will include in team leader PA’s (as defined in Regional Plan) Occupational Safety and Health Maturity Matrix SUPERVISOR/TEAM LEADER /PLANT MGR L E A D E R S H I P AWAKENING INVOLVED EMBRACING 1. Champions OSH in the Workplace Occasional discussions about team members’ ideas to progress safety. Occasionally gets into the field to supervise. OSH in some Performance Agreements. In meetings seeks& supports team member’s ideas to progress safety. Sometimes gets out to supervise safety. OSH in all Performance Agreements. Seeks& supports team members’ ideas to progress safety, in meetings and informally. Supervises safety. Regularly checks OSH in Safety Action Plan (“SAP”) is happening 2. Communication and Safe Behaviours Irregular team meetings. Infrequent reminders to consider safety first. Occasional reinforcement of need for safe job planning. Most Team meetings are scheduled. Encourages employees to consider their safety first. Talks with team about safe job planning. Some checks. Good structure in place for team meetings & minutes. Models expectation that safety must come first. Checks job planning and expects others to do same. 3. Champions Health and Well-being Neither opposes nor actively supports workplace health and well being programs. Is supportive (when approached) of others ideas to champion health in the workplace. Supports workplace health and well being programs and sometimes promotes these to team. Supports health champions. Always re-inducts employees to the workplace after leave. Actively encourages participation in workplace and personal health programs. Takes steps to minimise fatigue and stress in the workplace. E M P O W E R M E N T AWAKENING INVOLVED EMBRACING 4. Reward and Recognition On occasions recognises good safety performance. Rewards safe behaviour when prompted (when brought to supervisor’s attention). Recognises good safety performance at team meetings. Rewards safe behaviour without prompting. Beginning to manage poor safety performance. Recognises safety performance on most days. Actively seeks out and rewards examples of safe behaviour. Always manages poor safety performance. 5 . Empowers and Inspires OSH Reps Is aware of OSH Reps in the workplace and enables them to attend OSH Meetings. Occasional opportunities made for OSH Reps to participate in team meetings. Makes opportunities for OSH Reps to present at and feedback at team meetings on OSH issues. Empowers OSH Reps to be active in the workplace. Provides clear expectations of OSH Reps in the workplace. Supports development of OSH Reps through courses and coaching. Encourages commitment to “SAP”. 6. Empowers OSH Hazard Close-out Activities Follows up on outstanding hazards when requested to by manager. Sometimes discusses hazard close-out at team meetings. Hazard reporting and close-out a regular item on team meeting agendas. Team members have clear understanding of support for hazard close-out and avenues for funding. Actively seeks ways to control hazards in the interim and is creative in championing hazard close-out. Provides means for team members to close out simple hazards on their own. PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY AWAKENING INVOLVED EMBRACING 7. Safety Conversations “I Lead Conversations” Is beginning to have challenging safety conversations with team members. Is supportive of team members learning how to have safety conversations. Schedules time to supervise safety and have safety conversations with team members. Starting to encourage others to take time for safety conversations. Creates a workplace in which safety conversations occur daily. Tracks and shares the results of the team’s safety conversations with individuals and with team. 8. Action Completion Is aware of actions assigned from hazards, inspections, audits and investigations. Attends to these in an ad hoc way. Sometimes encourages action completion in the workplace. Makes time each week to attend to action completion and this is a regular agenda item for team meetings. Encourages others to complete actions assigned. Champions close-out of safety actions in the workplace. Rewards and recognises prompt action completion. Action completion recognised in “SAP”. 9. Training and Development Ad hoc register for OSH training and development. Most times attendance at training is supported in the workplace. OSH training is valued in the workplace and team members are strongly encouraged to attend. Non-attendance is followed up. Visible signs of training schedules in the workplace. All team members understand their OSH training priorities and these are written in a development plan. S A F E S Y S T E M S AWAKENING INVOLVED EMBRACING 10. Timely Response to OSH Issues Sometimes responds to safety issues in a timely manner. Team members report some instances where supervisor has resolved OSH issues well. Sometimes investigates incidents and near misses. Occasional feedback given to staff. OSH issues are prioritised and dealt with promptly. Team members report supervisor will always support OSH issues and usually close them out in a timely manner. Usually investigates incidents and near misses. Usually provides feedback. Supervisor actively champions all members dealing with OSH issues as a priority. Team members report being supported to put safety first. Incidents & near misses are investigated - lessons shared. Strong culture of feedback on safety issues. 11. Safe Job Planning and Contractor Management Safe Job Planning is discussed for big jobs. Some evidence exists of SJP documentation in the workplace. Supervisor sometimes personally checks on contractors OSH performance. Safe Job Planning time is scheduled weekly to discuss complex and high risk tasks. Job Planning records are checked weekly for high risk tasks. Contractors JSA are reviewed. Supervisor actively encourages and checks on Safe Job Planning, tracks progress and provides feedback and recognition. Start- up checks occur for most contractor works. 12. Injured Employees Usually accompanies injured employee to Dr and provides Drs letter with light duties list. Sometimes calls to check on injured worker and provides duties if requested to. Always accompanies injured worker to Dr with Drs letter and light duties list. Provides active support for employee in the workplace. Always supports the rehabilitation of injured workers in the workplace. Manages fitness for work, arranges support for and checks on fitness even after employee is back to full duties.
    8. 8. OSH Leadership Maturity Matrix as a tool • Leads to increased understanding of team leaders, teams and individuals on their OSH accountabilities – Clear and quantifiable expectations of performance • Identifies opportunities for personal and team growth • Can be coupled with PA / Development Plans to improve OSH culture and leadership
    9. 9. OSH Leadership Maturity Matrix as a tool Example of use: • Team leader asked her team to assess their maturity against the OSH LMM • Identified benefits: – Very positively received by team – Identified opportunities to improve team culture – Clarified accountabilities and expected behaviours – Helped open channels of communication – Cascades coaching approaches to others – Reinforces learnings of team leader
    10. 10. Evaluation of success The following slides will demonstrate success of this pilot • Participation rates – Number of participants & sessions – % participation per week • Personal feedback from participants – “Impact on me” – “Impact on team/workplace” – Improvements against OSH Maturity Matrix • Feedback informed coaching (ORS & SRS) • Safety Dimensions 2010 assessment tools – Participant Evaluation of self & coach – Managers evaluation of coachee
    11. 11. Number of Coachees attending Each Week
    12. 12. Number of Coachees attending Each Week • Target >20 coachees participating:  26 coachees participating • Target - >4 sessions per coachee  Average of 5.6 sessions per coachee  19 coachees ≥ 4 sessions  12 coachees ≥ 6 sessions
    13. 13. Number of Coachees attending each week • What hindered participation? – Work commitments, illness, planned leave, sufficient coaching received, not interested • What needs to be improved – Coaching not marketed effectively – Not enough lead time to sell benefits & allay fears – Mgt to be more familiar with coaching (advantages, experience and expected outcomes) – Mgt to market better – Mgt to support coachees to embed their learnings
    14. 14. Feedback informed coaching - description • ORS = how life impacts workplace • SRS = immediate feedback on coaching session • This enables the coach to use evidence based practice and to adjust their style for a more effective coachee outcome at the next session.
    15. 15. ORS = how life impacts workplace (Each line is an individual employee)
    16. 16. SRS = immediate feedback on coaching session (Each line is an individual employee)
    17. 17. “Impact on me” feedback – coachee quotes • To assist better with certain employees that require constant reminders on safety (JHA’s), also their own payroll claims. Being able to coach/train these employees, like on job training • Given an awareness of how/why issues evolved. Now have tools to address issues. An insight into others behaviour. • Greater awareness of my role, formalising issues, structured meetings, forward planning. • Better understanding of how to avoid conflicts & resolve issues • To think before addressing the team and the way they feel. Not raising my voice and trying to have a win-win. Responding more to behaviour and listening • Given me extra ideas when coaching my team • Make myself think more about what others requirements are, and will be • Very positive. Eye opener about OSH Capabilities Matrix. Made me reflect more on OSH (and other) issues in our team and what sits behind the behaviour observed. Gave me tools and courage to, in a constructive way, confront team members on a range of issues that needed to be resolved. Made me focus on my supervising skills/tasks and not only on day to day activities. • I found the coaching sessions were good value for me and started me thinking about how I lead. To communicate better, listen, and structure my sentences better. To plan better which helps with work scheduling and intermediate work • Assessment of my wellbeing. Life-work relationships. Identified impacts. Reassessment of my life priorities. Ideas to embrace change. • Focus and understanding • Beneficial guidance on my communication techniques as to safety leadership. Made me more aware of my role as a safe work leader for my team. Assisted me in reaching for personal goals • The sessions make me think about what I need to improve and how to do it. I think it has been very positive
    18. 18. “Impact on team/workplace” – coachee quotes • Increased understanding, improved approach to team members, able to pinpoint issues and discuss them without turning a spark into a volcano • More structured approach when approaching & coaching/mentoring staff on issues. Clearer delegation • Be able to listen & give appropriate advice. Be able to take feedback appropriately and give direction • To bring to mind what I already know and integrate it into the workplace • My team has had ideas presented to them via different angles • To be able to transfer knowledge to others and understand the methods used • Positive. Through a number of discussions with a team member, helped him to take control of his own area (sub-team empowered). Through ILEAD discussions, got to know team member better and understand better what is causing problems – need more work on this to improve performance, relationship, etc. Team is now aware of our OSH responsibilities. Team is now committed to improve our OSH performance and at our next meeting we are going to explore the how, when, what of this • To structure a meeting better so that there are outcomes others will take ownership on and follow through. We are communicating better and are more organised. • Reassessment of my work commitments. Reinforced importance of all supervisors/team leaders being on the same page – expected standards, behaviours, etc. Use of Safety Matrix in discussions to involve/embrace personal responsibilities – development of operational plan with forepersons. Increased focus. • Improved clarity. More reflection on what is communicated. • Too early to tell as yet but have noticed a more open attitude in conversations in relation to work procedures plus a notable change and acceptance of my role as team leader while also being a strong team member. • Early days yet but I am starting to implement some ideas and strategies and can see that we already discuss and think of safety more often
    19. 19. OSH Maturity Matrix – improvements implemented L E A D E R S H I P Your order of priority (H,M,L) What did you do to improve this leadership accountability and what improvements have you seen or experienced 1. Champions OSH in the Workplace H=5 M=2 19 • Involve team in assessment (where do we fit in the Matrix) • Ensure all JSA/JHA forms filled out for all routine/non-routine work • I took a more proactive, positive approach and noticed it rubbed off on the team 2. Communication and Safe Behaviours H=7 L=1 22 • JSA & work planning done an all tasks to review normal actions • Safety is first on the agenda at weekly toolbox meetings • Safety is a larger component of toolbox meetings. We talk about it more. • To make sure this team understand that they are accountable for each other and to make sure they consider all safety aspects of their work environment 3. Champions Health and Well-being H=3 M=2 L=3 16 • Completed 2 re-inductions • We follow Corporate requirements and communicate as a team if we face fatigue issues E M P O W E R M E N T Your order of priority (H,M,L) What did you do to improve this leadership accountability and what improvements have you seen or experienced 4. Reward and Recognition H=5 M=1 L=1 18 • We have discussed this at a team meeting and we feel that it is best to verbally acknowledge good outcomes • Team has regular recognition of any new initiatives • We reward and recognise safe behaviour 5 . Empowers and Inspires OSH Reps H=3 M=3 L=1 16 • Team OSH Representative to liaise and attend another teams meeting • OSH rep has time at our toolbox meetings to provide feedback on issues • Promoted issue of team OSH representative to chair safety section of fortnight team meetings • Identified a need for greater contact and communication with OSH Rep 6. Empowers OSH Hazard Close-out Activities H=5 M=2 19 • Hazard closed is not a big issue, but lack of reporting hazards is • All “old” hazards have recently been reviewed and closed out with the help of the OSH team • We raised 58 hazards as a team last year. All are closed out or have an action in place.
    20. 20. OSH Maturity Matrix – improvements implemented cont… PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY Your order of priority (H,M,L) What did you do to improve this leadership accountability and what improvements have you seen or experienced 7. Safety Conversations “I Lead Conversations” H=4 M=2 L=1 17 • Discuss safety at every toolbox meeting. We now all take an active role in our responsibilities 8. Action Completion H=7 21 • Employees now doing end of day logging off their PDA’s • Any actions are closed out with the team contributions ASAP • This is often financially driven and much is dealt with outside of the team 9. Training and Development H=6 M=1 L=1 21 • Give the responsibility for assessing work to be done to others, and watch them develop their own work ethic (delegation) • OSH training is mandatory • I am working on these areas and expect to improve S A F E S Y S T E M S Your order of priority (H,M,L) What did you do to improve this leadership accountability and what improvements have you seen or experienced 10. Timely Response to OSH Issues H=4 M=3 18 • Incidents are logged and debriefs follow 11. Safe Job Planning and Contractor Management H=6 M=1 20 • Requested JSA’s from contractors - now be our standard approach • All major clients have JSA in their file, reviewed before work commences. • All contractors are WC inducted & site inducted. CTW permits issued for all work 12. Injured Employees H=4 M=1 L=2 16 • As per WC policy, and help where possible if not a WC issue.
    21. 21. Final Coaching Evaluation
    22. 22. Outcomes / observations • Participants highly complementary of coaching pilot and would recommend to others • Benefits - helped coachees: – Focus on what they can influence – Increase their understanding of accountabilities – Improve their perception/attitude to change – Celebrate their strengths • Improved approach/behaviours noticed by staff • Promotes sharing of explicit and tacit knowledge • Coaching seen as a resource for learning & development • Coaching a team leader, their supervisor and their line manager has greater benefits for the whole team
    23. 23. Recommendations for the future • Format of coaching: – 12 week program – allow for contingencies – Follow up coaching session after ~3 & 6 months - Eg once per week for a month - Also opportunities to bring along new supervisors at that time • Clarify linkages with existing plans & programs – Existing culture & leadership dvpt initiatives & training – Role of coaching vs management accountabilities vs EAP - for managing stress and welfare of our employees – Raise awareness with management & staff • Coach “fit” essential to success according to the coachees – Professional and experienced coach – Contractor to the WC, not employee – Flexibility to fit changing work priorities of our staff
    24. 24. Recommendations for the future (cont…) • Management commitment required – Understand coaching process, benefits and expected outcomes – Build strong awareness and support with coachees prior – Coach participants during and after, including prioritisation of work to facilitate their involvement • Establish a key contact person – Facilitate/coordinate coaching program – Weekly meetings (approx) with coach to resolve issues • Coachee prerequisites/preparation – LSI to understand self – Safety Leadership Program to understand tools and theories – Assess OSH LMM of self near beginning of the coaching session and assess growth at future session (+6 months)
    25. 25. What else do we need to consider? • How do we build capability of new supervisors quickly? – We often set them up to fail. Supervisor induction? • Best method of providing coaching for each area – Intensity, time, location, format • 1 or 2 coaches contracted to us or network or both? • Demographic cliff – Preparing people for retirement, sharing their knowledge • Coaching  Culture change  Zero Harm
    26. 26. Over to you… • The success of the coaching program rests with your leadership and support

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