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StrengthsFinder 2.0 Report
© 2000, 2006-2012 GALLUP, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Strengths Insight and Action-Planning Guide
SURVEY COMPLETION DATE: 09-16-2012
Paul Bourn
Your Top 5 Themes
Discipline
Competition
Analytical
Focus
Significance
What's in This Guide?
Section I: Awareness
A brief Shared Theme Description for each of your top five themes
Your Personalized Strengths Insights, which describe what makes you stand out from others
with the same theme in their top five
Questions for you to answer to increase your awareness of your talents
Section II: Application
10 Ideas for Action for each of your top five themes
Questions for you to answer to help you apply your talents
Section III: Achievement
Examples of what each of your top five themes "sounds like" -- real quotes from people who
also have the theme in their top five
Steps for you to take to help you leverage your talents for achievement
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
1
Section I: Awareness
Discipline
Shared Theme Description
People who are especially talented in the Discipline theme enjoy routine and structure. Their world is
best described by the order they create.
Your Personalized Strengths Insights
What makes you stand out?
By nature, you remove clutter from your life. You find satisfaction in making things gleam. Great
pleasure is the end result of your efforts. Sprucing up things fills you with joy. Chances are good that
you naturally set up structures within which to work, study, travel, or entertain. Regarding tedious but
essential chores, you are someone who repeatedly follows the same course of action. You tend to
recall major and minor details, appointments, itineraries, or deadlines. You create ways to be efficient.
Why? Doing so frees your mind to deal with one-of-a-kind problems and unexpected opportunities.
Driven by your talents, you enjoy assignments that allow you to create streamlined systems for
handling repetitious activities. You identify the essential details and deadlines involved. Then you set
up programs to help people operate in a speedy and efficient manner. It’s very likely that you regularly
create structured processes to reach goals and handle everyday chores. Undoubtedly, these routines
free you to concentrate all of your mental and physical energy on immediate challenges,
opportunities, events, problems, assignments, joys, or beauty. Because of your strengths, you prefer
assignments and projects that demand strict adherence to very high standards. You trust processes
that yield perfect outcomes time after time. You like designing structured and clear directions for
tasks. The level of detail you put into your work or studies likely mirrors how organized and meticulous
you are.
Questions
1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to
you?
2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you?
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
2
Competition
Shared Theme Description
People who are especially talented in the Competition theme measure their progress against the
performance of others. They strive to win first place and revel in contests.
Your Personalized Strengths Insights
What makes you stand out?
Instinctively, you work hard to be the best or “number one.” When your performance is compared to
everyone else’s, you aim to win. If you were an Olympic athlete, being presented with a silver or
bronze medal would be a huge disappointment. Only the gold medal in your chosen event would
make you happy. Driven by your talents, you notice that multiple solutions to nagging problems
automatically pop into your mind. You usually study each option from many different angles. After
carefully evaluating the entire situation, you likely choose the alternative that makes the most sense.
Why? You habitually aim to outscore or outperform most of your rivals most of the time. Because of
your strengths, you really push yourself to be the best. You typically gain an advantage whenever you
can dictate how the game will be played or how a project will be organized. You characteristically
prefer to be the person in charge of your life. Chances are good that you are quite clever about many
things. You typically outmaneuver or outthink most individuals. Why? You probably are a lot more
persistent, unyielding, and energetic than they are. By nature, you prefer to identify the most
appropriate course of action or solution before you do anything. You are determined to do things
correctly, ethically, and right. Why? You probably aim to make important contributions, influence key
people, or rise to high-level positions. Settling for the status quo is not an option for you. You aspire to
much more in life.
Questions
1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to
you?
2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you?
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
3
Analytical
Shared Theme Description
People who are especially talented in the Analytical theme search for reasons and causes. They have
the ability to think about all the factors that might affect a situation.
Your Personalized Strengths Insights
What makes you stand out?
Instinctively, you are unsentimental and not often swayed by emotional arguments or passionate
pleas. People are likely to describe you as quite realistic and practical. By nature, you carefully think
through things prior to making important decisions or taking action. Usually you know exactly where
you are headed and how you plan to get there. You need to know why a goal is important. You
seldom act in haste. It’s very likely that you critically examine the essential elements of the current
condition. You toil tirelessly to identify the basic parts of various plans, problems, opportunities,
processes, or ideas. Chances are good that you enjoy finding recurring sequences in numerical data.
Numbers tell you stories about emerging trends, potential problems, profit and loss forecasts, or
information gaps. People probably marvel at your ability to process the numbers and decide what they
mean. Because of your strengths, you try to collect pertinent and precise data. You may refuse to stop
searching until you find accurate facts. You might collect information that is relevant to your life, your
work, or your studies.
Questions
1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to
you?
2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you?
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
4
Focus
Shared Theme Description
People who are especially talented in the Focus theme can take a direction, follow through, and make
the corrections necessary to stay on track. They prioritize, then act.
Your Personalized Strengths Insights
What makes you stand out?
Chances are good that you might do more than simply yearn to live a balanced life. Sometimes you
actually map out what you will do in the coming weeks, months, or years to stabilize your personal
and professional priorities. Perhaps you have the ability to adhere to this plan, especially when you
can invest time in meaningful activities and relationships. By nature, you work diligently to govern all
kinds of situations, decisions, or plans. You ordinarily refuse to let anyone take charge of any aspect
of your life. Driven by your talents, you pinpoint what you need to accomplish. Then you give it your
undivided attention. Few people can match your natural powers of concentration. It’s very likely that
you earnestly apply yourself to seeing things as they really are. You bring a practical, matter-of-fact,
and unsentimental outlook to various discussions, projects, or planning meetings. Instinctively, you
are typically exasperated by people who cannot set a clear direction for themselves. You can become
annoyed by their inability to ignore distractions that prevent them from reaching their goals, meeting
their deadlines, or following their plans.
Questions
1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to
you?
2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you?
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
5
Significance
Shared Theme Description
People who are especially talented in the Significance theme want to be very important in the eyes of
others. They are independent and want to be recognized.
Your Personalized Strengths Insights
What makes you stand out?
Chances are good that you occasionally encourage or prod people to excel. Perhaps they heed your
message when they hold you in high esteem. By nature, you attract people by noticing their
accomplishments. You gain much satisfaction from being liked. Your sense of importance is
enhanced when many people say you are their friend. Because of your strengths, you can prepare
people to encounter danger, bear pain, or withstand adversity. You fortify others so they grow
stronger. Instinctively, you now and then pressure individuals to reach their goals. After they meet
these challenges, you might ask them to examine everything they did right. To some degree, you see
yourself as the catalyst — that is, the stimulus — for their success. Driven by your talents, you devote
yourself to understanding cause-and-effect relationships. You derive satisfaction from sharing what
you know. You have a reputation for finding the right answers. This motivates you to examine why
things function the way they do. You are equally interested in discovering why other things fail to
operate properly.
Questions
1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to
you?
2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you?
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
6
Questions
1. How does this information help you better understand your unique talents?
2. How can you use this understanding to add value to your role?
3. How can you apply this knowledge to add value to your team, workgroup, department, or
division?
4. How will this understanding help you add value to your organization?
5. What will you do differently tomorrow as a result of this report?
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
7
Section II: Application
Discipline
Ideas for Action:
Don’t hesitate to check as often as necessary to ensure that things are right. You feel an
urge to do it anyway, and soon others will come to expect it from you.
Accept that mistakes might depress you. Precision is a core part of who you are; however,
you must find ways to move through these moments of annoyance to prevent becoming
discouraged.
Recognize that others may not be as disciplined as you are. More than likely, their clumsy
process will frustrate you, so try to look beyond it, and focus on their results, not on their
process.
Exactitude is your forté; you enjoy poring over details. Seek opportunities to peruse
contracts, important communications, or financial documents for errors. You can save
yourself and others from making costly mistakes and looking foolish.
Increasing efficiency is one of your hallmarks. You are a perfectionist at heart. Discover
situations in which time or money is being wasted because of inefficiency, and create
systems or procedures to improve efficiency.
You not only create order, you probably also crave it in the form of a well-organized
space. To completely free your Discipline talents, invest in furniture and organization
systems that enable you to have “a place for everything and everything in its place.”
Timelines motivate you. When you have a task to complete, you like to know the deadline
so you can plan your schedule accordingly. Apply your Discipline talents by outlining the
step-by-step plan you will use. Others will appreciate your cues because they will help
keep everyone “on task.”
Others may confuse your Discipline talents with rigidity. Help them understand that your
discipline helps you pack more effectiveness into a day — often because you prioritize
your time. When working with others who are not as disciplined, ask them to clarify
deadlines so you can adjust your workload to accommodate their requests.
Seek out roles and responsibilities that have structure.
Create routines that require you to systematically follow through. Over time, people will
come to appreciate this kind of predictability.
Questions
1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to
take.
2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will
take in the next 30 days.
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
8
Competition
Ideas for Action:
Select work environments in which you can measure your achievements. You might not
be able to discover how good you can be without competing.
List the performance scores that help you know where you stand every day. What scores
should you pay attention to?
Identify a high-achieving person against whom you can measure your own achievement. If
there is more than one, list all the people with whom you currently compete. Without
measurement, how will you know if you won?
Try to turn ordinary tasks into competitive games. You will get more done this way.
When you win, take the time to investigate why you won. You can learn a great deal more
from a victory than from a loss.
Let people know that being competitive does not equate with putting others down. Explain
that you derive satisfaction from pitting yourself against good, strong competitors and
winning.
Develop a “balanced metric” — a measurement system that will monitor all aspects of
your performance. Even if you are competing against your own previous numbers, this
measurement will help you give proper attention to all aspects of your performance.
When competing with others, create development opportunities by choosing to compare
yourself to someone who is slightly above your current level of expertise. Your competition
will push you to refine your skills and knowledge to exceed those of that person. Look one
or two levels above you for a role model who will push you to improve.
Take the time to celebrate your wins. In your world, there is no victory without celebration.
Design some mental strategies that can help you deal with a loss. Armed with these
strategies, you will be able to move on to the next challenge much more quickly.
Questions
1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to
take.
2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will
take in the next 30 days.
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
9
Analytical
Ideas for Action:
Choose work in which you are paid to analyze data, find patterns, or organize ideas. For
example, you might excel in marketing, financial, or medical research or in database
management, editing, or risk management.
Whatever your role, identify credible sources on which you can rely. You are at your best
when you have well-researched sources of information and numbers to support your logic.
For example, determine the most helpful books, websites, or publications that can serve
as references.
Your mind is constantly working and producing insightful analysis. Are others aware of
that? Find the best way of expressing your thoughts: writing, one-on-one conversations,
group discussions, perhaps lectures or presentations. Put value to your thoughts by
communicating them.
Make sure that your accumulation and analysis of information always leads to its
application and implementation. If you don’t do this naturally, find a partner who pushes
you from theory to practice, from thinking to doing. This person will help ensure that your
analysis doesn’t turn into paralysis.
Take an academic course that will expand your Analytical talents. Specifically, study
people whose logic you admire.
Volunteer your Analytical talents. You can be particularly helpful to those who are
struggling to organize large quantities of data or having a hard time bringing structure to
their ideas.
Partner with someone with strong Activator talents. This person’s impatience will move
you more quickly through the analytical phase into the action phase.
You may remain skeptical until you see solid proof. Your skepticism ensures validity, but
others may take it personally. Help others realize that your skepticism is primarily about
data, not people.
Look for patterns in data. See if you can discern a motif, precedent, or relationship in
scores or numbers. By connecting the dots in the data and inferring a causal link, you may
be able to help others see these patterns.
Help others understand that your analytical approach will often require data and other
information to logically back up new ideas that they might suggest.
Questions
1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to
take.
2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will
take in the next 30 days.
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
10
Focus
Ideas for Action:
When you set goals, discipline yourself to include timelines and measurements. These will
provide regular proof that you are indeed making progress.
Seek roles in which you can function independently. With your dominant Focus talents,
you will be able to stay on track with little supervision.
Your greatest worth as a team member might be helping others set goals. At the end of
meetings, take responsibility for summarizing what was decided, for defining when these
decisions will be acted on, and for setting a date when the group will reconvene.
Others will think, act, and talk less efficiently than you do. Pay attention. Sometimes their
“detours” will lead to discoveries and delights.
Stretch your goal setting beyond work. If you find yourself becoming too focused on work
goals, set goals for your personal life. They will give weight to your personal priorities and
thereby help create balance in your life.
Hours can disappear when you are intent on a task; you lose track of time. Make sure that
all of your objectives are met and all of your priorities are followed by scheduling your
efforts and sticking to that schedule.
You function best when you can concentrate on a few well-defined initiatives and
demands. Give yourself permission to reject projects or tasks that do not align with your
overall mission. This will help you concentrate your efforts on your most important
priorities — and will help others appreciate your need for focus.
Take the time to write down your aspirations, and refer to them often. You will feel more in
control of your life.
At work, be sure to tell your manager your mid-term and short-term goals. This might well
give your manager the confidence to give you the room you need.
Make sure that the focus points you set for yourself take into consideration both quantity
and quality. The integrity of your objectives will ensure that the application of your Focus
talents leads to solid and long-lasting success.
Questions
1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to
take.
2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will
take in the next 30 days.
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
11
Significance
Ideas for Action:
Choose jobs or positions in which you can determine your own tasks and actions. You will
enjoy the exposure that comes with independence.
Your reputation is important to you, so decide what it should be and tend to it in the
smallest detail. For example, identify and earn a designation that will add to your
credibility, write an article that will give you visibility, or volunteer to speak in front of a
group who will admire your achievements.
Share your dreams and goals with your family or closest friends and colleagues. Their
expectations will keep you reaching.
Stay focused on performance. Your Significance talents will drive you to claim outstanding
goals. Your performance had better match those goals, or others might label you as a big
talker.
You will perform best when your performance is visible. Look for opportunities that put you
on center stage. Stay away from roles that hide you behind the scenes.
Leading crucial teams or significant projects brings out your best. Your greatest motivation
may come when the stakes are at their highest. Let others know that when the game is on
the line, you want the ball.
Make a list of the goals, achievements, and qualifications you crave, and post them where
you will see them every day. Use this list to inspire yourself.
Identify your best moment of recognition or praise. What was it for? Who gave it to you?
Who was the audience? What do you have to do to recreate that moment?
Unless you also possess dominant Self-Assurance talents, accept that you might fear
failure. Don’t let this fear prevent you from staking claims to excellence. Instead, use it to
focus on ensuring that your performance matches your claims.
You might have a natural awareness of what other people think of you. You may have a
specific audience that you want to like you, and you will do whatever it takes to win their
approval and applause. Be aware that while reliance on the approval of others could be
problematic, there is nothing wrong with wanting to be liked or admired by the key people
in your life.
Questions
1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to
take.
2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will
take in the next 30 days.
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
12
Section III: Achievement
Look for signs of achievement as you read these real quotes from people who share your top five
themes.
Discipline sounds like this:
Les T., hospitality manager: “The turning point in my career was attending one of those time-
management courses some years back. I was always disciplined, but the power grew when I learned
how to use that discipline in an organized process every day. This little Palm Pilot means that I call my
mom every Sunday rather than letting months go by without calling. It means I take my wife out for
dinner every week without her asking. It means that my employees know that if I say I need to see
something on Monday, I will be calling on Monday if I haven’t seen it. This Palm Pilot is so much a
part of my life that I have lengthened all of my pants pockets so that it fits right there on my hip.”
Troy T., sales executive: “My filing system may not look that pretty, but it is very efficient. I write
everything by hand because I know that no customer is going to see these files, so why waste time
making them look pretty? My whole life as a salesperson is based on deadlines and follow-up. In my
system, I keep track of everything so that I take responsibility not only for my deadlines and follow-up
but for all of my customers’ and colleagues’ as well. If they haven’t gotten back to me by the time they
promised, they’re going to receive an e-mail from me. In fact, I heard from one the other day who said,
‘I may as well get back to you because I know you’re going to call me if you haven’t heard from me.’”
Diedre S., office manager: “I hate wasting time, so I make lists — long lists that keep me on track.
Today my list has ninety items on it, and I will get through ninety-five percent of them. And that’s
discipline because I don’t let anybody waste my time. I am not rude, but I can let you know in a very
tactful, humorous way that your time is up.”
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
13
Competition sounds like this:
Mark L., sales executive: “I’ve played sports my entire life, and I don’t just play to have fun — let me
put it that way. I like to engage in sports I am going to win and not ones I am going to lose, because if
I lose, I am outwardly gracious but inwardly infuriated.”
Harry D., general manager: “I'm not a big sailor, but I love the America’s Cup. Both boats are
supposed to be exactly the same, and both crews have top-notch athletes. But you always get a
winner. One of them had some secret up their sleeves that tipped the balance and enabled them to
win more often than lose. And that’s what I am looking for — that secret, that tiny edge.”
Sumner Redstone, chairman of Viacom (now known as CBS Corporation), on his efforts to acquire
that company: “I relished every minute of it because Viacom was a company worth fighting for and I
enjoyed a contest. If you get involved in a major competitive struggle, and the stress that inevitably
comes with it, you’d better derive some real sense of satisfaction and enjoyment from the ultimate
victory. Wrestling control of a company like Viacom was warfare. I believe the real lesson it taught me
was that it is not about money, it’s about the will to win.”
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
14
Analytical sounds like this:
Jose G., school system administrator: “I have an innate ability to see structures, formats, and patterns
before they exist. For instance, when people are talking about writing a grant proposal, while I’m
listening to them, my brain instinctively processes the type of grants that are available and how the
discussion fits into the eligibility, right down to the format of how the information can fit on the grant
form in a clear and convincing way.”
Jack T., human resources executive: “If I make a claim, I need to know that I can back it up with facts
and logical thinking. For example, if someone says that our company is not paying as much as other
companies, I always ask, ‘Why do you say that?’ If they say, ‘Well, I saw an ad in the paper that offers
graduates in mechanical engineering five grand more than we are paying,’ I'll reply by asking, ‘But
where are these graduates going to work? Is their salary based on geography? What types of
companies are they going for? Are they manufacturing companies like ours? And how many people
are in their sample? Is it three people, and one of them got a really good deal, thus driving the overall
average up?’ There are many questions I need to ask to ensure that their claim is indeed a fact and
not based on one misleading data point.”
Leslie J., school principal: “Many times, there are inconsistencies in the performance of the same
group of students from one year to the next. It’s the same group of kids, but their scores are different
year to year. How can this be? Which building are the kids in? How many of the kids have been
enrolled for a full academic year? Which teachers were they assigned to, and what teaching styles
were used by those teachers? I just love asking questions like these to understand what is truly
happening.”
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
15
Focus sounds like this:
Nick H., computer executive: “It is very important to me to be efficient. I’m the sort of guy who plays a
round of golf in two and a half hours. When I was at Electronic Data Systems, I worked out a set list of
questions so that I could conduct a review of each division in 15 minutes. The founder, Ross Perot,
called me ‘The Dentist’ because I would schedule a whole day of these in-and-out, fifteen-minute
meetings.”
Brad F., sales executive: “I am always sorting priorities, trying to figure out the most efficient route
toward the goal so that there is very little dead time, very little wasted motion. For example, I will get
multiple calls from customers who need me to call the service department for them, and rather than
taking each one of these calls as they come and interrupting the priorities of the day, I group them
together into one call at the end of the day and get it done.”
Mike L., administrator: “People are amazed how I put things into perspective and stay on track. When
people around the district are stuck on issues and caught on contrived barriers, I am able to pole-vault
over them, reestablish the focus, and keep things moving.”
Doriane L., homemaker: “I am just the kind of person who likes to get to the point — in conversations,
at work, and even when I am shopping with my husband. He likes to try on lots of things and has a
good time doing it, whereas I try one thing on, and if I like it and it is not horribly priced, I buy it. I’m a
surgical shopper.”
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
16
Significance sounds like this:
Mary P., healthcare executive: “Women are told almost from day one, ‘Don’t be too proud. Don’t stand
tall.’ That kind of thing. But I’ve learned that it’s okay to have power, it’s okay to have pride, and it’s
okay to have a big ego — and also that I need to manage it and drive it in the right directions.”
Kathie J., partner in a law firm: “Ever since I can remember, I have had the feeling that I was special,
that I could take charge and make things happen. Back in the ‘60s, I was the first woman partner in
my firm, and I can still recall walking into boardroom after boardroom and being the only woman. It’s
strange, thinking back. It was tough, but I actually think I enjoyed the pressure of standing out. I
enjoyed being the ‘woman’ partner. Why? Because I knew that I would be very hard to forget. I knew
everyone would notice me and pay attention to me.”
John L., physician: “All through my life, I felt that I was onstage. I am always aware of an audience. If I
am sitting with a patient, I want the patient to see me as the best doctor he or she has ever had. If I
am teaching medical students, I want to stand out as the best medical educator they have ever had. I
want to win the Educator of the Year award. My boss is a big audience for me. Disappointing her
would kill me. It’s scary to think that part of my self-esteem is in other people’s hands, but then again,
it keeps me on my toes.”
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
17
Questions
1. Talk to friends or coworkers to hear how they have used their talents to achieve.
2. How will you use your talents to achieve?
369433853 (Paul Bourn)
© 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved.
18

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Strength Finder Report (Gallup) 2012 - Paul Daniel Bourn

  • 1. StrengthsFinder 2.0 Report © 2000, 2006-2012 GALLUP, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
  • 2. Strengths Insight and Action-Planning Guide SURVEY COMPLETION DATE: 09-16-2012 Paul Bourn Your Top 5 Themes Discipline Competition Analytical Focus Significance What's in This Guide? Section I: Awareness A brief Shared Theme Description for each of your top five themes Your Personalized Strengths Insights, which describe what makes you stand out from others with the same theme in their top five Questions for you to answer to increase your awareness of your talents Section II: Application 10 Ideas for Action for each of your top five themes Questions for you to answer to help you apply your talents Section III: Achievement Examples of what each of your top five themes "sounds like" -- real quotes from people who also have the theme in their top five Steps for you to take to help you leverage your talents for achievement 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 1
  • 3. Section I: Awareness Discipline Shared Theme Description People who are especially talented in the Discipline theme enjoy routine and structure. Their world is best described by the order they create. Your Personalized Strengths Insights What makes you stand out? By nature, you remove clutter from your life. You find satisfaction in making things gleam. Great pleasure is the end result of your efforts. Sprucing up things fills you with joy. Chances are good that you naturally set up structures within which to work, study, travel, or entertain. Regarding tedious but essential chores, you are someone who repeatedly follows the same course of action. You tend to recall major and minor details, appointments, itineraries, or deadlines. You create ways to be efficient. Why? Doing so frees your mind to deal with one-of-a-kind problems and unexpected opportunities. Driven by your talents, you enjoy assignments that allow you to create streamlined systems for handling repetitious activities. You identify the essential details and deadlines involved. Then you set up programs to help people operate in a speedy and efficient manner. It’s very likely that you regularly create structured processes to reach goals and handle everyday chores. Undoubtedly, these routines free you to concentrate all of your mental and physical energy on immediate challenges, opportunities, events, problems, assignments, joys, or beauty. Because of your strengths, you prefer assignments and projects that demand strict adherence to very high standards. You trust processes that yield perfect outcomes time after time. You like designing structured and clear directions for tasks. The level of detail you put into your work or studies likely mirrors how organized and meticulous you are. Questions 1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to you? 2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you? 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 2
  • 4. Competition Shared Theme Description People who are especially talented in the Competition theme measure their progress against the performance of others. They strive to win first place and revel in contests. Your Personalized Strengths Insights What makes you stand out? Instinctively, you work hard to be the best or “number one.” When your performance is compared to everyone else’s, you aim to win. If you were an Olympic athlete, being presented with a silver or bronze medal would be a huge disappointment. Only the gold medal in your chosen event would make you happy. Driven by your talents, you notice that multiple solutions to nagging problems automatically pop into your mind. You usually study each option from many different angles. After carefully evaluating the entire situation, you likely choose the alternative that makes the most sense. Why? You habitually aim to outscore or outperform most of your rivals most of the time. Because of your strengths, you really push yourself to be the best. You typically gain an advantage whenever you can dictate how the game will be played or how a project will be organized. You characteristically prefer to be the person in charge of your life. Chances are good that you are quite clever about many things. You typically outmaneuver or outthink most individuals. Why? You probably are a lot more persistent, unyielding, and energetic than they are. By nature, you prefer to identify the most appropriate course of action or solution before you do anything. You are determined to do things correctly, ethically, and right. Why? You probably aim to make important contributions, influence key people, or rise to high-level positions. Settling for the status quo is not an option for you. You aspire to much more in life. Questions 1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to you? 2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you? 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 3
  • 5. Analytical Shared Theme Description People who are especially talented in the Analytical theme search for reasons and causes. They have the ability to think about all the factors that might affect a situation. Your Personalized Strengths Insights What makes you stand out? Instinctively, you are unsentimental and not often swayed by emotional arguments or passionate pleas. People are likely to describe you as quite realistic and practical. By nature, you carefully think through things prior to making important decisions or taking action. Usually you know exactly where you are headed and how you plan to get there. You need to know why a goal is important. You seldom act in haste. It’s very likely that you critically examine the essential elements of the current condition. You toil tirelessly to identify the basic parts of various plans, problems, opportunities, processes, or ideas. Chances are good that you enjoy finding recurring sequences in numerical data. Numbers tell you stories about emerging trends, potential problems, profit and loss forecasts, or information gaps. People probably marvel at your ability to process the numbers and decide what they mean. Because of your strengths, you try to collect pertinent and precise data. You may refuse to stop searching until you find accurate facts. You might collect information that is relevant to your life, your work, or your studies. Questions 1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to you? 2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you? 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 4
  • 6. Focus Shared Theme Description People who are especially talented in the Focus theme can take a direction, follow through, and make the corrections necessary to stay on track. They prioritize, then act. Your Personalized Strengths Insights What makes you stand out? Chances are good that you might do more than simply yearn to live a balanced life. Sometimes you actually map out what you will do in the coming weeks, months, or years to stabilize your personal and professional priorities. Perhaps you have the ability to adhere to this plan, especially when you can invest time in meaningful activities and relationships. By nature, you work diligently to govern all kinds of situations, decisions, or plans. You ordinarily refuse to let anyone take charge of any aspect of your life. Driven by your talents, you pinpoint what you need to accomplish. Then you give it your undivided attention. Few people can match your natural powers of concentration. It’s very likely that you earnestly apply yourself to seeing things as they really are. You bring a practical, matter-of-fact, and unsentimental outlook to various discussions, projects, or planning meetings. Instinctively, you are typically exasperated by people who cannot set a clear direction for themselves. You can become annoyed by their inability to ignore distractions that prevent them from reaching their goals, meeting their deadlines, or following their plans. Questions 1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to you? 2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you? 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 5
  • 7. Significance Shared Theme Description People who are especially talented in the Significance theme want to be very important in the eyes of others. They are independent and want to be recognized. Your Personalized Strengths Insights What makes you stand out? Chances are good that you occasionally encourage or prod people to excel. Perhaps they heed your message when they hold you in high esteem. By nature, you attract people by noticing their accomplishments. You gain much satisfaction from being liked. Your sense of importance is enhanced when many people say you are their friend. Because of your strengths, you can prepare people to encounter danger, bear pain, or withstand adversity. You fortify others so they grow stronger. Instinctively, you now and then pressure individuals to reach their goals. After they meet these challenges, you might ask them to examine everything they did right. To some degree, you see yourself as the catalyst — that is, the stimulus — for their success. Driven by your talents, you devote yourself to understanding cause-and-effect relationships. You derive satisfaction from sharing what you know. You have a reputation for finding the right answers. This motivates you to examine why things function the way they do. You are equally interested in discovering why other things fail to operate properly. Questions 1. As you read your personalized strengths insights, what words, phrases, or lines stand out to you? 2. Out of all the talents in this insight, what would you like for others to see most in you? 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 6
  • 8. Questions 1. How does this information help you better understand your unique talents? 2. How can you use this understanding to add value to your role? 3. How can you apply this knowledge to add value to your team, workgroup, department, or division? 4. How will this understanding help you add value to your organization? 5. What will you do differently tomorrow as a result of this report? 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 7
  • 9. Section II: Application Discipline Ideas for Action: Don’t hesitate to check as often as necessary to ensure that things are right. You feel an urge to do it anyway, and soon others will come to expect it from you. Accept that mistakes might depress you. Precision is a core part of who you are; however, you must find ways to move through these moments of annoyance to prevent becoming discouraged. Recognize that others may not be as disciplined as you are. More than likely, their clumsy process will frustrate you, so try to look beyond it, and focus on their results, not on their process. Exactitude is your forté; you enjoy poring over details. Seek opportunities to peruse contracts, important communications, or financial documents for errors. You can save yourself and others from making costly mistakes and looking foolish. Increasing efficiency is one of your hallmarks. You are a perfectionist at heart. Discover situations in which time or money is being wasted because of inefficiency, and create systems or procedures to improve efficiency. You not only create order, you probably also crave it in the form of a well-organized space. To completely free your Discipline talents, invest in furniture and organization systems that enable you to have “a place for everything and everything in its place.” Timelines motivate you. When you have a task to complete, you like to know the deadline so you can plan your schedule accordingly. Apply your Discipline talents by outlining the step-by-step plan you will use. Others will appreciate your cues because they will help keep everyone “on task.” Others may confuse your Discipline talents with rigidity. Help them understand that your discipline helps you pack more effectiveness into a day — often because you prioritize your time. When working with others who are not as disciplined, ask them to clarify deadlines so you can adjust your workload to accommodate their requests. Seek out roles and responsibilities that have structure. Create routines that require you to systematically follow through. Over time, people will come to appreciate this kind of predictability. Questions 1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to take. 2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will take in the next 30 days. 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 8
  • 10. Competition Ideas for Action: Select work environments in which you can measure your achievements. You might not be able to discover how good you can be without competing. List the performance scores that help you know where you stand every day. What scores should you pay attention to? Identify a high-achieving person against whom you can measure your own achievement. If there is more than one, list all the people with whom you currently compete. Without measurement, how will you know if you won? Try to turn ordinary tasks into competitive games. You will get more done this way. When you win, take the time to investigate why you won. You can learn a great deal more from a victory than from a loss. Let people know that being competitive does not equate with putting others down. Explain that you derive satisfaction from pitting yourself against good, strong competitors and winning. Develop a “balanced metric” — a measurement system that will monitor all aspects of your performance. Even if you are competing against your own previous numbers, this measurement will help you give proper attention to all aspects of your performance. When competing with others, create development opportunities by choosing to compare yourself to someone who is slightly above your current level of expertise. Your competition will push you to refine your skills and knowledge to exceed those of that person. Look one or two levels above you for a role model who will push you to improve. Take the time to celebrate your wins. In your world, there is no victory without celebration. Design some mental strategies that can help you deal with a loss. Armed with these strategies, you will be able to move on to the next challenge much more quickly. Questions 1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to take. 2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will take in the next 30 days. 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 9
  • 11. Analytical Ideas for Action: Choose work in which you are paid to analyze data, find patterns, or organize ideas. For example, you might excel in marketing, financial, or medical research or in database management, editing, or risk management. Whatever your role, identify credible sources on which you can rely. You are at your best when you have well-researched sources of information and numbers to support your logic. For example, determine the most helpful books, websites, or publications that can serve as references. Your mind is constantly working and producing insightful analysis. Are others aware of that? Find the best way of expressing your thoughts: writing, one-on-one conversations, group discussions, perhaps lectures or presentations. Put value to your thoughts by communicating them. Make sure that your accumulation and analysis of information always leads to its application and implementation. If you don’t do this naturally, find a partner who pushes you from theory to practice, from thinking to doing. This person will help ensure that your analysis doesn’t turn into paralysis. Take an academic course that will expand your Analytical talents. Specifically, study people whose logic you admire. Volunteer your Analytical talents. You can be particularly helpful to those who are struggling to organize large quantities of data or having a hard time bringing structure to their ideas. Partner with someone with strong Activator talents. This person’s impatience will move you more quickly through the analytical phase into the action phase. You may remain skeptical until you see solid proof. Your skepticism ensures validity, but others may take it personally. Help others realize that your skepticism is primarily about data, not people. Look for patterns in data. See if you can discern a motif, precedent, or relationship in scores or numbers. By connecting the dots in the data and inferring a causal link, you may be able to help others see these patterns. Help others understand that your analytical approach will often require data and other information to logically back up new ideas that they might suggest. Questions 1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to take. 2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will take in the next 30 days. 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 10
  • 12. Focus Ideas for Action: When you set goals, discipline yourself to include timelines and measurements. These will provide regular proof that you are indeed making progress. Seek roles in which you can function independently. With your dominant Focus talents, you will be able to stay on track with little supervision. Your greatest worth as a team member might be helping others set goals. At the end of meetings, take responsibility for summarizing what was decided, for defining when these decisions will be acted on, and for setting a date when the group will reconvene. Others will think, act, and talk less efficiently than you do. Pay attention. Sometimes their “detours” will lead to discoveries and delights. Stretch your goal setting beyond work. If you find yourself becoming too focused on work goals, set goals for your personal life. They will give weight to your personal priorities and thereby help create balance in your life. Hours can disappear when you are intent on a task; you lose track of time. Make sure that all of your objectives are met and all of your priorities are followed by scheduling your efforts and sticking to that schedule. You function best when you can concentrate on a few well-defined initiatives and demands. Give yourself permission to reject projects or tasks that do not align with your overall mission. This will help you concentrate your efforts on your most important priorities — and will help others appreciate your need for focus. Take the time to write down your aspirations, and refer to them often. You will feel more in control of your life. At work, be sure to tell your manager your mid-term and short-term goals. This might well give your manager the confidence to give you the room you need. Make sure that the focus points you set for yourself take into consideration both quantity and quality. The integrity of your objectives will ensure that the application of your Focus talents leads to solid and long-lasting success. Questions 1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to take. 2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will take in the next 30 days. 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 11
  • 13. Significance Ideas for Action: Choose jobs or positions in which you can determine your own tasks and actions. You will enjoy the exposure that comes with independence. Your reputation is important to you, so decide what it should be and tend to it in the smallest detail. For example, identify and earn a designation that will add to your credibility, write an article that will give you visibility, or volunteer to speak in front of a group who will admire your achievements. Share your dreams and goals with your family or closest friends and colleagues. Their expectations will keep you reaching. Stay focused on performance. Your Significance talents will drive you to claim outstanding goals. Your performance had better match those goals, or others might label you as a big talker. You will perform best when your performance is visible. Look for opportunities that put you on center stage. Stay away from roles that hide you behind the scenes. Leading crucial teams or significant projects brings out your best. Your greatest motivation may come when the stakes are at their highest. Let others know that when the game is on the line, you want the ball. Make a list of the goals, achievements, and qualifications you crave, and post them where you will see them every day. Use this list to inspire yourself. Identify your best moment of recognition or praise. What was it for? Who gave it to you? Who was the audience? What do you have to do to recreate that moment? Unless you also possess dominant Self-Assurance talents, accept that you might fear failure. Don’t let this fear prevent you from staking claims to excellence. Instead, use it to focus on ensuring that your performance matches your claims. You might have a natural awareness of what other people think of you. You may have a specific audience that you want to like you, and you will do whatever it takes to win their approval and applause. Be aware that while reliance on the approval of others could be problematic, there is nothing wrong with wanting to be liked or admired by the key people in your life. Questions 1. Which of these action items speak to you? Highlight the actions that you are most likely to take. 2. How will you commit to taking action? Write your own personalized action item that you will take in the next 30 days. 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 12
  • 14. Section III: Achievement Look for signs of achievement as you read these real quotes from people who share your top five themes. Discipline sounds like this: Les T., hospitality manager: “The turning point in my career was attending one of those time- management courses some years back. I was always disciplined, but the power grew when I learned how to use that discipline in an organized process every day. This little Palm Pilot means that I call my mom every Sunday rather than letting months go by without calling. It means I take my wife out for dinner every week without her asking. It means that my employees know that if I say I need to see something on Monday, I will be calling on Monday if I haven’t seen it. This Palm Pilot is so much a part of my life that I have lengthened all of my pants pockets so that it fits right there on my hip.” Troy T., sales executive: “My filing system may not look that pretty, but it is very efficient. I write everything by hand because I know that no customer is going to see these files, so why waste time making them look pretty? My whole life as a salesperson is based on deadlines and follow-up. In my system, I keep track of everything so that I take responsibility not only for my deadlines and follow-up but for all of my customers’ and colleagues’ as well. If they haven’t gotten back to me by the time they promised, they’re going to receive an e-mail from me. In fact, I heard from one the other day who said, ‘I may as well get back to you because I know you’re going to call me if you haven’t heard from me.’” Diedre S., office manager: “I hate wasting time, so I make lists — long lists that keep me on track. Today my list has ninety items on it, and I will get through ninety-five percent of them. And that’s discipline because I don’t let anybody waste my time. I am not rude, but I can let you know in a very tactful, humorous way that your time is up.” 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 13
  • 15. Competition sounds like this: Mark L., sales executive: “I’ve played sports my entire life, and I don’t just play to have fun — let me put it that way. I like to engage in sports I am going to win and not ones I am going to lose, because if I lose, I am outwardly gracious but inwardly infuriated.” Harry D., general manager: “I'm not a big sailor, but I love the America’s Cup. Both boats are supposed to be exactly the same, and both crews have top-notch athletes. But you always get a winner. One of them had some secret up their sleeves that tipped the balance and enabled them to win more often than lose. And that’s what I am looking for — that secret, that tiny edge.” Sumner Redstone, chairman of Viacom (now known as CBS Corporation), on his efforts to acquire that company: “I relished every minute of it because Viacom was a company worth fighting for and I enjoyed a contest. If you get involved in a major competitive struggle, and the stress that inevitably comes with it, you’d better derive some real sense of satisfaction and enjoyment from the ultimate victory. Wrestling control of a company like Viacom was warfare. I believe the real lesson it taught me was that it is not about money, it’s about the will to win.” 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 14
  • 16. Analytical sounds like this: Jose G., school system administrator: “I have an innate ability to see structures, formats, and patterns before they exist. For instance, when people are talking about writing a grant proposal, while I’m listening to them, my brain instinctively processes the type of grants that are available and how the discussion fits into the eligibility, right down to the format of how the information can fit on the grant form in a clear and convincing way.” Jack T., human resources executive: “If I make a claim, I need to know that I can back it up with facts and logical thinking. For example, if someone says that our company is not paying as much as other companies, I always ask, ‘Why do you say that?’ If they say, ‘Well, I saw an ad in the paper that offers graduates in mechanical engineering five grand more than we are paying,’ I'll reply by asking, ‘But where are these graduates going to work? Is their salary based on geography? What types of companies are they going for? Are they manufacturing companies like ours? And how many people are in their sample? Is it three people, and one of them got a really good deal, thus driving the overall average up?’ There are many questions I need to ask to ensure that their claim is indeed a fact and not based on one misleading data point.” Leslie J., school principal: “Many times, there are inconsistencies in the performance of the same group of students from one year to the next. It’s the same group of kids, but their scores are different year to year. How can this be? Which building are the kids in? How many of the kids have been enrolled for a full academic year? Which teachers were they assigned to, and what teaching styles were used by those teachers? I just love asking questions like these to understand what is truly happening.” 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 15
  • 17. Focus sounds like this: Nick H., computer executive: “It is very important to me to be efficient. I’m the sort of guy who plays a round of golf in two and a half hours. When I was at Electronic Data Systems, I worked out a set list of questions so that I could conduct a review of each division in 15 minutes. The founder, Ross Perot, called me ‘The Dentist’ because I would schedule a whole day of these in-and-out, fifteen-minute meetings.” Brad F., sales executive: “I am always sorting priorities, trying to figure out the most efficient route toward the goal so that there is very little dead time, very little wasted motion. For example, I will get multiple calls from customers who need me to call the service department for them, and rather than taking each one of these calls as they come and interrupting the priorities of the day, I group them together into one call at the end of the day and get it done.” Mike L., administrator: “People are amazed how I put things into perspective and stay on track. When people around the district are stuck on issues and caught on contrived barriers, I am able to pole-vault over them, reestablish the focus, and keep things moving.” Doriane L., homemaker: “I am just the kind of person who likes to get to the point — in conversations, at work, and even when I am shopping with my husband. He likes to try on lots of things and has a good time doing it, whereas I try one thing on, and if I like it and it is not horribly priced, I buy it. I’m a surgical shopper.” 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 16
  • 18. Significance sounds like this: Mary P., healthcare executive: “Women are told almost from day one, ‘Don’t be too proud. Don’t stand tall.’ That kind of thing. But I’ve learned that it’s okay to have power, it’s okay to have pride, and it’s okay to have a big ego — and also that I need to manage it and drive it in the right directions.” Kathie J., partner in a law firm: “Ever since I can remember, I have had the feeling that I was special, that I could take charge and make things happen. Back in the ‘60s, I was the first woman partner in my firm, and I can still recall walking into boardroom after boardroom and being the only woman. It’s strange, thinking back. It was tough, but I actually think I enjoyed the pressure of standing out. I enjoyed being the ‘woman’ partner. Why? Because I knew that I would be very hard to forget. I knew everyone would notice me and pay attention to me.” John L., physician: “All through my life, I felt that I was onstage. I am always aware of an audience. If I am sitting with a patient, I want the patient to see me as the best doctor he or she has ever had. If I am teaching medical students, I want to stand out as the best medical educator they have ever had. I want to win the Educator of the Year award. My boss is a big audience for me. Disappointing her would kill me. It’s scary to think that part of my self-esteem is in other people’s hands, but then again, it keeps me on my toes.” 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 17
  • 19. Questions 1. Talk to friends or coworkers to hear how they have used their talents to achieve. 2. How will you use your talents to achieve? 369433853 (Paul Bourn) © 2000, 2006-2012 Gallup, Inc. All rights reserved. 18